Rembrandt Quotes

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1. “Bowling has the problem of wildly differing methods so that placing Wasim Akram against Bishan Bedi is rather like hanging a Rembrandt next to a Picasso and trying to produce a valid comparison.”

Tags : Bishan Bedi Cricket Picasso Rembrandt Wasim Akram
Source : Masterly Batting: 100 Great Test Innings

2. “What we have witnessed in our own time is the death of universities as centres of critique. Since Margaret Thatcher, the role of academia has been to service the status quo, not challenge it in the name of justice, tradition, imagination, human welfare, the free play of the mind or alternative visions of the future. We will not change this simply by increasing state funding of the humanities as opposed to slashing it to nothing. We will change it by insisting that a critical reflection on human values and principles should be central to everything that goes on in universities, not just to the study of Rembrandt or Rimbaud.”

Tags : 2010 2010 Uk Student Protests Academia Arthur Rimbaud Humanities Imagination Justice Margaret Thatcher Public University Radical Politics Radicalism Reactionary Politics Rembrandt Tradition Tuition Fees Uk University

3. “One day the last portrait of Rembrandt and the last bar of Mozart will have ceased to be — though possibly a colored canvas and a sheet of notes will remain — because the last eye and the last ear accessible to their message will have gone.”

Tags : Decline Decline Of The West Mozart Rembrandt Rembrandt Harmenszoon Van Rijn Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Wolfgang Mozart
Source : The Decline of the West, Vol 1: Form and Actuality

4. “OvermodulationBy Charlotte M Liebel-FawlsYou're a cavity in my oasis,You're a porthole in my sea,You're a stretch of the imagination every time you look at me.You're an ocean in my wineglass,You're a Steinway on the beach,You're a captivating audience, an exciting Rembrandt,A Masterpiece.”

Tags : Beach Imagination Love Masterpiece Oasis Ocean Poems Poetry Porthole Rembrandt Sea Wine Glass

5. “Since my visit to the Hermitage, I had become more aware of the four figures, two women and two men, who stood around the luminous space where the father welcomed his returning son. Their way of looking leaves you wondering how they think or feel about what they are watching. These bystanders, or observers, allow for all sorts of interpretations. As I reflect on my own journey, I become more and more aware of how long I have played the role of observer. For years I had instructed students on the different aspects of the spiritual life, trying to help them see the importance of living it. But had I, myself, really ever dared to step into the center, kneel down, and let myself be held by a forgiving God? The simple fact of being able to express an opinion, to set up an argument, to defend a position, and to clarify a vision has given me, and gives me still, a sense of control. And, generally, I feel much safer in experiencing a sense of control over an undefinable situation than in taking the risk of letting that situation control me. Certainly there were many hours of prayer, many days and months of retreat, and countless conversations with spiritual directors, but I had never fully given up the role of bystander. Even though there has been in me a lifelong desire to be an insider looking out, I nevertheless kept choosing over and over again the position of the outsider looking in. Sometimes this looking-in was a curious looking-in, sometimes a jealous looking-in, sometimes an anxious looking-in, and, once in a while, even a loving looking-in. But giving up the somewhat safe position of the critical observer seemed like a great leap into totally unknown territory. I so much wanted to keep some control over my spiritual journey, to be able to predict at least a part of the outcome, that relinquishing the security of the observer for the vulnerability of the returning son seemed close to impossible. Teaching students, passing on the many explanations given over the centuries to the words and actions of Jesus, and showing them the many spiritual journeys that people have chosen in the past seemed very much like taking the position of one of the four figures surrounding the divine embrace. The two women standing behind the father at different distances the seated man staring into space and looking at no one in particular, and the tall man standing erect and looking critically at the event on the platform in front of him--they all represent different ways of not getting involved. There is indifference, curiosity, daydreaming, and attentive observation; there is staring, gazing, watching, and looking; there is standing in the background, leaning against an arch, sitting with arms crossed, and standing with hands gripping each other. Every one of these inner and outward postures are all too familiar with me. Some are more comfortable than others, but all of them are ways of not getting directly involved," (pp. 12-13).”

Tags : Control Observer Outsider Prodigal Son Rembrandt
Source : The Return of the Prodigal Son: A Story of Homecoming

6. “You can be as good as Rembrandt, but if no one discovers you, you will only be a genius in theory.”

Tags : Discovery Genius Rembrandt
Author : Eric Weiner
Source : The Geography of Genius: A Search for the World's Most Creative Places from Ancient Athens to Silicon Valley

7. “Quien quiera hacer de Rembrandt un pensador, un rebelde enfrentado a su época, al encontrarse ante estas obras maestras deberá admitir que la verdad más convincente para definirlo es la furia creadora, una necesidad constante e irreprimible de representar con toda libertad y de consumir la vida en esta obsesión liberadora.”

Tags : Art Create Rembrandt
Source : Rembrandt

8. “Hij was een mens, en hij was vlees en botten en geest en ziel. Zij had van hem gehouden. De Ritselaer had hem gekocht, dokter Tulp had hem gevorderd voor de wetenschap en ik had hem willen hebben voor de kunst. Allemaal wilden we zijn vlees. Allemaal wilden we iets met het lichaam van deze man. Maar hij behoorde toe aan geen van ons. Hij was alleen maar Aris, de dief.”

Tags : Dutch Rembrandt Translation
Author : Nina Siegal
Source : The Anatomy Lesson