Clichés Quotes

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1. “I hate to hear you talk about all women as if they were fine ladies instead of rational creatures. None of us want to be in calm waters all our lives.”

Tags : Clichés Double Standards Empowerment Equality Feminism Flattery Gender Hypocrisy Independence Men Misogyny Rationality Reason Self Determination Social Norms Stereotypes Strength Women Women S Rights
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Persuasion

2. “My own sex, I hope, will excuse me, if I treat them like rational creatures, instead of flattering their fascinating graces, and viewing them as if they were in a state of perpetual childhood, unable to stand alone.”

Tags : Clichés Double Standards Empowerment Equality Feminism Flattery Gender Hypocrisy Independence Men Misogyny Rationality Reason Self Determination Self Sufficiency Social Norms Stereotypes Strength Women Women S Rights
Source : A Vindication of the Rights of Woman

3. “I earnestly wish to point out in what true dignity and human happiness consists. I wish to persuade women to endeavor to acquire strength, both of mind and body, and to convince them that the soft phrases, susceptibility of heart, delicacy of sentiment, and refinement of taste, are almost synonymous with epithets of weakness, and that those beings are only the objects of pity, and that kind of love which has been termed its sister, will soon become objects of contempt.”

Tags : Clichés Contempt Dignity Double Standards Empowerment Equality Feminism Flattery Gender Happiness Hypocrisy Independence Inequality Inferiority Men Misogyny Self Determination Social Norms Stereotypes Strength Weakness Women Women S Rights
Source : A Vindication of the Rights of Woman

4. “Very often the test of one's allegiance to a cause or to a people is precisely the willingness to stay the course when things are boring, to run the risk of repeating an old argument just one more time, or of going one more round with a hostile or (much worse) indifferent audience. I first became involved with the Czech opposition in 1968 when it was an intoxicating and celebrated cause. Then, during the depressing 1970s and 1980s I was a member of a routine committee that tried with limited success to help the reduced forces of Czech dissent to stay nourished (and published). The most pregnant moment of that commitment was one that I managed to miss at the time: I passed an afternoon with Zdenek Mlynar, exiled former secretary of the Czech Communist Party, who in the bleak early 1950s in Moscow had formed a friendship with a young Russian militant with an evident sense of irony named Mikhail Sergeyevitch Gorbachev. In 1988 I was arrested in Prague for attending a meeting of one of Vaclav Havel's 'Charter 77' committees. That outwardly exciting experience was interesting precisely because of its almost Zen-like tedium. I had gone to Prague determined to be the first visiting writer not to make use of the name Franz Kafka, but the numbing bureaucracy got the better of me. When I asked why I was being detained, I was told that I had no need to know the reason! Totalitarianism is itself a cliché (as well as a tundra of pulverizing boredom) and it forced the cliché upon me in turn. I did have to mention Kafka in my eventual story. The regime fell not very much later, as I had slightly foreseen in that same piece that it would. (I had happened to notice that the young Czechs arrested with us were not at all frightened by the police, as their older mentors had been and still were, and also that the police themselves were almost fatigued by their job. This was totalitarianism practically yawning itself to death.) A couple of years after that I was overcome to be invited to an official reception in Prague, to thank those who had been consistent friends through the stultifying years of what 'The Party' had so perfectly termed 'normalization.' As with my tiny moment with Nelson Mandela, a whole historic stretch of nothingness and depression, combined with the long and deep insult of having to be pushed around by boring and mediocre people, could be at least partially canceled and annealed by one flash of humor and charm and generosity.”

Tags : 1950S 1970S 1988 Allegiance Arguments Arrest Bad Crowds Boredom Bureaucracy Charm Charter 77 Cliches Commitment Communism Czechoslovakia Detention Dissent Exile Generosity Gorbachev History Humour Irony Kafka Mediocrity Moscow Politics Prague Totalitarianism Zdenek Mlynar
Source : Hitch-22: A Memoir

5. “The advantages of natural folly in a beautiful girl have been already set forth by the capital pen of a sister author; and to her treatment of the subject I will only add, in justice to men, that though to the larger and more trifling part of the sex, imbecility in females is a great enhancement of their personal charms, there is a portion of them too reasonable and too well informed themselves to desire anything more in woman than ignorance.”

Tags : Charms Clichés Desirability Disdain Education Empowerment Equality Folly Foolishness Girls Ignorance Imbecility Inferiority Men Perception Prejudice Reason Stereotypes Stupidity Women
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Northanger Abbey

6. “When a man gives his opinion, he's a man. When a woman gives her opinion, she's a bitch.”

Tags : Clichés Double Standards Empowerment Feminism Gender Hypocrisy Misogyny Opinions Speaking Out Stereotypes Women
Author : Bette Davis

7. “I myself have never been able to find out precisely what feminism is: I only know that people call me a feminist whenever I express sentiments that differentiate me from a doormat, or a prostitute.”

Tags : Clichés Empowerment Feminism Opinions Women Womens Liberation
Author : Rebecca West
Source : Young Rebecca: Writings, 1911-1917

8. “As long as she thinks of a man, nobody objects to a woman thinking.”

Tags : Clichés Dignity Double Standards Empowerment Feminism Gender Hypocrisy Intelligence Men Misogyny Self Determination Social Norms Stereotypes Thought Women
Source : Orlando

9. “Wherever you find a great man, you will find a great mother or a great wife standing behind him -- or so they used to say. It would be interesting to know how many great women have had great fathers and husbands behind them.”

Tags : Abilities Clichés Double Standards Empowerment Equality Feminism Feminist Gender Greatness Human Nature Husbands Hypocrisy Integrity Men Men And Women Misogyny Penina Mezei Skills Stereotypes Strong Wives Women
Source : Gaudy Night

10. “She was heartily ashamed of her ignorance - a misplaced shame. Where people wish to attach, they should always be ignorant. To come with a well−informed mind is to come with an inability of administering to the vanity of others, which a sensible person would always wish to avoid. A woman especially, if she have the misfortune of knowing anything, should conceal it as well as she can.”

Tags : Attachment Clichés Concealment Empowerment Feminism Ignorance Intelligence Irony Knowledge Preconceptions Prejudice Sarcasm Stereotypes Vanity Women
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Northanger Abbey

11. “We Are All Human"It should not matterThat we grew upOn opposite banks,On opposite streets,On the oppositeSide of the tracks, Or on opposite endsOf social ranks.It should not matterWhat your father does for workOr what race is in his blood,As long as you are goodAnd full of love.It should not matterThat you have more than meOr that I know more than youOr what my job isOr where I went to school –For we are all equalAnd it's only our polaritiesThat make each man unique,Resourceful,And every human useful.It should not matterThat the media wants toKeep dividing usBy constantly reminding us That we are from different sects,With labeled and typecasted Stereotypical characteristics And racial defects,And that there are rulesFor every age,Religion, class and sex."Sign over here.Put an X in the box.Then step to the leftSo I can see Who's next."Nobody should ever feelLike just another statistic.And nobody should ever feelAbove or below the rest.Remember to stand up for yourselfBefore you stand up to rip the test.Stand up for all that's fairAnd always speak out for what's right And best.It should not matterIf you are Chinese,Arab, Israeli or Cuban.If you seriously do realizeThat we are all just human.”

Tags : Age Differences Different Equal Equality Equals Father Good Humanize Income Inequality Justice Life Media Race Racial Racial Defects Racism Religion Resourceful Same Social Change Stereotypes Stereotyping White Work
Author : Suzy Kassem
Source : Rise Up and Salute the Sun: The Writings of Suzy Kassem

12. “I do not think I ever opened a book in my life which had not something to say upon woman's inconstancy. Songs and proverbs, all talk of woman's fickleness. But perhaps you will say, these were all written by men.""Perhaps I shall. Yes, yes, if you please, no reference to examples in books. Men have had every advantage of us in telling their own story. Education has been theirs in so much higher a degree; the pen has been in their hands. I will not allow books to prove anything.”

Tags : Books Clichés Constancy Double Standards Education Feminism Gender Inequality Love Men Misogyny Opportunities Social Norms Stereotypes Women
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Persuasion

13. “Do you really believe ... that everything historians tell us about men – or about women – is actually true? You ought to consider the fact that these histories have been written by men, who never tell the truth except by accident.”

Tags : Clichés Double Standards Feminism Gender History Hypocrisy Men Misogyny Prejudice Slander Social Norms Stereotypes Truth Women
Source : The Worth of Women: Wherein Is Clearly Revealed Their Nobility and Their Superiority to Men

14. “If men could see us as we really are, they would be a little amazed; but the cleverest, the acutest men are often under an illusion about women: they do not read them in a true light: they misapprehend them, both for good and evil: their good woman is a queer thing, half doll, half angel; their bad woman almost always a fiend.”

Tags : Clichés Double Standards Empowerment Expectations False Belief Feminism Gender Hypocrisy Illusions Misconceptions Misogyny Stereotypes Women
Source : Shirley

15. “A man once asked me ... how I managed in my books to write such natural conversation between men when they were by themselves. Was I, by any chance, a member of a large, mixed family with a lot of male friends? I replied that, on the contrary, I was an only child and had practically never seen or spoken to any men of my own age till I was about twenty-five. "Well," said the man, "I shouldn't have expected a woman (meaning me) to have been able to make it so convincing." I replied that I had coped with this difficult problem by making my men talk, as far as possible, like ordinary human beings. This aspect of the matter seemed to surprise the other speaker; he said no more, but took it away to chew it over. One of these days it may quite likely occur to him that women, as well as men, when left to themselves, talk very much like human beings also.”

Tags : Clichés Conversation Double Standards Feminism Fiction Gender Men Misogyny Natural Prejudice Stereotypes Women Women Writers Writing
Source : Are Women Human? Astute and Witty Essays on the Role of Women in Society

16. “[I]f we revert to history, we shall find that the women who have distinguished themselves have neither been the most beautiful nor the most gentle of their sex.”

Tags : Achievement Beauty Clichés Distinction Empowerment Gender Gentleness Greatness History Intelligence Self Determination Stereotypes Women
Source : A Vindication of the Rights of Woman

17. “Anything may happen when womanhood has ceased to be a protected occupation.”

Tags : Clichés Dignity Double Standards Empowerment Feminism Gender Hypocrisy Inequality Misogyny Morality Protectiveness Social Norms Stereotypes Womanhood Women
Source : A Room of One's Own

18. “In reaction against the age-old slogan, "woman is the weaker vessel," or the still more offensive, "woman is a divine creature," we have, I think, allowed ourselves to drift into asserting that "a woman is as good as a man," without always pausing to think what exactly we mean by that. What, I feel, we ought to mean is something so obvious that it is apt to escape attention altogether, viz: (...) that a woman is just as much an ordinary human being as a man, with the same individual preferences, and with just as much right to the tastes and preferences of an individual. What is repugnant to every human being is to be reckoned always as a member of a class and not as an individual person.”

Tags : Classification Clichés Dignity Discrimination Double Standards Empowerment Feminism Gender Individuality Misogyny Self Determination Social Norms Stereotypes Women
Source : Are Women Human? Astute and Witty Essays on the Role of Women in Society

19. “It is extraordinarily entertaining to watch the historians of the past ... entangling themselves in what they were pleased to call the "problem" of Queen Elizabeth. They invented the most complicated and astonishing reasons both for her success as a sovereign and for her tortuous matrimonial policy. She was the tool of Burleigh, she was the tool of Leicester, she was the fool of Essex; she was diseased, she was deformed, she was a man in disguise. She was a mystery, and must have some extraordinary solution. Only recently has it occrurred to a few enlightened people that the solution might be quite simple after all. She might be one of the rare people were born into the right job and put that job first.”

Tags : Abilities Achievements Career Clichés Double Standards Feminism Gender Good Governance Government History Hypocrisy Misogyny Queen Elizabeth I Reign Skills Stereotypes Success Women
Source : Are Women Human? Astute and Witty Essays on the Role of Women in Society

20. “The rule seemed to be that a great woman must either die unwed ... or find a still greater man to marry her. ... The great man, on the other hand, could marry where he liked, not being restricted to great women; indeed, it was often found sweet and commendable in him to choose a woman of no sort of greatness at all.”

Tags : Abilities Choice Clichés Double Standards Empowerment Feminism Gender Greatness Hypocrisy Inequality Marriage Matrimony Men Misogyny Skills Social Norms Stereotypes Women
Source : Gaudy Night

21. “There is no deception on the part of the woman, where a man bewilders himself: if he deludes his own wits, I can certainly acquit the women. Whatever man allows his mind to dwell upon the imprint his imagination has foolishly taken of women, is fanning the flames within himself -- and, since the woman knows nothing about it, she is not to blame. For if a man incites himself to drown, and will not restrain himself, it is not the water's fault.”

Tags : Cause And Effect Clichés Deceit Delusion Discrimination Double Standards Expectations Gender Inequality Men Misogyny Perception Prejudice Self Deception Social Norms Stereotypes Women
Author : John Gower
Source : Confessio Amantis

22. “Yet if women are so flighty, fickle, changeable, susceptible, and inconstant (as some clerks would have us believe), why is it that their suitors have to resort to such trickery to have their way with them? And why don't women quickly succumb to them, without the need for all this skill and ingenuity in conquering them? For there is no need to go to war for a castle that is already captured. (...)Therefore, since it is necessary to call on such skill, ingenuity, and effort in order to seduce a woman, whether of high or humble birth, the logical conclusion to draw is that women are by no means as fickle as some men claim, or as easily influenced in their behaviour. And if anyone tells me that books are full of women like these, it is this very reply, frequently given, which causes me to complain. My response is that women did not write these books nor include the material which attacks them and their morals. Those who plead their cause in the absence of an opponent can invent to their heart's content, can pontificate without taking into account the opposite point of view and keep the best arguments for themselves, for aggressors are always quick to attack those who have no means of defence. But if women had written these books, I know full well the subject would have been handled differently. They know that they stand wrongfully accused, and that the cake has not been divided up equally, for the strongest take the lion's share, and the one who does the sharing out keeps the biggest portion for himself.”

Tags : Books Deceit Defenselessness Fickleness Gender Inequality Injustice Men Misogyny Morality One Sidedness Perception Prejudice Received Opinion Seduction Slander Social Norms Stereotypes Suppression Unfairness Women
Source : Der Sendbrief vom Liebesgott / The Letter of the God of Love

23. “What we ask is to be human individuals, however peculiar and unexpected. It is no good saying: "You are a little girl and therefore you ought to like dolls"; if the answer is, "But I don't," there is no more to be said.”

Tags : Clichés Dignity Empowerment Freedom Gender Girls Self Determination Stereotypes
Source : Are Women Human? Astute and Witty Essays on the Role of Women in Society

24. “It is time to effect a revolution in female manners - time to restore to them their lost dignity - and make them, as a part of the human species, labour by reforming themselves to reform the world. It is time to separate unchangeable morals from local manners.”

Tags : Clichés Dignity Double Standards Empowerment Feminism Gender Hypocrisy Manners Misogyny Morality Reform Social Norms Stereotypes Women
Source : A Vindication of the Rights of Woman

25. “Come on, it’s an American tradition. Apple soup? Mom’s homemade chicken pie?' She chuckled in spite of herself, then winced. 'It’s apple pie and Mom’s homemade chicken soup. But you didn’t do badly, for a start.”

Tags : Clichés Damon Elena Fiction Paranormal Romance Vampire
Author : L.J. Smith
Source : Nightfall

26. “And sometimes, even though Dad said Dr. Snow was the best psychologist in the city and a very famous man, Jess thought there were things he didn't know either. "Time heals all wounds," he'd said to them once, his voice so soft and thoughtful he could have been talking to himself. It had seemed a cruel thing to say, though Jess knew he hadn't meant to be unkind. Vida had been really angry with him."No, it doesn't!" she shouted. "You're wrong! It doesn't!”

Tags : Cliches Counseling Psychologist
Author : Judith Clarke
Source : Starry Nights

27. “Now say, have women worth, or have they none? Or had they some, but with our Queen is’t gone? Nay Masculines, you have thus tax’d us long, But she, though dead, will vindicate our wrong. Let such as say our sex is void of reason Know ‘tis a slander now, but once was treason."(In Honour of that High and Mighty Princess, Queen Elizabeth)”

Tags : Clichés Elizabeth I Empowerment Equality Gender Mysogyny Stereotypes Women
Source : The Works of Anne Bradstreet

28. “Es gibt zwei Sorten von Männern. Die einen verstehen 'etwas von Frauen', die anderen sind solche, die einfach 'Frauen verstehen'. Ich weiß nicht, welche Sorte mir verdächtiger ist.”

Tags : Clichés Empathy Gender Men Mysogyny Prejudice Understanding Women
Author : Sten Nadolny
Source : Netzkarte.

29. “We are accustomed to repeating the cliché, and to believing, that 'our most precious resource is our children.' But we have plenty of children to go around, God knows, and as with Doritos, we can always make more. The true scarcity we face is practicing adults, of people who know how marginal, how fragile, how finite their lives and their stories and their ambitions really are but who find value in this knowledge, even a sense of strange comfort, because they know their condition is universal, is shared.”

Tags : Adulthood Children Cliches Communality Experience Obscurity
Source : Manhood for Amateurs

30. “Does a rake deserve to possess anything of worth, since he chases everything in skirts and then imagines he can successfully hide his shame by slandering [women in general]?”

Tags : Clichés Double Standards Gender Hypocrisy Immorality Men Misogyny Promiscuity Seduction Sexuality Shame Slander Social Norms Stereotypes Women
Source : Der Sendbrief vom Liebesgott / The Letter of the God of Love

31. “When you hear men talking," said Cornelia, "all they ever do is speak ill of women. ... And I don't quite know how they managed to make this law in their favour, or who exactly it was who gave them a greater license to sin than is allowed to us; and if the fault is common to both sexes (as they can hardly deny), why should the blame not be as well? What makes them think they can boast of the same thing that in women brings only shame?”

Tags : Clichés Double Standards Empowerment Feminism Gender Hypocrisy Inequality Men And Women Misogyny Morality Preconceptions Self Perception Sin Social Norms Stereotypes Vice
Source : The Worth of Women: Wherein Is Clearly Revealed Their Nobility and Their Superiority to Men

32. “Now, it is frequently asserted that, with women, the job does not come first. What (people cry) are women doing with this liberty of theirs? What woman really prefers a job to a home and family? Very few, I admit. It is unfortunate that they should so often have to make the choice. A man does not, as a rule, have to choose. He gets both. Nevertheless, there have been women ... who had the choice, and chose the job and made a success of it. And there have been and are many men who have sacrificed their careers for women ... When it comes to a choice, then every man or woman has to choose as an individual human being, and, like a human being, take the consequences.”

Tags : Career Choice Clichés Double Standards Empowerment Feminism Freedom Gender Inequality Misogyny Self Determination Stereotypes Women
Source : Are Women Human? Astute and Witty Essays on the Role of Women in Society

33. “Every culture has its southerners -- people who work as little as they can, preferring to dance, drink, sing brawl, kill their unfaithful spouses; who have livelier gestures, more lustrous eyes, more colorful garments, more fancifully decorated vehicles, a wonderful sense of rhythm, and charm, charm, charm; unambitious, no, lazy, ignorant, superstitious, uninhibited people, never on time, conspicuously poorer (how could it be otherwise, say the northerners); who for all their poverty and squalor lead enviable lives -- envied, that is, by work-driven, sensually inhibted, less corruptly governed northerners. We are superior to them, say the northerners, clearly superior. We do not shirk our duties or tell lies as a matter of course, we work hard, we are punctual, we keep reliable accounts. But they have more fun than we do ... They caution[ed] themselves as people do who know they are part of a superior culture: we mustn't let ourselves go, mustn't descend to the level of the ... jungle, street, bush, bog, hills, outback (take your pick). For if you start dancing on tables, fanning yourself, feeling sleepy when you pick up a book, developing a sense of rhythm, making love whenever you feel like it -- then you know. The south has got you.”

Tags : Clichés Culture North North And South Northerners Perceptions Prejudice Regions Society South Southerners Stereotypes Superiority
Author : Susan Sontag
Source : The Volcano Lover: A Romance

34. “In fact, there is perhaps only one human being in a thousand who is passionately interested in his job for the job's sake. The difference is that if that one person in a thousand is a man, we say, simply, that he is passionately keen on his job; if she is a woman, we say she is a freak.”

Tags : Career Clichés Double Standards Empowerment Feminism Gender Hypocrisy Men Misogyny Passion For Work Self Determination Social Norms Stereotypes Women
Source : Are Women Human? Astute and Witty Essays on the Role of Women in Society

35. “Wine and women make wise men dote and forsake God's law and do wrong." However, the fault is not in the wine, and often not in the woman. The fault is in the one who misuses the wine or the woman or other of God's crations. Even if you get drunk on the wine and through this greed you lapse into lechery, the wine is not to blame but you are, in being unable or unwilling to discipline yourself. And even if you look at a woman and become caught up in her beauty and assent to sin [= adultery; extramarital sex], the woman is not to blame nor is the beauty given her by God to be disparaged: rather, you are to blame for not keeping your heart more clear of wicked thoughts. ... If you feel yourself tempted by the sight of a woman, control your gaze better ... You are free to leave her. Nothing constrains you to commit lechery but your own lecherous heart.”

Tags : Adultery Beauty Clichés Double Standards Drunkenness Gender Greed Hypocrisy Immorality Lust Men Misogyny Sexuality Social Norms Stereotypes Temptation Wine Women
Author : Anonymous
Source : Dives And Pauper

36. “[Y]ou are not ashamed of your sin [in committing adultery] because so many men commit it. Man's wickedness is now such that men are more ashamed of chastity than of lechery. Murderers, thieves, perjurers, false witnesses, plunderers and fraudsters are detested and hated by people generally, but whoever will sleep with his servant girl in brazen lechery is liked and admired for it, and people make light of the damage to his soul. And if any man has the nerve to say that he is chaste and faithful to his wife and this gets known, he is ashamed to mix with other men, whose behaviour is not like his, for they will mock him and despise him and say he's not a real man; for man's wickedness is now of such proportions that no one is considered a man unless he is overcome by lechery, while one who overcomes lechery and stays chaste is considered unmanly.”

Tags : Adultery Clichés Crimes Double Standards Fidelity Gender Hypocrisy Immorality Manhood Manliness Men Misogyny Perception Promiscuity Social Norms Women
Source : Sermons 1-19

37. “God bids you not to commit lechery, that is, not to have sex with any woman except your wife. You ask of her that she should not have sex with anyone except you -- yet you are not willing to observe the same restraint in return. Where you ought to be ahead of your wife in virtue, you collapse under the onset of lechery. ... Complaints are always being made about men's lechery, yet wives do not dare to find fault with their husbands for it. Male lechery is so brazen and so habitual that it is now sanctioned [= permitted], to the extent that men tell their wives that lechery and adultery are legitimate for men but not for women.”

Tags : Adultery Clichés Double Standards Fidelity Gender Hypocrisy Marriage Men Misogyny Morality Sexuality Social Norms Stereotypes Wives Women
Source : Sermons 1-19

38. “i do not say 'good-bye.' i believe that's one of the bullshittiest words ever invented. it's not like you're given the choice to say 'bad-bye' or 'awful-bye' or 'couldn't-care-less-about-you-bye.' every time you leave, it's supposed to be a good one. well, i don't believe in that. i believe against that.”

Tags : Clichés Language Salutation
Source : Will Grayson, Will Grayson

39. “If I made a joke about just dropping by, would you write me off as cliché?”

Tags : Clary Fray Clichés Jace Wayland The Institute
Source : City of Ashes

40. “When people dis fantasy—mainstream readers and SF readers alike—they are almost always talking about one sub-genre of fantastic literature. They are talking about Tolkien, and Tolkien's innumerable heirs. Call it 'epic', or 'high', or 'genre' fantasy, this is what fantasy has come to mean. Which is misleading as well as unfortunate.Tolkien is the wen on the arse of fantasy literature. His oeuvre is massive and contagious—you can't ignore it, so don't even try. The best you can do is consciously try to lance the boil. And there's a lot to dislike—his cod-Wagnerian pomposity, his boys-own-adventure glorying in war, his small-minded and reactionary love for hierarchical status-quos, his belief in absolute morality that blurs moral and political complexity. Tolkien's clichés—elves 'n' dwarfs 'n' magic rings—have spread like viruses. He wrote that the function of fantasy was 'consolation', thereby making it an article of policy that a fantasy writer should mollycoddle the reader.That is a revolting idea, and one, thankfully, that plenty of fantasists have ignored. From the Surrealists through the pulps—via Mervyn Peake and Mikhael Bulgakov and Stefan Grabiński and Bruno Schulz and Michael Moorcock and M. John Harrison and I could go on—the best writers have used the fantastic aesthetic precisely to challenge, to alienate, to subvert and undermine expectations.Of course I'm not saying that any fan of Tolkien is no friend of mine—that would cut my social circle considerably. Nor would I claim that it's impossible to write a good fantasy book with elves and dwarfs in it—Michael Swanwick's superb Iron Dragon's Daughter gives the lie to that. But given that the pleasure of fantasy is supposed to be in its limitless creativity, why not try to come up with some different themes, as well as unconventional monsters? Why not use fantasy to challenge social and aesthetic lies?Thankfully, the alternative tradition of fantasy has never died. And it's getting stronger. Chris Wooding, Michael Swanwick, Mary Gentle, Paul di Filippo, Jeff VanderMeer, and many others, are all producing works based on fantasy's radicalism. Where traditional fantasy has been rural and bucolic, this is often urban, and frequently brutal. Characters are more than cardboard cutouts, and they're not defined by race or sex. Things are gritty and tricky, just as in real life. This is fantasy not as comfort-food, but as challenge.The critic Gabe Chouinard has said that we're entering a new period, a renaissance in the creative radicalism of fantasy that hasn't been seen since the New Wave of the sixties and seventies, and in echo of which he has christened the Next Wave. I don't know if he's right, but I'm excited. This is a radical literature. It's the literature we most deserve.”

Tags : Aesthetics Clichés Fantasy Fiction J R R Tolkien Literature

41. “Old Marley was as dead as a doornail.Mind! I don't mean to say that, of my own knowledge, what there is particularly dead about a doornail. I might have been inclined, myself, to regard a coffin-nail as the deadest piece of ironmongery in the trade. But the wisdom of our ancestors is in the simile; and my unhallowed hands shall not disturb it, or the Country's done for. You will therefore permit me to repeat, emphatically, that Marley was as dead as a doornail.”

Tags : Clichés Nails Similes Well Worn Phrases
Source : A Christmas Carol

42. “In a typical college romance novel, he'd be a gorgeous but troubled sex god who'd cure all my deep-seated psych issues with a good hard fuck. I'd smell his misogyny and abusive tendencies from miles off but my brain would turn to hormone soup because abs. That's the formula. Broken girl + bad boy = sexual healing. All you need to fix that tragic past is a six-pack. More problems? Add abs.It's Magic Dick Lit.”

Tags : Clichés College Romance Humor New Adult New Adult Romance
Author : Leah Raeder
Source : Black Iris

43. “Indeed it may be said with some confidence that the average man never really thinks from end to end of his life. There are moments when his cogitations are relatively more respectable than usual, but even at their climaxes they never reach anything properly describable as the level of serious thought. The mental activity of such people is only a mouthing of clichés. What they mistake for thought is simply a repetition of what they have heard. My guess is that well over eighty per cent. of the human race goes through life without having a single original thought. That is to say, they never think anything that has not been thought before and by thousands.”

Tags : Clichés Freethought Human Race Irony Thought
Author : H.L. Mencken
Source : Minority Report

44. “[T]he wisdom of our ancestors is in the simile.”

Tags : Clichés Quotations Similes Well Worn Phrases Wisdom
Source : A Christmas Carol

45. “[J]ust the sight of this book, even though it was of no authority, made me wonder how it happened that so many different men – and learned men among them – have been and are so inclined to express both in speaking and in their treatises and writings so many wicked insults about women and their behaviour. Not only one or two ... but, more generally, from the treatises of all philosophers and poets and from all the orators – it would take too long to mention their names – it seems that they all speak from one and the same mouth. Thinking deeply about these matters, I began to examine my character and conduct as a natural woman and, similarly, I considered other women whose company I frequently kept, princesses, great ladies, women of the middle and lower classes, who had graciously told me of their most private and intimate thoughts, hoping that I could judge impartially and in good conscience whether the testimony of so many notable men could be true. To the best of my knowledge, no matter how long I confronted or dissected the problem, I could not see or realise how their claims could be true when compared to the natural behaviour and character of women.”

Tags : Behaviour Books Character Clichés Conduct Double Standards Empowerment Expectations Feminism Gender Hypocrisy Impartiality Inequality Insults Men Misogyny Morality Preconceptions Prejudice Reality Check Slander Social Norms Stereotypes Women
Source : The Book of the City of Ladies

46. “Causing any damage or harm to one party in order to help another party is not justice, and likewise, attacking all feminine conduct [in order to warn men away from individual women who are deceitful] is contrary to the truth, just as I will show you with a hypothetical case. Let us suppose they did this intending to draw fools away from foolishness. It would be as if I attacked fire -- a very good and necessary element nevertheless -- because some people burnt themselves, or water because someone drowned. The same can be said of all good things which can be used well or used badly. But one must not attack them if fools abuse them.”

Tags : Abuse Clichés Conduct Damage Danger Double Standards Gender Generalizations Harm Hypocrisy Individuality Misogyny Misrepresentation Morality One Sidedness Perceptions Prejudice Social Norms Stereotypes Truth Women
Source : The Book of the City of Ladies

47. “The man or the woman in whom resides greater virtue is the higher; neither the loftiness nor the lowliness of a person lies in the body according to the sex, but in the perfection of conduct and virtues.”

Tags : Clichés Conduct Double Standards Empowerment Equality Gender Hypocrisy Men Misogyny Morality Perception Prejudice Social Norms Superiority Virtue Women
Source : The Book of the City of Ladies

48. “That night she wrote a hasty sketch and showed it to Oliver. "It's all right," he said. "But I'd take out that stuff about Olympian mountains and the Stygian caverns of the mine. That's about used up, I should think.”

Tags : Clichés Exaggeration Metaphors Mythology Writing
Source : Angle of Repose

49. “Maybe she would have done more good as a playwright than as a doctor, after all — clichés were like plaque in the arteries of the imagination, they clogged the sense of what was possible. Maybe if enough people had worked to demolish clichés, the world wouldn't have ended.”

Tags : Arteries Cliches Doctor End Of The World As We Know It Imagination Playwright

50. “Morris Weissman [on the phone, discussing casting for his movie]: "What about Claudette Colbert? She's British, isn't she? She sounds British. Is she, like, affected or is she British?”

Tags : Accents Actors Affectations British Claudette Colbert Clichés Directors Film Industry Humor Movie Business Movies Perceptions Stereotypes
Source : Gosford Park: The Shooting Script

51. “It is a cliche that most cliches are true, but then like most cliches, that cliche is untrue.”

Tags : Cliches
Author : Stephen Fry

52. “The reason that clichés become clichés is that they are the hammers and screwdrivers in the toolbox of communication.”

Tags : Cliches Tropes
Source : Guards! Guards!

53. “Clichés can be quite fun. That's how they got to be clichés.”

Tags : Cliches Humor Wisdom Writing
Author : Alan Bennett
Source : The History Boys

54. “I wish i could tell you that through the tragedy i mined some undiscovered, life-altering absolute that i could pass on to you.I didn't.The cliches apply-people are what count,life is precious,materialism is over rated, and the little things matter,live in the moment-and i can repeat them to you ad nauseam.you might listen, but you won't internalize.Tragedy hammers it hm.Tragedy etches into your soul.You might not be happier.But you will be better.”

Tags : Cliches Life Tragedy Truth
Author : Harlan Coben
Source : Tell No One

55. “It’s hard to help those who don’t want to help themselves.” “Someone who wants to help himself is possibly not the one who most needs help from others,” Elsa objects.”

Tags : Cliches
Source : My Grandmother Asked Me to Tell You She's Sorry

56. “A cliche is a cliche because it works”

Tags : Cliches Critisism Writing
Author : Feige Gornish

57. “One of the more ignominious features of love was that you could only express it with cliches...it made you sound like a fraud at a time when you were blazing with sincerity.”

Tags : Cliches Love
Author : Lisa Kleypas
Source : Crystal Cove

58. “One of the most common platitudes we heard was that “words failed.” But words were not failing us at all. It was not true that there was no way to describe our experience. We had plenty of language to talk to each other about the horror of what was happening, and talk we did. If there was a communication problem it was that there were too many words; they were far too heavy and too specific to be inflicted upon others. If something was failing it was the functionality of routine, platitudinous language—the comforting clichés were now inapplicable and perfectly useless. We instinctively protected other people from the knowledge we possessed; we let them think that words failed, because we knew they didn’t want to be familiar with the vocabulary we used daily. We were sure they didn’t want to know what we did; we didn’t want to know it either.”

Tags : Cliches Communication Problem Illness Platitudes Words Words Failed
Source : The Book of My Lives

59. “...he remembered his uncle saying once how little vocabulary man really needed to get comfortably and even efficiently through his life, how not only in the individual but within his whole type and race and kind a few simple cliches served his few simple passions and needs and lusts.”

Tags : Cliches Vocabulary

60. “Monotonous talk of the end of American hegemony, the universal cliché of the period, is mostly a way of avoiding mounting a serious opposition to it.”

Tags : 2010 21St Century American Imperialism Cliches Hegemony Politics United States
Author : Tariq Ali
Source : The Obama Syndrome: Surrender at Home, War Abroad

61. “Do You Come Here Often?' and 'Be Part of the Action' Have Become Clichéd"Coast Guard Sees Increasing Need for Icebreakers"—headline, Associated Press, March 1”

Tags : Cliches Humour Icebreakers Icebreakers Facilitation Puns
Author : James Taranto

62. “Absence makes the mind go yonder.”

Tags : Cliches Paraprosdokian Psychology Quotes Puns
Source : Cartoonist's Book Camp

63. “I know, I know…there’s something cliché about that. The heroine initially wanting to clobber a protagonist male, but later realizing that he’s grown on her and she actually really likes him. Technically, I’m not supposed to find that appealing. But maybe real life is a lot more cliché than anyone wants to admit. Or maybe there’s just a fine, subjective line between the cliché and the poetic.”

Tags : Cliche Cliches Inspirational Poetic Romantic
Source : Once Upon a Road Trip

64. “Let's have some new cliches.”

Tags : Cliches Words

65. “Eventually all things become cliché.”

Tags : Cliches
Author : Duane Hewitt

66. “You're a kid. I didn't know we taught kids manners anymore.”

Tags : Cliches Dystopia Immortality Science Fiction
Source : The Immortality Virus

67. “She looked so disappointed, so grieved and desperate that Clem longed to comfort her, only he couldn't think of thing to say that she hadn't heard a hundred times from Dad and Dr. Snow and Mrs. Mack: how things would get better in time, though no one knew how much time, and that life might be a little better for her and Jess once school began again.”

Tags : Cliches Comforting Loss
Author : Judith Clarke
Source : Starry Nights

68. “To have luck and fail to act on it is tantamount to not having luck at all. In fact, it was worse. Barnes thought back to his self-help manuals. They all proclaimed with compelling force the necessity of recognizing opportunity then seizing it when it stuck.”

Tags : Aphorisms Cliches Nostrums Self Help
Source : Wanted: Elevator Man

69. “So we all know the cliché characters: the Irish cop, the prostitute with a heart of gold, the writer with a drinking problem, and so forth. Clichés often exist for a reason, of course, and sometimes it’s okay to use a tried and true character. But not always. Populate your stories with only stock characters and there won’t be any reason to read your tales over anyone else’s.”

Tags : Character Development Cliches Writing
Author : Craig Hart
Source : The Writer's Tune-up Manual: 35 Exercises That Will Scrape the Rust Off Your Writing

70. “Cliches work by appealing to the collective unconscious. They are the Pachbel's Canon in D of writing, something familiar the talented can riff off to create a distinct work.”

Tags : Cliches Collective Unconscious Pachbel S Canon
Source : Pagan Standard Times: Essays on the Craft

71. “Readers have pet-peeved the cliché to death.”

Tags : Cliches Pet Peeves

72. “Cliches, stock phrases, adherence to conventional, standardized codes of expression and conduct have the socially recognized function of protecting us against reality, that is, against the claim on our thinking attention that all events and facts make by virtue of their existence.”

Tags : Cliches Thinking
Author : Hannah Arendt
Source : The Life of the Mind: The Groundbreaking Investigation on How We Think

73. “A good writer is a great writer when they can make the cliché work again.”

Tags : Cliches

74. “Only in art were there cliches; never in nature. There were no ordinary human beings. Everybody was born with surprise inside.”

Tags : Cliches
Author : Jincy Willett
Source : The Writing Class

75. “Given the situation I had gotten myself into, I just chose the path that seemed most likely to succeed and did the best I could. But Shota died so suddenly. His death ripped open a deep fissure in my life. It was a cruel and heedless truth that I will never be able to comprehend. No matter what I do, I cannot change it. Is there any meaning in this world where Shota could die such an inexplicable death? That fissure spread through me unexpectedly. A responsible person would probably tell me to smile even though he’s gone. They’d probably say Shota, even though he was only a child, would have wanted me to lead a good life. But I don’t need to hear those words. This world is overflowing with hackneyed expressions like that. They can comfort most people, but they make me suffer. Words that most people nod along to make those who can’t nod along suffer. They alienate them. What about words that can reach someone like me? Do those exist? I am twisted. I can’t look at the world straight. But why am still trying to live on? Even though I think it would be better to curse the world, smile perversely and die.”

Tags : Cliches Life And Living Life Experience Life Philosophy
Source : The Kingdom

76. “...sayings only become clichés because they're true.”

Tags : Cliches Quotes Sayings
Author : MC Domovitch

77. “Clichés so often befall vain people.”

Tags : Clichés Vain Vanity
Author : Ann Beattie
Source : Walks With Men: Fiction

78. “My Lady, you certainly tell me about wonderful constancy, strength and virtue and firmness of women, so can one say the same thing about men? (...)Response [by Lady Rectitude]: "Fair sweet friend, have you not yet heard the saying that the fool sees well enough a small cut in the face of his neighbour, but he disregards the great gaping one above his own eye? I will show you the great contradiction in what the men say about the changeability and inconstancy of women. It is true that they all generally insist that women are very frail [= fickle] by nature. And since they accuse women of frailty, one would suppose that they themselves take care to maintain a reputation for constancy, or at the very least, that the women are indeed less so than they are themselves. And yet, it is obvious that they demand of women greater constancy than they themselves have, for they who claim to be of this strong and noble condition cannot refrain from a whole number of very great defects and sins, and not out of ignorance, either, but out of pure malice, knowing well how badly they are misbehaving. But all this they excuse in themselves and say that it is in the nature of man to sin, yet if it so happens that any women stray into any misdeed (of which they themselves are the cause by their great power and longhandedness), then it's suddenly all frailty and inconstancy, they claim. But it seems to me that since they do call women frail, they should not support that frailty, and not ascribe to them as a great crime what in themselves they merely consider a little defect.”

Tags : Clichés Constancy Double Standards Empowerment Feminism Firmness Frailty Gender Hypocrisy Inequality Men Misogyny Morality Preconceptions Prejudice Sin Slander Social Norms Stereotypes Strength Of Character Vice Virtue Women
Source : The Book of the City of Ladies

79. “[I]f you seek in every way to minimise my firm beliefs by your anti-feminist attacks, please recall that a small dagger or knife point can pierce a great, bulging sack and that a small fly can attack a great lion and speedily put him to flight.”

Tags : Attacks Beliefs Clichés Convictions Dignity Double Standards Feminism Gender Hypocrisy Insults Men Misogyny Preconceptions Prejudice Repartee Self Esteem Self Importance Slander Stereotypes Wit Women
Source : Le Débat Sur Le Roman De La Rose

80. “[S]ince you are angry at me without reason, you attack me harshly with, "Oh outrageous presumption! Oh excessively foolish pride! Oh opinion uttered too quickly and thoughtlessly by the mouth of a woman! A woman who condemns a man of high understanding and dedicated study, a man who, by great labour and mature deliberation, has made the very noble book of the Rose, which surpasses all others that were ever written in French. When you have read this book a hundred times, provided you have understood the greater part of it, you will discover that you could never have put your time and intellect to better use!" My answer: Oh man deceived by willful opinion! I could assuredly answer but I prefer not to do it with insult, although, groundlessly, you yourself slander me with ugly accusations. Oh darkened understanding! Oh perverted knowledge ... A simple little housewife sustained by the doctrine of Holy Church could criticise your error!”

Tags : Attacks Beliefs Clichés Convictions Dignity Double Standards Feminism Gender Hypocrisy Insults Men Misogyny Preconceptions Prejudice Repartee Self Esteem Self Importance Slander Stereotypes Wit Women
Source : Le Débat Sur Le Roman De La Rose

81. “rather babble away and at least partially express something difficult than reproduce impeccable clichés”

Tags : Castorp Cliché Clichés Nonsense Sense
Author : Thomas Mann
Source : The Magic Mountain

82. “What'll Geoffrey do when you pull off your First, my child?" demanded Miss Haydock."Well, Eve -- it will be awkward if I do that. Poor lamb! I shall have to make him believe I only did it by looking fragile and pathetic at the viva.”

Tags : Abilities Academia Academic Degrees Achievements Clichés Double Standards Empowerment Feminism Gender Intellectual Success Intelligence Misogyny Prejudice Skills Stereotypes Women
Source : Gaudy Night

83. “[Women] complain about many clerks who attribute all sorts of faults to them and who compose works about them in rhyme, prose, and verse, criticizing their conduct in a variety of different ways. They then give these works as elementary textbooks to their young pupils at the beginning of their schooling, to provide them with exempla and received wisdom, so that they will remember this teaching when they come of age ... They accuse [women] of many ... serious vice[s] and are very critical of them, finding no excuse for them whatsoever.This is the way clerks behave day and night, composing their verse now in French, now in Latin. And they base their opinions on goodness only knows which books, which are more mendacious than a drunk. Ovid, in a book he wrote called Cures for Love, says many evil things about women, and I think he was wrong to do this. He accuses them of gross immorality, of filthy, vile, and wicked behaviour. (I disagree with him that they have such vices and promise to champion them in the fight against anyone who would like to throw down the gauntlet ...) Thus, clerks have studied this book since their early childhood as their grammar primer and then teach it to others so that no man will undertake to love a woman.”

Tags : Books Clichés Double Standards Empowerment Falsehood Gender Hypocrisy Instruction Love Men Misogyny Misrepresentation Morality Perception Prejudice Received Opinion Slander Social Norms Stereotypes Teaching Women
Source : Der Sendbrief vom Liebesgott / The Letter of the God of Love

84. “[T]he more clamour we make about 'the women's point of view', the more we rub it into people that the women's point of view is different, and frankly I do not think it is -- at least in my job. The line I always want to take is, that there is the 'point of view' of the reasonably enlightened human brain, and that this is the aspect of the matter which I am best fitted to uphold.”

Tags : Brain Clichés Double Standards Empowerment Equality Feminism Gender Intellect Intelligence Misogyny Perspective Point Of View Prejudice Stereotypes Women
Source : The Letters of Dorothy L. Sayers. Vol. 1, 1899-1936: The Making of a Detective Novelist

85. “Perhaps it was that I wanted to see what I had learned, what I had read, what I had imagined, that I would never be able to see the city of London without seeing it through the overarching scrim of every description of it I had read before. When I turn the corner into a small, quiet, leafy square, am I really seeing it fresh, or am I both looking and remembering? [...]This is both the beauty and excitement of London, and its cross to bear, too. There is a tendency for visitors to turn the place into a theme park, the Disney World of social class, innate dignity, crooked streets, and grand houses, with a cavalcade of monarchs as varied and cartoony as Mickey Mouse, Snow White, and, at least in the opinion of various Briths broadhseets, Goofy.They come, not to see what London is, or even what it was, but to confirm a kind of picture-postcard view of both, all red telephone kiosks and fog-wreathed alleyways.”

Tags : Cities Clichés Fiction Fictional London Imagination Literary London London Preconceptions Reality Check Realiy Truth
Author : Anna Quindlen
Source : Imagined London: A Tour of the World's Greatest Fictional City

86. “Washingtonians love the "So-and-so is spinning in his grave" cliché. Someone is always speculating about how some great dead American would be scandalized over some crime against How It Used to Be. The Founding Fathers are always spinning in their graves over something, as is Ronald Reagan, or FDR. Edward R. Murrow is a perennial grave spinner in the news business (though in fact, Murrow was cremated).”

Tags : Clichés Comparison Contrasts Edward R Murrow Gossip Great Americans Journalism Media Nostalgia Political Gossip Politics Scandalization Scandals Sensibilities Speculation Spinning In Their Grave Washington Dc
Source : This Town: Two Parties and a Funeral — plus plenty of valet parking! — in America’s Gilded Capital

87. “If woman had no existence save in the fiction written by men, one would imagine her a person of the utmost importance (...); as great as a man, some think even greater. But this is woman in fiction. In fact, as Professor Trevelyan points out [in his History of England], she was locked up, beaten and flung about the room.”

Tags : Abuse Clichés Dignity Equality Fiction Gender Greatness Hypocrisy Importance Respect Stereotypes Truth Woman
Source : A Room of One's Own

88. “Is it possible to say "It was a beautiful morning at the end of November" without feeling like Snoopy?”

Tags : Clichés Originality Stereotypes Writing
Author : Umberto Eco
Source : Postscript to the Name of the Rose

89. “Prose consists less and less of words chosen for the sake of their meaning, and more and more of phrases tacked together like the sections of a prefabricated hen-house.”

Tags : Clichés Language Phrases Words Words Have Power
Author : George Orwell
Source : Politics and the English Language

90. “People are fond of spouting out the old cliché about how Van Gogh never sold a painting in his lifetime. Somehow his example serves to justify to us, decades later, that there is merit in utter failure.Perhaps, but the man did commit suicide. The market for his work took off big-time shortly after his death. Had he decided to stick around another few decades he most likely would’ve entered old age quite prosperous. And sadly for failures everywhere, the cliché would have lost a lot of its power.The fact is, the old clichés work for us in abstract terms, but they never work out in real life quite the same way. Life is messy; clichés are clean and tidy.”

Tags : Art Clichés Creativity Failure Success Van Gogh
Author : Hugh MacLeod
Source : Ignore Everybody: and 39 Other Keys to Creativity

91. “I have spent a great deal of my life discovering that my ambitions and fantasies - which I once thought of as totally unique - turn out to be clichés”

Tags : Ambitions Clichés Fantasies Life
Author : Nora Ephron
Source : Crazy Salad and Scribble Scribble: Some Things About Women and Notes on Media

92. “Let me guess," Seven said last night. "The first was a rebound. The second was married."How'd you know?"He laughed. "Because you're a cliché.”

Tags : Clichés Julia Romano Rebound Relationships Seven
Author : Jodi Picoult
Source : My Sister's Keeper

93. “As I stated earlier, I do not believe there is anything inherently wrong with even the most overused elements of epic fantasy. Magic swords, dragons, destined heroes -- even dark lords and ultimate evils can legitimately be used in literature of serious intent, not just mocked in satirical meta-fiction. To claim that they cannot would be much the same as claiming that nothing good can ever again be done with fiction involving detectives, or young lovers, or unhappy families. The value of a fictive element is not an inherent quality, but a contextual one, determined by its relationship to the other elements of the story it is embedded in.In other words, whether a scene in which a dragon is introduced is affecting, amusing, or agonizingly dull depends primarily on the choices made by the scene's author. I say "primarily" because dragons have appeared in thousands of stories over the centuries, and almost any reader may be presumed to have been exposed to at least one such. The reader's reaction will naturally be influenced by how they feel this new dragon compares to the dragons which they have been introduced to in the past. (Favorably, one would hope. A dragon must learn to make a good first impression if it is to do well in this life.) Such variables are out of the author's control, as are any unreasoning prejudices against dragons on the part of the reader. All that can be done is to make the dragon as vivid and well-suited for its purpose as is possible. If all the elements of fantasy and fiction in a work are fitted to their purposes and combine to create a moving story set in a convincing world, that work will presumably be a masterpiece.”

Tags : Art Clichés Dragons Evil Overlord Fantasy Heroes Masterpiece Swords Tropes
Author : Alec Austin

94. “Raging crime, class warfare, invasive immigrants, light morals, public misbehavior. Always we convince ourselves that the parade of unwelcome and despised is a new phenomenon, which is why the phrase "the good old days" has passed from cliché to self-parody.”

Tags : Class Warfare Cliches Crime Exclusion Immigration Morals Nostaliga Parody Prejudice Self Deception Social Change Social Norms Society Xenophobia
Author : Anna Quindlen
Source : Imagined London: A Tour of the World's Greatest Fictional City

95. “Women, for their part, are always complaining that we raise them only to be vain and coquettish, that we keep them amused with trifles so that we may more easily remain their masters; they blame us for the faults we attribute to them. What stupidity! And since when is it men who concern themselves with the education of girls? Who is preventing the mothers from raising them as they please? There are no schools for girls—what a tragedy! Would God, there were none for boys! They would be raised more sensibly and more straightforwardly. Is anyone forcing your daughters to waste their time on foolish trifles? Are they forced against their will to spend half their lives on their appearance, following your example? Are you prevented from instructing them, or having them instructed according to your wishes? Is it our fault if they please us when they are beautiful, if their airs and graces seduce us, if the art they learn from you attracts and flatters us, if we like to see them tastefully attired, if we let them display at leisure the weapons with which they subjugate us? Well then, decide to raise them like men; the men will gladly agree; the more women want to resemble them, the less women will govern them, and then men will truly be the masters.”

Tags : Clichés Double Standards Empowerment Feminism Gender Hypocrisy Misogyny Patriarchy Rape Culture Stereotypes Women
Source : Emile or On Education

96. “Why do you consult [women's] words when it is not their mouths that speak? Consult their eyes, their colour, their breathing, their timid manner, their slight resistance, that is the language nature gave them for your answer. The lips always say 'No,' and rightly so; but the tone is not always the same, and that cannot lie. Has not a woman the same needs as a man, but without the same right to make them known? Her fate would be too cruel if she had no language in which to express her legitimate desires except the words which she dare not utter.”

Tags : Clichés Double Standards Empowerment Feminism Gender Hypocrisy Misogyny No Means Yes Patriarchy Rape Culture Stereotypes Women
Source : Emile

97. “I felt like the blonde in every horror movie who hears a noise in the basement and goes to investigate alone. Sometimes you smell the stupid all around you, but you step in it anyway.”

Tags : Blonde Humor Clichés
Author : Ann Aguirre
Source : Blue Diablo

98. “Clichés remind and reassure us that we're not alone, that others have trod this ground long ago.”

Tags : Clichés
Author : Miguel Syjuco
Source : Ilustrado

99. “Two clichés make us laugh. A hundred cliches move us. For we sense dimly that the clichés are talking among themselves, and celebrating a reunion.(Casablanca, or, The Clichés Are Having a Ball)”

Tags : Art Clichés
Author : Umberto Eco
Source : Signs of Life in the U.S.A.: Readings on Popular Culture for Writers

100. “It's okay to write a cliché in a first draft; it sets a marker that you can get far, far away from in the rewrites.”

Tags : Clichés First Drafts Originality Rewrites Rewriting Writing Writing Advice Writing Advice Process Writing Process

101. “Sometimes I believe that love dies but hope springs eternal. Sometimes I believe that hope dies but love springs eternal. Sometimes I believe that sex plus guilt equals love, and sometimes I believe that sex plus guilt equals good sex. Sometimes I believe that love is as natural as the tides, and sometimes I believe that love is an act of will. Sometimes I believe that some people are better at love than others, and sometimes I believe that everyone is faking it. Sometimes I believe that love is essential, and sometimes I believe that only reason love is essential is that otherwise you spend all your time looking for it.”

Tags : Clichés Love Poetic Romantic
Author : Nora Ephron
Source : Heartburn

102. “In a crisis perhaps it is old clichés one clings to, like a child to a parent.”

Tags : Clichés
Author : Graham Greene
Source : The Human Factor

103. “I hate that more than anything—being part of a cliché.”

Tags : Clichés
Author : Kim Edwards
Source : The Memory Keeper's Daughter

104. “Always go with your first impetuosity.”

Tags : Clichés Misquoting

105. “I was under the impression clichés could ruin you, ruin your life, your hopes and dreams, bring down your whole operation if you didn't watch it. They were gateway language, leading straight to a business major, a golfy marriage, needlepoint pillows that said things about your golf game, and a self-inflicted gunshot to the head that your family called a heart attack in your alma mater announcements. Character suicide.”

Tags : Clichés
Author : Jeanne Darst
Source : Fiction Ruined My Family

106. “Va a sonar muy cliché o muy bobo, pero las cosas no suceden sólo porque sí, o tal vez sí lo hacen, y nosotros sólo le damos ese sentido al decir esa frase tonta que usamos para justificar lo que nos sucede, pero no sé. Tal vez ésa sí sea una de las pocas cosas que pasaron por algo y no sólo porque sí.Pero cuando unos hombres abrieron mi puerta y me jalaron mientras yo comenzaba a gritar, supe que nada podía mejorar y en ningún momento se me cruzó por la mente ese: Tal vez esto está pasando por algo.”

Tags : Clichés Humor Life Literature Mexican Mafia Mexico Spanish Thought Vida
Source : Cosas que no duran

107. “Cliches remind and reassure us that we're not alone, that other have trod this ground long ago.”

Tags : Cliches Relating
Author : Miguel Syjuco

108. “My life as well as my writing are guided by creed in lieu of clichés Carl Henegan”

Tags : Cliches Life Writing
Author : Carl Henegan

109. “Cliches are the viruses that infect your writing with diseases.”

Tags : Aspiring Writers Authors Books Cliches Creative Writing Fiction Fundamentals Of Creative Writing Fundamentals Of Writing Literature On Writing Power Of Words Quotes On Writing Reading Short Story Story Writing Tips On Writing Write Writers Writing Writing Advice Writing Craft Writing Fiction Writing Style
Author : Pawan Mishra