Thomas Hardy Quotes

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1. “Happiness was but the occasional episode in a general drama of pain.”

Tags : Happiness Life Suffering
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : The Mayor of Casterbridge

2. “But there were certain early days in Casterbridge- days of firmamental exhaustion which followed angry south-westerly tempests-when, if the sun shone, the air was like velvet.”

Tags : Exhaustion Spring Springtime Sun Tempest Velvet Weather
Author : Thomas Hardy

3. “When yellow lights struggle with blue shades in hairlike lines.”

Tags : Atmosphere Color Light
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Tess of the D'Urbervilles

4. “The atmosphere beneath is languorous, and is so tinged with azure that what artists call the middle distance partakes also of that hue, while the horizon beyond is of the deepest ultramarine.”

Tags : Atmosphere Colors Description Landscape Painting
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Tess of the D'Urbervilles

5. “If an offense come out of the truth, better is it that the offense come than that the truth be concealed.”

Tags : Truth Telling
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Tess of the D'Urbervilles

6. “Sometimes a woman's love of being loved gets the better of her conscience, and though she is agonized at the thought of treating a man cruelly, she encourages him to love her while she doesn't love him at all. Then, when she sees him suffering, her remorse sets in, and she does what she can to repair the wrong.”

Tags : Conscience Cruelty Love Loved Sexes Unrequited Woman
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Jude the Obscure

7. “Everybody must be managed. Queens must be managed. Kings must be managed, for men want managing almost as much as women, and that's saying a good deal.”

Tags : Humor Kings Men Queens Women
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Under the Greenwood Tree

8. “People go on marrying because they can't resist natural forces, although many of them may know perfectly well that they are possibly buying a month's pleasure with a life's discomfort.”

Tags : Discomfort Force Of Nature Marriage Matrimony Nature Pleasure Self Deception
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Jude the Obscure

9. “--the ethereal, fine-nerved, sensitive girl, quite unfitted by temperament and instinct to fulfil the conditions of the matrimonial relation with Phillotson, possibly with scarce any man...”

Tags : Asexual Ethereal Matrimony Men Nerves Prude Sensitive Sex Sue Bridehead Temperament
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Jude the Obscure

10. “A strong woman who recklessly throws away her strength, she is worse than a weak woman who has never had any strength to throw away.”

Tags : Strength Woman
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Tess of the D'Urbervilles

11. “you are absolutely the most ethereal, least sensual woman I ever knew to exist without inhuman sexlessness.”

Tags : Ethereal Sensual Sue Bridehead Woman
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Jude the Obscure

12. “Well, these sad and hopeless obstacles are welcome in one sense, for they enable us to look with indifference upon the cruel satires that Fate loves to indulge in.”

Tags : Obstacles
Author : Thomas Hardy

13. “...our impulses are too strong for our judgement sometimes”

Tags : Impulse Judgement Sometimes Strong
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Tess of the D'Urbervilles

14. “Did you say the stars were worlds, Tess?""Yes.""All like ours?""I don't know, but I think so. They sometimes seem to be like the apples on our stubbard-tree. Most of them splendid and sound - a few blighted.""Which do we live on - a splendid one or a blighted one?""A blighted one.”

Tags : Stars
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Tess of the D'Urbervilles

15. “To dwellers in a wood, almost every species of tree has its voice as well as its feature.”

Tags : Tree Trees Wood
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Under the Greenwood Tree

16. “I may do some good before I am dead--be a sort of success as a frightful example of what not to do; and so illustrate a moral story.”

Tags : Example Moral Warning
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Jude the Obscure

17. “At first I did not love you, Jude; that I own. When I first knew you I merely wanted you to love me. I did not exactly flirt with you; but that inborn craving which undermines some women's morals almost more than unbridled passion--the craving to attract and captivate, regardless of the injury it may do the man--was in me; and when I found I had caught you, I was frightened. And then--I don't know how it was-- I couldn't bear to let you go--possibly to Arabella again--and so I got to love you, Jude. But you see, however fondly it ended, it began in the selfish and cruel wish to make your heart ache for me without letting mine ache for you.”

Tags : Craving Cruel Deception Flirting Heartbreaker Heartbroken Love Lying Selfish Sue Bridehead
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Jude the Obscure

18. “A novel is an impression, not an argument; and there the matter must rest.”

Tags : Argument Debate Impression Novel Writing
Author : Thomas Hardy

19. “Altogether he was one in whom no man would have seen anything to admire, and in whom no woman would have seen anything to dislike.”

Tags : Character Men Traits
Author : Thomas Hardy

20. “You concede nothing to me and I have to concede everything to you.”

Tags : Concede Confide Relationship Unfair
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Jude the Obscure

21. “He's charmed by her as if she were some fairy!" continued Arabella. "See how he looks round at her, and lets his eyes rest on her. I am inclined to think that she don't care for him quite so much as he does for her. She's not a particular warm-hearted creature to my thinking, though she cares for him pretty middling much-- as much as she's able to; and he could make her heart ache a bit if he liked to try--which he's too simple to do.”

Tags : Charm Fairy Sue Bridehead Trickster Unrequited Love
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Jude the Obscure

22. “Don't that make your bosom plim?”

Tags : Dialectics Humorous
Author : Thomas Hardy

23. “When the love-led man had ceased from his labours Bathsheba came and looked him in the face.'Gabriel, will you you stay on with me?' she said, smiling winningly, and not troubling to bring her lips quite together again at the end, because there was going to be another smile soon.'I will,' said Gabriel.And she smiled on him again.”

Tags : Bathsheba Everdene Companions Devotion Far From The Madding Crowd Friends Gabriel Oak In Love Loyalty Romantic Smile Stay With Me Thomas Hardy
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Far from the Madding Crowd

24. “Though not fearful of measurable dangers, she feared the unknown.”

Tags : Character Defining
Author : Thomas Hardy

25. “I have sometimes thought--that under the affectation of independent views you are as enslaved to the social code as any woman I know!”

Tags : Hypocrite Slave Social Code Sue Bridehead Woman
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Jude the Obscure

26. “You simply mean that you flirted outrageously with him, poor old chap, and then repented, and to make reparation, married him, though you tortured yourself to death by doing it.”

Tags : Cheat Flirt Sue Bridehead
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Jude the Obscure

27. “If the story-tellers could ha' got decency and good morals from true stories, who'd have troubled to invent parables?”

Tags : Humor Morals Parables Stories
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Under the Greenwood Tree

28. “I won't be a slave to the past. I'll love where I choose.”

Tags : Initiative Love Prejudice Selflessness
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : The Mayor of Casterbridge

29. “She might have seen that what had bowed her head so profoundly - the thought of the world's concern at her situation - was founded on illusion. She was not an existence, an experience, a passion, a structure of sensations, to anybody but herself. To all humankind besides, Tess was only a passing thought.”

Tags : Gaining Perspective Self Absorption
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Tess of the D'Urbervilles

30. “It takes two or three generations to do what I tried to do in one; and my impulses--affections--vices perhaps they should be called-- were too strong not to hamper a man without advantages; who should be as cold-blooded as a fish and as selfish as a pig to have a really good chance of being one of his country's worthies. You may ridicule me--I am quite willing that you should-- I am a fit subject, no doubt. But I think if you knew what I have gone through these last few years you would rather pity me. And if they knew"--he nodded towards the college at which the dons were severally arriving--"it is just possible they would do the same.”

Tags : College Generations Progress
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Jude the Obscure

31. “We colour and mould according to the wants within us whatever our eyes bring in.”

Tags : Ethics Morality Psychology
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Far from the Madding Crowd

32. “Eustacia Vye was the raw material of a divinity. On Olympus she would have done well with a little preparation. She had the passions and instincts which make a model goddess, that is, those which make not quite a model woman. Had it been possible for the earth and mankind to be entirely in her grasp for a while, she had handled the distaff, the spindle, and the shears at her own free will, few in the world would have noticed the change of government. There would have been the same inequality of lot, the same heaping up of favors here, of contumely there, the same generosity before justice, the same perpetual dilemmas, the same captious alteration of caresses and blows that we endure now.”

Tags : Eustacia Goddess Model Return Of The Native Woman
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : The Return of the Native

33. “Bless thy simplicity, Tess”

Tags : Characterization
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Tess of the D'Urbervilles

34. “You could sometimes see her twelfth year in her cheeks, or her ninth sparkling from her eyes; and even her fifth would flit over the curves of her mouth now and then.”

Tags : Characterization Description
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Tess of the D'Urbervilles

35. “He was to them like the poet of a new school who takes his contemporaries by storm; who is not really new, but is the first to articulate what all his listeners have felt, though but dumbly till then.”

Tags : Articulation Poet
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : The Mayor of Casterbridge

36. “Half an hour afterwards Dick emerged from the inn, and if Fancy's lips had been real cherries, probably Dick's would have appeared deeply stained.”

Tags : Kisses Love
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Under the Greenwood Tree

37. “Let truth be told - women do as a rule live through such humiliations, and regain their spirits, and again look about them with an interested eye. While there's life there's hope is a connviction not so entirely unknown to the "betrayed" as some amiable theorists would have us believe.”

Tags : Betrayed Durbyfield Hope Life Tess Of The D Urbervilles Thomas Hardy
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Tess of the D'Urbervilles

38. “He is as good as anybody in this parish! He is very particular, too, about going to church-yes, he is!''I am afeard nobody ever saw him there. I never did, certainly.''The reason of that is,' she said eagerly, 'that he goes in privately by the old tower door, just when the service commences, and sits at the back of the gallery. He told me so.'This supreme instance of Troy's goodness fell upon Gabriel's ears like the thirteenth stroke of a crazy clock. It was not only received with utter incredulity as regarded itself, but threw doubt on all the assurances that had preceded it.”

Tags : Crazy Delusional Far From The Madding Crowd Humor Lol Nonsense Thomas Hardy
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Far from the Madding Crowd

39. “If we be doomed to marry, we marry; if we be doomed to remain single we do.”

Tags : Marriage Marry Single
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Under the Greenwood Tree

40. “Though a good deal is too strange to be believed, nothing is too strange to have happened.”

Tags :
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : The Personal Notebooks Of Thomas Hardy

41. “They spoke very little of their mutual feeling; pretty phrases and warm expressions being probably unnecessary between such tried friends.”

Tags :
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Far from the Madding Crowd

42. “It appears that ordinary men take wives because possession is not possible without marriage, and that ordinary women accept husbands because marriage is not possible without possession”

Tags : Marriage Possession
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Far from the Madding Crowd

43. “When I want a broad-minded opinion for general enlightenment, distinct from special advice, I never go to a man who deals in the subject professionally. So I like the parson's opinion on law, the lawyer's on doctoring, the doctor's on business, and my business-man's . . . on morals.”

Tags : Advice Opinions
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Far from the Madding Crowd

44. “...it is foreign to a man's nature to go on loving a person when he is told that he must and shall be that person's lover. There would be a much likelier chance of his doing it if he were told not to love. If the marriage ceremony consisted in an oath and signed contract between the parties to cease loving from that day forward, in consideration of personal possession being given, and to avoid each other's society as much as possible in public, there would be more loving couples than there are now. Fancy the secret meetings between the perjuring husband and wife, the denials of having seen each other, the clambering in at bedroom windows, and the hiding in closets! There'd be little cooling then.”

Tags : Adultery Ardor Fidelity Love
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Jude the Obscure

45. “He was moderately truthful towards men, but to women lied like a Cretan-a system of ethics above all others calculated to win popularity at the first flush of admission into lively society.”

Tags : Character Far From The Madding Crowd Liar Popularity Rake Rogue Seducer Sergeant Troy Society Thomas Hardy Victorian
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Far from the Madding Crowd

46. “There's a friendly tie of some sort between music and eating.”

Tags : Eating Humor Music
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Under the Greenwood Tree

47. “Like all people who have known rough times, light-heartedness seemed to her too irrational and inconsequent to be indulged in except as a reckless dram now and then; for she had been too early habituated to anxious reasoning to drop the habit suddenly...Her triumph was tempered by circumspection, she had still that field-mouse fear of the coulter of destiny despite fair promise, which is common among the thoughtful who have suffered early from poverty and oppression.”

Tags : Elizabeth Jane Fear Life Poverty Rationality
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : The Mayor of Casterbridge

48. “Tis because we be on a blighted star, and not a sound one, isn't it Tess?”

Tags : Blighted Star
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Tess of the D'Urbervilles

49. “You would hardly think, at first, that horrid monsters lie up there waiting to be discovered by any moderately penetrating mind--monsters to which those of the oceans bear no sort of comparison."What monsters may they be?"Impersonal monsters, namely, Immensities. Until a person has thought out the stars and their inter-spaces, he has hardly learnt that there are things much more terrible than monsters of shape, namely, monsters of magnitude without known shape. Such monsters are the voids and waste places of the sky... In these our sight plunges quite beyond any twinkler we have yet visited. Those deep wells for the human mind to let itself down into, leave alone the human body! and think of the side caverns and secondary abysses to right and left as you pass on!...There is a size at which dignity begins," he exclaimed; "further on there is a size at which grandeur begins; further on there is a size at which solemnity begins; further on, a size at which awfulness begins; further on, a size at which ghastliness begins. That size faintly approaches the size of the stellar universe. So am I not right in saying that those minds who exert their imaginative powers to bury themselves in the depths of that universe merely strain their faculties to gain a new horror?”

Tags : Astronomy Cosmic Horror Monsters Science Size Universe
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Two on a Tower

50. “Some women's love of being loved is insatiable; and so, often, is their love of loving; and in the last case they may find that they can't give it continuously to the chamber-officer appointed by the bishop's license to receive it.”

Tags : Love Monogamy
Author : Thomas Hardy

51. “you dear, sweet, tantalizing phantom--hardly flesh at all; so that when I put my arms round you I almost expect them to pass through you as through air!”

Tags : Flesh Phantom Sue Bridehead Tantalizing
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Jude the Obscure

52. “Perhaps you are making a cat's paw of me with Phillotson all this time. Upon my word it almost seems so--to see you sitting up there so prim.”

Tags : Idom Jean De La Fontaine Sue Bridehead Tool Trick
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Jude the Obscure

53. “In considering what Tess was not, he overlooked that she was, and forgot that the defective can more than the entire.”

Tags : Misunderstood Pure Heart Victim
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Tess of the D'Urbervilles

54. “My weakness has always been to prefer the large intention of an unskilful artist to the trivial intention of an accomplished one: in other words, I am more interested in the high ideas of a feeble executant than in the high execution of a feeble thinker.”

Tags : Art Competence Creation Creativity Passion Skill Technique Writing
Author : Thomas Hardy

55. “You don't talk quite like a girl who has had no advantages.”

Tags : Advantages Girl Sue Bridehead Talk Way Of Speaking
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Jude the Obscure

56. “Women are never tired of bewailing man’s fickleness in love, but they only seem to snub his constancy.”

Tags : Constancy Fickleness Love
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Far from the Madding Crowd

57. “Don't take on about her, Gabriel. What difference does it make whose sweetheart she is, since she can't be yours?''That's the very thing I say to myself,' said Gabriel.”

Tags : Bathsheba Everdene Far From The Madding Crowd Gabriel Oak Rivals Thomas Hardy Unrequited Love
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Far from the Madding Crowd

58. “We ought to have lived in mental communion, and no more.”

Tags : Platonic Love
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Jude the Obscure

59. “Po tuo išoriniu kevalu - į jį pašalinis žmogus tik prabėgomis žvilgtertų kaip į nereikšmingą, tiesiog negyvą daiktą - slėpėsi pilna gyvybės siela, kuri, dar jauna būdama, skaudžiai patyrė, kokia menka yra materialinių gėrybių vertė, kokie žiaurūs žmogaus geiduliai ir kokia nepastovi meilė.”

Tags : Love Soul Suffering
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Tess of the D'Urbervilles

60. “And so, standing before the aforesaid officiator, the two swore that at every other time of their lives till death took them, they would assuredly believe, feel, and desire precisely as they had believed, felt, and desired during the few preceding weeks. What was as remarkable as the undertaking itself was the fact that nobody seemed at all surprised at what they swore.”

Tags : Marriage Promises
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Jude the Obscure

61. “Did it never strike your mind that what every woman says, some women may feel?”

Tags : Alec Feelings Strength Tess Women
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Tess of the D'Urbervilles

62. “Gabriel Oak: "It's time for you to fight your own battles... and win them too.”

Tags : Battle Hardy Inspirational Attitude Life Lessons
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Far From The Madding Crowd, Volume 1 of 3

63. “I have no fear of men, as such, nor of their books. I have mixed with them--one or two of them particularly-- almost as one of their own sex. I mean I have not felt about them as most women are taught to feel--to be on their guard against attacks on their virtue; for no average man-- no man short of a sensual savage--will molest a woman by day or night, at home or abroad, unless she invites him. Until she says by a look 'Come on' he is always afraid to, and if you never say it, or look it, he never comes.”

Tags : Books Fear Men Molest Seduction Sex Socializing Virtue Women
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Jude the Obscure

64. “Many besides Angel have learnt that the magnitude of lives is not as to their external displacements but as to their subjective experiences.”

Tags : Angel Clare Displacement Experience Importance Life
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Tess of the D'Urbervilles

65. “The next morning, when Thomasin withdrew the curtains of her bedroom window, there stood the Maypole in the middle of the greek, its top cutting into the sky. It had sprung up in the night. or rather early morning, like Jack's bean-stalk. She opened the casement to get a better view of the garlands and posies that adored it. The sweet perfume of the flowers had already spread into the surrounding air, which being free from every taint, conducted to her lips a full measure of the fragrance received from the spire of blossom in its midst. At the top of the pole were crossed hoops decked with small flowers; beneath these came a milk-white zone of Maybloom;then a zone of bluebells, then of cowslips, then of lilacs, then of ragged-rosins, daffodils and so on, till the lowest stage was reached.Thomasin noticed all these, and was delighted that the May revel was to be so near.”

Tags : Beanstalk Blossom Flowers May Maypole
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : The Return of the Native

66. “...Nameless, unknown to me as you were, I couldn't forget your voice!''For how long?''O - ever so long. Days and days.''Days and days! Only days and days? O, the heart of a man! Days and days!''But, my dear madam, I had not known you more than a day or two. It was not a full-blown love - it was the merest bud - red, fresh, vivid, but small. It was a colossal passion in embryo. It never returned.”

Tags : Love Reality Bites
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : The Woodlanders

67. “You overrate my capacity of love. I don't posess half the warmth of nature you believe me to have. An unprotected childhood in a cold world has beaten gentleness out of me.”

Tags : Coldness
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Far from the Madding Crowd

68. “There is always an inertia to be overcome in striking out a new line of conduct – not more in ourselves, it seems, than in circumscribing events, which appear as if leagued together to allow no novelties in the way of amelioration.”

Tags : Amelioration Change Inertia Influence Willpower
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Far from the Madding Crowd

69. “This good fellowship - camaraderie - usually occurring through the similarity of pursuits is unfortunately seldom super-added to love between the sexes, because men and women associate, not in their labors but in their pleasures merely. Where, however, happy circumstances permit its development, the compounded feeling proves itself to be the only love which is strong as death - that love which many waters cannot quench, nor the floods drown, besides which the passion usually called by the name is as evanescent as steam.”

Tags : Camaraderie Feelings Love Marriage Passion
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Far from the Madding Crowd

70. “You know, mistress, that I love you, and shall love you always”

Tags : Bathsheba Everdene Declarations Of Love Far From The Madding Crowd Gabriel Oak Love You Forever Loyal Romantic Steadfast Thomas Hardy
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Far from the Madding Crowd

71. “The purpose of a chronicler of moods and deeds does not require him to express his personal views upon the grave controversy above given.”

Tags : Chronicler Opinion Thoughts Views Writer
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Jude the Obscure

72. “WEATHERSThis is the weather the cuckoo likes, And so do I; When showers betumble the chestnut spikes, And nestlings fly; And the little brown nightingale bills his best, And they sit outside at 'The Traveller's Rest,' And maids come forth sprig-muslin drest, And citizens dream of the south and west, And so do I. This is the weather the shepherd shuns, And so do I; When beeches drip in browns and duns, And thresh and ply; And hill-hid tides throb, throe on throe, And meadow rivulets overflow, And drops on gate bars hang in a row, And rooks in families homeward go, And so do I.”

Tags : Countryside Observation Weather
Author : Thomas Hardy

73. “The smile on your mouth was the deadest thing.”

Tags : Smile
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Neutral Tones

74. “On a Fine Morning” in Poems of the Past and the Present (1901)WHENCE comes Solace?--Not from seeingWhat is doing, suffering, being,Not from noting Life’s conditions,Nor from heeding Time’s monitions; But in cleaving to the Dream, And in gazing at the gleam Whereby gray things golden seem.This do I this heyday, holdingShadows but as lights unfolding,As no specious show this momentWith its iris-hued embowment; But as nothing other than Part of a benignant plan; Proof that earth was made for man.”

Tags : Solace
Author : Thomas Hardy

75. “This supreme instance of Troy's goodness fell upon Gabriel's ears like the thirteenth stroke of a crazy clock.”

Tags : Crazy Far From The Madding Crowd Favorite Gabriel Oak Humor Nonsense Ridiculous Sergeant Troy Simile
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Far from the Madding Crowd

76. “I don't see why a maid should take a husband when she's bold enough to fight her own battles,”

Tags : Independent Women
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Far from the Madding Crowd

77. “A resolution to avoid an evil is seldom framed till the evil is so far advanced as to make avoidance impossible.”

Tags : Resolutions
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Far from the Madding Crowd

78. “My eyes were dazed by you for a little, and that was all.”

Tags : Love Passion
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Tess of the D'Urbervilles

79. “Within his temples felt thoughts not of woman's looks, but of stellar aspects and the configuration of constellations. Thus, to his physical attractiveness was added the attractiveness of mental inaccessibility.”

Tags : Astronomy Astronomy Nerd
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Two on a Tower

80. “Meanwhile, the trees were just as green as before; the birds sang and the sun shone as clearly now as ever. The familiar surroundings had not darkened because of her grief, nor sickened because of her pain.She might have seen that what had bowed her head so profoundly -the thought of the world's concern at her situation- was found on an illusion. She was not an existence, an experience, a passion, a structure of sensations, to anybody but herself.”

Tags : Grief Illusion Pain Tess Of The D Urbervilles Thomas Hardy
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Tess of the D'Urbervilles

81. “Eyeing her as a critic eyes a doubtful painting.”

Tags : Description Simile The Mayor Of Casterbridge Thomas Hardy
Author : Thomas Hardy

82. “Her heart longed for some ark into which it could fly and be at rest. Rough or smooth she did not care, so long as it was warm.”

Tags : Heart Metaphor The Mayor Of Casterbridge Thomas Hardy
Author : Thomas Hardy

83. “The curious double strands in Farfrae's thread of life - the commercial and the romantic - were very distinct at times. Like the colours in a variegated cord those contrasts could be seen intertwisted, yet not mingling.”

Tags : Contradictory Contrasting Farfrae Metaphor The Mayor Of Casterbridge Thomas Hardy
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : The Mayor of Casterbridge

84. “Every woman who makes a permanent impression on a man is afterwards recalled to his mind's eye as she appeared in one particular scene, which seems ordained to be her special medium of manifestation throughout all the pages of his memory.”

Tags : Hardy Memory Woman
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : A Pair of Blue Eyes

85. “Almost for the first time in his life, Troy, as he stood by this dismantled grave, wished himself another man. It is seldom that a person with much animal spirit does not feel that the fact of his life being his own is the one qualification which singles it out as a more hopeful life than that of others who may actually resemble him in every particular. Troy had felt, in his transient way, hundreds of times, that he could not envy other people their condition, because the possession of that condition would have necessitated a different personality, when he desired no other than his own. He had not minded the peculiarities of his birth, the vicissitudes of his life, the meteor-like uncertainty of all that related to him, because these appertained to the hero of his story, without whom there would have been no story at all for him; and it seemed to be only in the nature of things that matters would right themselves at some proper date and wind up well. This very morning the illusion completed its disappearance, and, as it were, all of a sudden, Troy hated himself.”

Tags : Hardy
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Far from the Madding Crowd

86. “The beggarly question of parentage--what is it, after all? What does it matter, when you come to think of it, whether a child is yours by blood or not? All the little ones of our time are collectively the children of us adults of the time, and entitled to our general care. That excessive regard of parents for their own children, and their dislike of other people's, is, like class-feeling, patriotism, save-your-own-soul-ism, and other virtues, a mean exclusiveness at bottom.”

Tags : Adoption Parental Love
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Jude the Obscure

87. “And all this while the subtle-souled girl asking herself why she was born, why sitting in a room, and blinking at the candle; why things around her had taken the shape they wore in preference to every other possible shape.”

Tags : Fate Questioning The Mayor Of Casterbridge Thomas Hardy Why
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : The Mayor of Casterbridge

88. “Yet her experience had consisted less in a series of pure disappointments than in a series of substitutions. Continually it had happened that what she had desired had not been granted her, and that what had been granted her she had not desired. So she viewed with an approach to equanimity the now cancelled days when Donald had been her undeclared lover, and wondered what unwished-for thing Heaven might send her in place of him.”

Tags : Disappointments Fate Heaven Substitutions The Mayor Of Casterbridge Thomas Hardy
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : The Mayor of Casterbridge

89. “The people who had turned their heads turned them again as the service proceeded; and at last observing her they whispered to each other. She knew what their whispers were about, grew sick at heart, and felt that she could come to church no more.”

Tags : Church Whispers
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Tess of the D'Urbervilles

90. “And they will pause just for an instant, and give a sigh to me, and think, "Poor girl!" believing they do great justice to my memory by this. But they will never, never realize that it was my single opportunity of existence, as well as of doing my duty, which they are regarding; they will not feel that what to them is but a thought, easily held in those two words of pity, "Poor girl!" was a whole life to me, as full of hours, minutes, and peculiar minutes, of hopes and dreads, smiles, whisperings, tears, as theirs: that it was my world, what is to them their world, and that in that life of mine, however much I cared for them, only as the thought I seem to them to be. Nobody can enter into another's nature truly, that's what is so grievous.”

Tags : Death Grieving Life Mourning
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Desperate Remedies

91. “Shledávám, že nad smrt je trpčí žena, jejíž srdce je plno osidel a sítí.”

Tags : Žena
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Far from the Madding Crowd

92. “And the d'Urberville knights and dames slept on in their tombs unknowing.”

Tags : Ancestors Tess Of The D Urbervilles Thomas Hardy
Author : Thomas Hardy

93. “Fancies find room in the strongest minds. Here, in a churchyard old as civilization, in the worst of weathers, was a strange woman of curious fascinations never seen elsewhere: there might be some devilry about her presence.”

Tags : Creepy The Mayor Of Casterbridge Thomas Hardy
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : The Mayor of Casterbridge

94. “It was still early, and the sun's lower limb was just free of the hill, his rays, ungenial and peering, addressed the eye rather than the touch as yet.”

Tags : Description Landscape Light
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Tess of the D'Urbervilles

95. “Then if children make so much trouble, why do people have 'em?”

Tags : Children Reproduction Trouble
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Jude the Obscure

96. “Tess's feminine hope - shall we confess it - had been so obstinately recuperative as to revive in her surreptitious visions of a domiciliary intimacy continued long enough to break down his coldness even against his judgement. Though unsophisticated in the usual sense, she was not incomplete; and it would have denoted deficiency of womanhood if she had not instinctively known what an argument lies in propinquity. Nothing else would save her, she knew, if this failed. It was wrong to hope in what was of the nature of strategy, she said to herself; yet that sort of hope she could not extinguish. His last representation had now been made, and it was, as she said, a new view. She had truly never though so far as that, and his lucid picture of possible offspring who would scorn her was one that brought deadly conviction to an honest heart which was humanitarian to its centre. Sheer experience had already taught her that, in some circumstances, there was one thing better than to lead a good life, and that was to be saved from leading any life whatever. Like all who have been previsioned by suffering, she could, in the words of M. Sully-Prudhomme, hear a penal sentence in the fiat, 'You shall be born,' particularly if addressed to potential issue or hers.”

Tags : Humanism Penitence
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Tess of the D'Urbervilles

97. “He was like one who had half fainted, and could neither recover nor complete the swoon.”

Tags : Fainting
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : The Mayor of Casterbridge

98. “Her suspense was terrible.”

Tags : Suspense The Mayor Of Casterbridge Thomas Hardy
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : The Mayor of Casterbridge

99. “If she had not been imprudence incarnate, she would not have acted as she did when she met Henchard by accident a day or two later.”

Tags : Character Imprudence The Mayor Of Casterbridge Thomas Hardy
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : The Mayor of Casterbridge

100. “She felt powerless to withstand or deny him. He was altogether too much for her, and Bathsheba seemed as one who, facing a reviving wind, finds it to blow so strongly that it stops the breath.”

Tags : Crush Love Passion Romance Smitten
Author : Thomas Hardy

101. “It was the week after Easter holidays, and he was journeying along with Smart the mare and the light spring-cart, watching the damp slopes of the hill-sides as they steamed in the warmth of the sun, which at this unsettled season shone on the grass with the freshness of an occasional inspector rather than as an accustomed proprietor.”

Tags : Grass Spring Sun
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Under the Greenwood Tree

102. “Though when at home their countenances varied with the seasons, their market faces all the year round were glowing little fires.”

Tags : Impressions M Marketing Personality
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : The Mayor of Casterbridge

103. “Suddenly an unexpected series of sounds began to be heard in this place up against the starry sky. They were the notes of Oak´s flute. It came from the direction of a small dark object under the hedge - a shephard´s hut - now presenting an outline to which an unintiated person might have been puzzled to attach either meaning or use. ... Being a man not without a frequent consciousness that there was some charm in this life he led, he stood still after looking at the sky as a useful instrument, and regarded it in an appreciative spirit, as a work of art superlatively beautiful. For a moment he seemed impressed with the speaking loneliness of the scene, or rather with the complete abstraction from all its compass of the sights and sounds of man. ... Oak´s motions, though they had a quiet energy, were slow, and their deliberateness accorded well with his occupation. Fitness being the basis of beauty, nobody could have denied tha his steady swings and turns in and about the flock had elements of grace. His special power, morally, physically, and mentally, was static. ... Oak was an intensely human man: indee, his humanity tore in pieces any politic intentions of his which bordered on strategy, and carried him on as by gravitation. A shadow in his life had always been that his flock should end in mutton - that a day could find a shepherd an arrant traitor to his gentle sheep.”

Tags : Coherence Freedom Gabriel Gabriel Oak Independence Nature Shepherd
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Far from the Madding Crowd

104. “Cultivate the art of renunciation.”

Tags : Change Distrust Renunciation
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Desperate Remedies

105. “But you shouldn't have let her. That's the only way with these fanciful women that chaw high--innocent or guilty. She'd have come round in time. We all do! Custom does it! It's all the same in the end! However, I think she's fond of her man still--whatever he med be of her. You were too quick about her. I shouldn't have let her go! I should have kept her chained on-- her spirit for kicking would have been broke soon enough! There's nothing like bondage and a stone-deaf taskmaster for taming us women. Besides, you've got the laws on your side. Moses knew.”

Tags : Fanciful Girl Husband Spoiled Strictness
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Jude the Obscure

106. “Men thin away to insignificance and oblivion quite as often by not making the most of good spirits when they have them as by lacking good spirits when they are indispensable. Gabriel lately, for the first time since his prostration by misfortune, had been independent in thought and vigorous in action to a marked extent-conditions which, powerless without an opportunity as an opportunity without them is barren, would have given him a sure lift upwards when the favourable conjunction should have occurred. But this incurable loitering beside Bathsheba Everdene stole his time ruinously. The spring tides were going by without floating him off, and the neap might soon come which could not.”

Tags : Bathsheba Everdene Far From The Madding Crowd Gabriel Oak Love Selfless Love Thomas Hardy
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Far from the Madding Crowd

107. “It appears that ordinary men take wives because possession is not possible without marriage, and that ordinary women accept husbands because marriage is not possible without possession; with totally differing aims the method is the same on both sides. But the understood incentive on the woman's part was wanting here. Besides, Bathsheba's position as absolute mistress of a farm and house was a novel one, and the novelty had not yet begun to wear off.”

Tags : Bathsheba Everdene Far From The Madding Crowd Feminism Gender Politics Independence Marriage Men And Women Sexual Politics Thomas Hardy Victorian
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Far from the Madding Crowd

108. “I have been thinking," she continued, still in the tone of one brimful of feeling, "that the social moulds civilization fits us into have no more relation to our actual shapes than the conventional shapes of the constellations have to the real star-patterns. I am called Mrs. Richard Phillotson, living a calm wedded life with my counterpart of that name. But I am not really Mrs. Richard Phillotson, but a woman tossed about, all alone, with aberrant passions, and unaccountable antipathies...”

Tags : Jude The Obscure Sue Bridehead
Author : Thomas Hardy

109. “All the while she wondered if any strange good thing might come of her being in her ancestral land; and some spirit within her rose automatically as the sap in the twigs. It was unexpected youth, surging up anew after its temporary check, and bringing with it hope, and the invincible instinct towards self-delight.”

Tags : Home Spring Youth
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Tess of the D'Urbervilles

110. “On the morning appointed for her departure Tess awoke before dawn — at the marginal minute of the dark when the grove is still mute save for one prophetic bird, who sings with a clear-voiced conviction that he at least knows the correct time of day, the rest preserving silence, as if equally convinced that he is mistaken.”

Tags : Nature Realism
Author : Thomas Hardy

111. “To be loved to madness--such was her great desire. Love was to her the one cordial which could drive away the eating loneliness of her days. And she seemed to long for the abstraction called passionate love more than for any particular lover.”

Tags : Disgruntlement Dissatisfaction Drama Queen Self Delusion Unhappiness
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Return of the Native

112. “On the hearth, in front of a back-brand to give substance, blazed a fire of thorns, that crackled 'like the laughter of the fool.'Nineteen persons were gathered here. Of these, five women, wearing gowns of various bright hues, sat in chairs along the wall; girls shy and not shy filled the window-bench; four men, including Charley Jake the hedge-carpenter, Elijah New the parish-clerk, and John Pitcher, a neighboring dairyman, the shepherd's father-in-law, lolled in the settle; a young man and maid, who were blushing over tentative pourparlers on a life companionship, sat beneath the corner-cupboard; and an elderly engaged man of fifty or upward moved restlessly about from spots where his betrothed was not to the spot where she was. Enjoyment was pretty general, and so much the more prevailed in being unhampered by conventional restrictions. Absolute confidence in each other's good opinion begat perfect ease, while the finishing stroke of manner, amounting to a truly princely serenity, was lent to the majority by the absence of any expression or trait denoting that they wished to get on in the world, enlarge their minds, or do any eclipsing thing whatever - which nowadays so generally nips the bloom and bonhomie of all except the two extremes of the social scale.("The Three Strangers")”

Tags : Party Social Norms
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Great Tales of Terror and the Supernatural

113. “A Cathedral Façade at MidnightAlong the sculptures of the western wallI watched the moonlight creeping:It moved as if it hardly moved at allInch by inch thinly peepingRound on the pious figures of freestone, broughtAnd poised there when the Universe was wroughtTo serve its centre, Earth, in mankind’s thought.The lunar look skimmed scantly toe, breast, arm,Then edged on slowly, slightly,To shoulder, hand, face; till each austere formWas blanched its whole length brightlyOf prophet, king, queen, cardinal in state,That dead men’s tools had striven to simulate;And the stiff images stood irradiate.A frail moan from the martyred saints there setMid others of the erectionAgainst the breeze, seemed sighings of regretAt the ancient faith’s rejectionUnder the sure, unhasting, steady stressOf Reason’s movement, making meaningless.”

Tags : Cathedrals Faith Futility Moonlight Mortality Night Religion Salisbury
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Collected Poems

114. “Tess was awake before dawn — at the marginal minute of the dark when the grove is still mute, save for one prophetic bird who sings with a clear-voiced conviction that he at least knows the correct time of day, the rest preserving silence as if equally convinced that he is mistaken.”

Tags : Bird Dawn Nature
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Tess of the D'Urbervilles

115. “He had just reached the time of life at which 'young' is ceasing to be the prefix of 'man' in speaking of one. He was at the brightest period of masculine life, for his intellect and emotions were clearly separate; he had passed the time during which the influence of youth indiscriminately mingles them in the character of impulse, and he had not yet arrived at the state wherin they become united again, in the character of prejudice, by the influence of a wife and family.In short he was twenty-eight and a bachelor.”

Tags : Impulse Intellect Masculinity Youth Age
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Far from the Madding Crowd

116. “[She] soon perceived that as she walked in the flock, sometimes with this one, sometimes with that, that the fresh night air was producing staggerings and serpentine courses among the men who had partaken too freely; some of the more careless women were also wandering in their gait. . . . Yet however terrestrial and lumpy their appearance just now to the mean unglamoured eye, to themselves the case was different. They followed the road with a sensation that they were soaring along in a supporting medium, possessed of original and profound thoughts, themselves and surrounding nature forming an organism of which all the parts harmoniously and joyously interpenetrated each other. They were as sublime as the moon and stars above them, and the moon and stars were as ardent as they.”

Tags : Alcohol Women
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Tess of the D'Urbervilles

117. “Tess Durbeyfield, in quell'epoca della sua vita, era solo un recipiente di emozioni non ancora colorite dall'esperienza”

Tags : Romance Novels Victorians
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Tess of the D'Urbervilles

118. “If he could only prevent himself growing up! He did not want to be a man.”

Tags : Childhood Forever Young Growing Up
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Jude the Obscure

119. “Jude leaped out of arm's reach, and walked along the trackway weeping--not from the pain, though that was keen enough; not from the perception of the flaw in the terrestrial scheme, by which what was good for God's birds was bad for God's gardener; but with the awful sense that he had wholly disgraced himself before he had been a year in the parish, and hence might be a burden to his great-aunt for life.”

Tags : Classics God
Author : Thomas Hardy

120. “Such a women as you a hundred men always convet - your eyes will bewitch scores on scores into an unvailing fancy for you - you can only marry one of that many...The rest may try to get over their passion with more or less success. But all of these men will be saddened. And not only those ninety-nine men, but the ninety-nine women they might have married are saddened with them. There's my tale. That's why I say that a woman so charming as yourself, Miss Everdene, is hardly a blessing to her race.”

Tags : Classics Love Quotes
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Far from the Madding Crowd

121. “Such women as you a hundred men always convet - your eyes will only bewitch scores on scores into the unvailing fancy for you - you can only marry one of that many. Out of these say twenty will will endeavour to drown the bitterness of despised love in drink; twenty more will mope away their lives without a wish or attempt to make a mark in the world, because they have no ambition apart from their attachment to you; twenty more - the suspectible person myself possibly among them - will be always draggling after you, getting where they may just see you, doing desperate things. Men are such constant fools! The rest may try to get over their passion with more or less success. But all of these men will be saddened. And not only those ninety-nine men, but the ninety-nine women they might have married are saddened with them. There's my tale. That's why I say that a woman so charming as yourself, Miss Everdene, is hardly a blessing to her race (Ch. 26)”

Tags : Classics Love Quotes
Author : Thomas Hardy

122. “There were a few middle-aged and even elderly women in the train, their silver-wiry hair and wrinkled faces, scourged by time and trouble, having almost a grotesque, certainly a pathetic, appearance in such a jaunty situation. In a true view, perhaps, there was more to be gathered and told of each anxious and experienced one, to whom the years were drawing nigh when she should say, 'I have no pleasure in them', than of her juvenile comrades. But let the elder be passed over here for those under whose bodices the life throbbed quick and warm.”

Tags : Classics
Author : Thomas Hardy

123. “You have never loved me as I love you--never--never! Yours is not a passionate heart--your heart does not burn in a flame! You are, upon the whole, a sort of fay, or sprite-- not a woman!”

Tags : Cold Heart Unrequited Love
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Jude the Obscure

124. “What a grand revenge you have taken! I saw you innocent, and I deceived you. Four years after, you find me a Christian enthusiast; you then work upon me, perhaps to my complete perdition! But Tess, my coz, as I used to call you, this is only my way of talking, and you must not look so horribly concerned. Of course you have done nothing except retain your pretty face and shapely figure. I saw it on the rick before you saw me—that tight pinafore-thing sets it off, and that wing-bonnet—you field-girls should never wear those bonnets if you wish to keep out of danger.”

Tags : Temptation
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Tess of the D'Urbervilles

125. “I. At TeaTHE kettle descants in a cosy drone,And the young wife looks in her husband's face,And then in her guest's, and shows in her ownHer sense that she fills an envied place;And the visiting lady is all abloom,And says there was never so sweet a room.And the happy young housewife does not knowThat the woman beside her was his first choice,Till the fates ordained it could not be so....Betraying nothing in look or voiceThe guest sits smiling and sips her tea,And he throws her a stray glance yearningly.”

Tags : Tea
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Satires of Circumstances: Lyrics and Reveries with Miscellaneous Pieces

126. “The Scotchman seemed hardly the same Farfrae who had danced with her, and walked with her, in a delicate poise between love and friendship - that period in the history of a love when alone it can be said to be unalloyed with pain.”

Tags : Courtship Love Relationships The Mayor Of Casterbridge Thomas Hardy
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : The Mayor of Casterbridge

127. “She had the hard, half-apathetic expression of one who deems anything possible at the hands of time and chance, except perhaps fair play”

Tags : Acceptance Fate Powerlessness Serenity Surrender
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : The Mayor of Casterbridge

128. “Love is an utterly bygone, sorry, worn-out, miserable thing with me- for him or anyone else.”

Tags : Lovely Words
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Far from the Madding Crowd

129. “It is a difficult question, my friends, for any young man-- that question I had to grapple with, and which thousands are weighing at the present moment in these uprising times-- whether to follow uncritically the track he finds himself in, without considering his aptness for it, or to consider what his aptness or bent may be, and re-shape his course accordingly. I tried to do the latter, and I failed. But I don't admit that my failure proved my view to be a wrong one, or that my success would have made it a right one; though that's how we appraise such attempts nowadays--I mean, not by their essential soundness, but by their accidental outcomes. If I had ended by becoming like one of these gentlemen in red and black that we saw dropping in here by now, everybody would have said: 'See how wise that young man was, to follow the bent of his nature!' But having ended no better than I began they say: 'See what a fool that fellow was in following a freak of his fancy!”

Tags : Future Society Young Men
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Jude the Obscure

130. “It was then that the ecstasy and the dream began, in which emotion was the matter of the universe, and matter but an adventitious intrusion likely to hinder you from spinning where you wanted to spin.”

Tags : Dreams Senses
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Tess of the D'Urbervilles

131. “That innate love of melody, which she had inherited from her ballad-singing mother, gave the simplest music a power which could well-nigh drag her heart out of her bosom at times.”

Tags : Music Senses
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Tess of the D'Urbervilles

132. “A sort of halo, an occidental glow, came over life then. Troubles and other realities took on themselves a metaphysical impalpability, sinking to mere mental phenomena for serene contemplation, and no longer stood as pressing concretions which chafed body and soul.”

Tags : Senses
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Tess of the D'Urbervilles

133. “I am only a peasant by position, not by nature!”

Tags : Courage Honour Nobility Pride Tess
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Tess of the D'Urbervilles

134. “Možda je spoznala, da je ono, što je tako duboko pognulo njezinu glavu - misao, da će se svijet obazirati na njezin položaj - bilo osnovano na iluziji. Ona nije bila život, iskustvo, strast ili skup osjećaja, ni za koga, nego za samu sebe. Za sve ljude oko sebe Tessa je bila samo prolazna misao. Ako ona učini sebe nesretnom, za cijeli život, danju i noću, za njih to znači samo: "Ah, ona je nesretna." Ako pokuša da bude vesela, da odbaci sve brige, da uživa u danjem svjetlu, cvijeću, djetetu, za njih će to samo biti misao "Ah, ona dobro podnosi svoju nesreću.”

Tags : Tess
Author : Thomas Hardy

135. “Pourquoi ne m'avez-vous pas dit qu'il y avait du danger avec les hommes?"Tess”

Tags : Anastasia Steele Tess
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Tess of the D'Urbervilles

136. “She was of the stuff of which great men's mothers are made. She was indispensable to high generation, feared at tea-parties, hated in shops, and loved at crises.”

Tags : Mothers Women
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Far from the Madding Crowd

137. “His parted lips were lips which spoke, not of love, but of millions of miles; those were eyes which habitually gazed, not into the depths of other eyes, but into other worlds. Within his temples dwelt thoughts, not of woman's looks, but of stellar aspects and the configuration of constellations.”

Tags : Astronomy
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Two on a Tower

138. “At night, when human discords and harmonies are hushed, . . . there is nothing to moderate the blow with which the infinitely great, the stellar universe, strikes down upon the infinitely little, the mind of the beholder . . . Having got closer to immensity than their fellow-creatures, they saw at once its beauty and its frightfulness. They more and more felt the contrast between their own tiny magnitudes and those among which they had recklessly plunged, till they were oppressed with the presence of a vastness they could not cope with even as an idea, and which hung about them like a nightmare.”

Tags : Astronomy
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Two on a Tower

139. “The inspection of these chasms brought him a second pulsation of that old horror which he had used to describe to Viviette as produced in him by bottomlessness in the north heaven. The ghostly finger of limitless vacancy touched him now on the other side.”

Tags : Astronomy
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Two on a Tower

140. “I think astronomy is a bad study for you. It makes you feel human insignificance too plainly.”

Tags : Astronomy Human Insignificance
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Two on a Tower

141. “Hence, when his name was casually mentioned by neighboring yeomen, the listener said, "Ah, Clym Yeobright: what is he doing now?' When the instinctive question about a person is, What is he doing? it is felt that he will not be found to be, like most of us, doing nothing in particular. There is an indefinite sense that he must be invading some region of singularity , good or bad. The devout home is that he is doing well. The secret faith is that he is making a mess of it...So the subject recurred: if he were making a fortune and a name, so much the better for him, if he were making a tragical figure in the world, so much the better for a narrative”

Tags : Community Gossip Life Talk
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : The Return of the Native

142. “She had learned the lesson of renunciation and was as familiar with the wreck of each day's wishes as with the diurnal setting of the sun.”

Tags : Contentment Disappointment Peace Of Mind Planning
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : The Mayor of Casterbridge

143. “Ich finde, wenn Kinder geboren werden, die man nicht haben will, dann sollten sie gleich tot gemacht werden, ehe sie Seelen kriegen, und man sollte sie gar nicht groß werden und herum laufen lassen!”

Tags : Kinder
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Jude the Obscure

144. “I look into my glass,And view my wasting skin,And say, 'Would God it came to passMy heart had shrunk as thin!”

Tags : Heartache Old Age
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Chosen Poems of Thomas Hardy

145. “But you are too lovely even to care to be kind as others are.”

Tags : Bathsheba Everdene Beauty Far From The Madding Crowd Kindness Sergeant Troy Thomas Hardy Vanity
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Far from the Madding Crowd

146. “If I really seem vain, it is that I am only vain in my ways—not in my heart. The worst women are those vain in their hearts, and not in their ways.”

Tags : Vanity Women
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : A Pair of Blue Eyes

147. “Better to choose a limit capriciously than to have none.”

Tags : Choices Life Lessons Limits
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : A Pair of Blue Eyes

148. “Don't for God's sake speak as saint to sinner, but as you yourself to me myself - poor me!”

Tags : Literature Quotes Tess Of The D Urbervilles Thomas Hardy
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Thomas Hardy: Tess of the D'Urbervilles; The Mayor of Casterbridge; Far from the Madding Crowd

149. “but she remained more or less and ideal character, about whose form he began to weave curious and fantastic day-dreams.”

Tags : Daydreams Love
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Jude the Obscure

150. “This is the weather the cuckoo likes, And so do I; When showers betumble the chestnut spikes, And nestlings fly”

Tags : Nature Rain Weather
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : The Complete Poems

151. “Was once lost always lost really true of chastity?”

Tags : Lost Women
Author : Thomas Hardy

152. “She might have seen that what had bowed her head so profoundly - the thought of the world's concern at her situation - was founded on an illusion. She was not an existence, an experience, a passion, a structure of sensations, to anybody but herself. To all humankind besides Tess was only a passing thought. Even to friends she was no more than a frequently passing thought. If she made herself miserable the livelong night and day it was only this much to them - 'Ah,she makes herself unhappy.' If she tried to be cheerful, to dismiss all care, to take pleasure in the daylight, the flowers, the baby, she could only be this idea to them - 'Ah, she bears it very well.' Moreover, alone in a desert island would she have been wretched at what had happened to her? Not greatly. If she could but have been just created, to discover herself as a spouseless mother, with no experience of life except as the parent of a nameless child, would the position have caused her to despair? No, she would have taken it calmly, and found pleasures therein. Most of the misery had been generated by her conventional aspect, and not by her innate sensations.”

Tags : Humanism
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Tess of the D'Urbervilles

153. “I forgot the defective can be more than the whole”

Tags : Reflective
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Tess of the D'Urbervilles

154. “Some of the dairy people, who were also out of doors on the first Sunday evening after their engagement, heard her impulsive speeches, ecstasized to fragments, though they were too far off to hear the words discoursed; noted the spasmodic catch in her remarks, broken into syllables by the leapings of her heart, as she walked leaning on his arm; her contented pauses, the occassional laugh upon which her soul seemed to ride - the laugh of a woman in company with the man she loves and has won from all other women - unlike anything else in nature. They marked the buoyancy of her tread, like the skim of a bird which has not yet alighted.”

Tags : Lovers Walking
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Tess of the D'Urbervilles

155. “When women are secret they are secret indeed; and more often then not they only begin to be secret with the advent of a second lover.”

Tags : Lovers Relationships Secrets Women
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : A Pair of Blue Eyes

156. “There's more for us to think about in that one little hungry heart than in all the stars of the sky…”

Tags : Jude
Author : Thomas Hardy

157. “He knew he should go to see her again, according to her invitation. Those earnest men he read of, the saints, whom Sue, with gentle irreverence, called his demi-gods, would have shunned such encounters if they doubted their own strength. But he could not. He might fast and pray during the whole interval, but the human was more powerful in him than the Divine.”

Tags : Jude Jude The Obscure
Author : Thomas Hardy

158. “How very lovable her face was to him. Yet there was nothing ethereal about it; all was real vitality, real warmth, real incarnation. And it was in her mouth that this culminated. Eyes almost as deep and speaking he had seen before, and cheeks perhaps as fair; brows as arched, a chin and throat almost as shapely; her mouth he had seen nothing to equal on the face of the earth. To a young man with the least fire in him that little upward lift in the middle of her red top lip was distracting, infatuating, maddening. He had never before seen a woman’s lips and teeth which forced upon his mind with such persistent iteration the old Elizabethan simile of roses filled with snow.Perfect, he, as a lover, might have called them off-hand. But no — they were not perfect. And it was the touch of the imperfect upon the would-be perfect that gave the sweetness, because it was that which gave the humanity.”

Tags : Beauty Imperfection Love Perfection
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Tess of the D'Urbervilles

159. “I know women are taught by other women that they must never admit the full truth to a man. But the highest form of affection is based on full sincerity on both sides. Not being men, these women don't know that in looking back on those he has had tender relations with, a man's heart returns closest to her who was the soul of truth in her conduct. The better class of man, even if caught by airy affectations of dodging and parrying, is not retained by them. A Nemesis attends the woman who plays the game of elusiveness too often, in the utter contempt for her that, sooner or later, her old admirers feel; under which they allow her to go unlamented to her grave.”

Tags : Love Trust
Author : Thomas Hardy

160. “There was hardly a touch of earth in her love for Clare. To her sublime trustfulness he was all that goodness could be—knew all that a guide, philosopher, and friend should know. She thought every line in the contour of his person the perfection of masculine beauty, his soul the soul of a saint, his intellect that of a seer. The wisdom of her love for him, as love, sustained her dignity; she seemed to be wearing a crown. The compassion of his love for her, as she saw it, made her lift up her heart to him in devotion. He would sometimes catch her large, worshipful eyes, that had no bottom to them looking at him from their depths, as if she saw something immortal before her.”

Tags : Devotion Dignity Love
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Tess of the D'Urbervilles

161. “...there was alienation in the standing consciousness that his squareness would not fit the round hole that had been prepared for him.”

Tags : Family Nonconformity
Author : Thomas Hardy

162. “She had not heard him enter, and hardly realized his presence there. She was yawning, and he saw the red interior of her mouth as if it had been a snake's. She had stretched one arm so high above her coiled-up cable of hair that he could see its satin delicacy above the sunburn; her face was flushed with sleep, and her eyelids hung heavy over their pupils. The brim-fulness of her nature breathed from her. It was a moment when a woman's soul is more incarnate than at any other time; when the most spiritual beauty bespeaks itself flesh; and sex takes the outside place in the presentation.”

Tags : Beauty Sleep
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Tess of the D'Urbervilles

163. “He had been held to her by a beautiful thread which it pained him to spoil by breaking, rather than by a chain he could not break.”

Tags : Bathsheba Everdene Classic Far From The Madding Crowd Fiction Gabriel Oak Romance
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Far from the Madding Crowd

164. “Men thin away to insignificance and oblivion quite as often by not making the most of good spirits when they have them as by lacking good spirits when they are indispensable.”

Tags : Far From The Madding Crowd Thomas Hardy
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Far from the Madding Crowd

165. “I shall be up before you are awake; I shall be afield before you are up; and I shall have breakfasted before you are afield. In short, I shall astonish you all.”

Tags : Far From The Madding Crowd Fiction Romance Thomas Hardy
Author : Thomas Hardy

166. “It was a fatal omission of Boldwood's that he had never once told her she was beautiful.”

Tags : Far From The Madding Crowd Thomas Hardy
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Far from the Madding Crowd

167. “The sky was clear -- remarkably clear -- and the twinkling of all the stars seemed to be but throbs of one body, timed by a common pulse.”

Tags : Far From The Madding Crowd
Author : Thomas Hardy

168. “Oh, it is true enough. I may as well be hung for a sheep as a lamb (an old country saying, not of much account, but it will do for a rough soldier), and so I will speak my mind, regardless of your pleasure, and without hoping or intending to get your pardon. Why, Miss Everdene, it is in this manner that your good looks may do more harm than good in the world." The sergeant looked down the mead in critical abstraction. "Probably some one man on an average falls in love with each ordinary woman. She can marry him: he is content, and leads a useful life. Such women as you a hundred men always covet—your eyes will bewitch scores on scores into an unavailing fancy for you—you can only marry one of that many. Out of these say twenty will endeavour to drown the bitterness of despised love in drink; twenty more will mope away their lives without a wish or attempt to make a mark in he world, because they have no ambition apart from their attachment to you; twenty more—the susceptible person myself possibly among them—will be always draggling after you, getting where they may just see you, doing desperate things. Men are such constant fools! The rest may try to get over their passion with more or less success. But all these men will be saddened. And not only those ninety-nine men, but the ninety-nine women they might have married are saddened with them. There's my tale. That's why I say that a woman so charming as yourself, Miss Everdene, is hardly a blessing to her race.”

Tags : Far From The Madding Crowd
Author : Thomas Hardy

169. “He can blow the flute very well-that 'a can,' said a young married man, who having no individuality worth mentioning was known as 'Susan Tall's husband.”

Tags : Far From The Madding Crowd Funny Character Humor Thomas Hardy
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Far from the Madding Crowd

170. “Idiosyncrasy and vicissitude had combined to stamp Sergeant Troy as an exceptional being.”

Tags : Character Far From The Madding Crowd Sergeant Troy Thomas Hardy
Author : Thomas Hardy

171. “The difference between love and respect was markedly shown in her conduct. Bathsheba had spoken of her interest in Boldwood with the greatest freedom to Liddy, but she only communed with her own heart concerning Troy.”

Tags : Far From The Madding Crowd Thomas Hardy
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Far from the Madding Crowd

172. “There are considerations even before my consideration for you; reparations to be made-ties you know nothing of. If you repent of marrying, so do I.”

Tags : Bathsheba Everdene Far From The Madding Crowd Sergeant Troy Thomas Hardy
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Far from the Madding Crowd

173. “She tried to argue, and tell him that he had mixed in his dull brain two matters, theology and morals, which in the primitive days of mankind had been quite distinct.”

Tags : Morality Theology
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Tess of the D'Urbervilles

174. “The yard was a little centre of regeneration. Here, with keen edges and smooth curves, were forms in the exact likeness of those he had seen abraded and time-eaten on the walls. These were the ideas in modern prose which the lichened colleges presented in old poetry. Even some of those antiques might have been called prose when they were new. They had done nothing but wait, and had become poetical. How easy to the smallest building; how impossible to most men.”

Tags : Architecture Buildings Poetry
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Jude the Obscure

175. “Life with a man is more businesslike after it, and money matters work better. And then, you see, if you have rows, and he turns you out of doors, you can get the law to protect you, which you can't otherwise, unless he half-runs you through with a knife, or cracks your noddle with a poker. And if he bolts away from you--I say it friendly, as woman to woman, for there's never any knowing what a man med do-- you'll have the sticks o' furniture, and won't be looked upon as a thief.”

Tags : Law Marriage Money
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Jude the Obscure

176. “So do flux and reflux--the rhythm of change--alternate and persist in everything under the sky.”

Tags : Change Flux Reflux Truth Wisdom
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Tess of the D'Urbervilles

177. “She had been too early habituated to anxious reasoning to drop the habit suddenly.”

Tags : Anxiety Conditioning Faith Habit Worry
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : The Mayor of Casterbridge

178. “But some women only require an emergency to make them fit for one.”

Tags : Emergencies Women
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Far from the Madding Crowd

179. “She went indoors in that peculiar state of misery which is not exactly grief, and which especially attends the dawnings of reason in the latter days of an ill-judged, transient love. To be conscious that the end of the dream is approaching, and yet has not absolutely come, is one of the most wearisome as well as the most curious stages along the course between the beginning of a passion and its end.”

Tags : Love Misery
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : The Return of the Native

180. “Done because we are too many.”

Tags : Children Jude The Obscure Suicide Thomas Hardy
Author : Thomas Hardy

181. “He Looked and smelt like Autumn's very brother, his face being sunburnt to wheat-colour, his eyes blue as corn-flowers, his sleeves and leggings dyed with fruit-stains, his hands clammy with the sweet juice of apples, his hat sprinkled with pips, and everywhere about him the sweet atmosphere of cider which at its first return each season has such an indescribable fascination for those who have been born and bred among the orchards.”

Tags : Giles Winterbourne The Woodlanders Thomas Hardy
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : The Woodlanders

182. “Human beings, in their generous endeavour to construct a hypothesis that shall not degrade a First Cause, have always hesitated to conceive a dominant power of lower moral quality than their own; and, even while they sit down and weep by the waters of Babylon, invent excuses for the oppression which prompts their tears.”

Tags : Return Of The Native Thomas Hardy
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Return of the Native Volume I

183. “But time is short, and science is infinite...”

Tags : Infinite Life Science Time
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Two on a Tower

184. “When you've made up your mind to marry, take the first respectable body that comes to hand - she's as good as any other; they be all alike in groundwork: 'tis only in the flourishes there's a difference.”

Tags : Marriage Marriage Advice Wife Wives
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Under the Greenwood Tree

185. “But I wish to be enlightened.''Let me caution you against it.''Is enlightenment on the subject, then, so terrible?''Yes, indeed.'She laughingly declared that nothing could have so piqued her curiosity as his statement.”

Tags : Caution Enlightenment
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Two on a Tower

186. “But no one came. Because no one ever does.”

Tags : Depressingly Honest
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Jude the Obscure

187. “The real sin ma'am, in my mind lies in thinking of ever wedding with a man you don't love honest and true.”

Tags : Love Wedding
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Far from the Madding Crowd

188. “The roof was a gymnasium for the winds”

Tags : Descriptive Quote Victorian Novel
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Tess of the D'Urbervilles

189. “Tess was carried along the wings of the hours”

Tags : Descriptive Quote Victorian Novel
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Tess of the D'Urbervilles

190. “Thoroughly convinced of the impossibility of his own suit, a high resolve constrained him not to injure that of another. This is a lover's most stoical virtue, as the lack of it is a lover's most venial sin.”

Tags : Stoicism
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Far from the Madding Crowd

191. “So passed away Sorrow the Undesired--that intrusive creature, that bastard gift of shameless Nature who respects not the social law; a waif to whom eternal Time had been a matter of days merely, who knew not that such things as years and centuries ever were; to whom the cottage interior was the universe, the week's weather climate, new-born babyhood human existence, and the instinct to suck human knowledge.”

Tags : Child Death
Author : Thomas Hardy

192. “One thing he certainly was— sincere.”

Tags : Sincere
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Tess of the D'Urbervilles

193. “Byla to noc, kdy i nejveselejšího člověka může navštívit lítost, aniž působí příliš nepřiměřeně; kdy se citlivým osobám láska mění v úzkost, naděje klesá v pochybnost a víra v naději.”

Tags : Láska Naděje
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Far from the Madding Crowd

194. “Láska, třebaže znamená zvýšené city, znamená i sníženou rozumovou schopnost.”

Tags : Láska
Author : Thomas Hardy

195. “It was part of his nature to extenuate nothing and live on as one of his own worst accusers.”

Tags : Forgiveness Self Reproach Sin
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : The Mayor of Casterbridge

196. “I had a neat stock of fixed opinions, but they dropped away one by one; and the further I get the less sure I am. I doubt if I have anything more for my present rule of life than following inclinations which do me and nobody else any harm, and actually give pleasure to those I love best. There, gentlemen, since you wanted to know how I was getting on, I have told you. Much good may it do you! I cannot explain further here. I perceive there is something wrong somewhere in our social formulas: what it is can only be discovered by men or women with greater insight than mine--if, indeed, they ever discover it-- at least in our time. 'For who knoweth what is good for man in this life?--and who can tell a man what shall be after him under the sun?”

Tags : Future Life Plans Youth
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Jude the Obscure

197. “Misfortune is a fine opiate to personal terror.”

Tags : Misfortune
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Far from the Madding Crowd

198. “It is difficult for a woman to define her feelings in language which is chiefly made by men to express theirs.”

Tags : Women
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : Far from the Madding Crowd

199. “Fundamental belief consoled him for superficial irony.”

Tags : Cynicism Disappointment Disillusionment Faith Sovereignty Of God
Author : Thomas Hardy
Source : The Mayor of Casterbridge

200. “Being a man not without a frequent consciousness that there was some charm in this life he led, he stood still after looking at the sky as a useful instrument, and regarded it in an appreciative spirit, as a work of art superlatively beautiful. For a moment he seemed impressed with the speaking loneliness of the scene, or rather with the complete abstraction from all its compass of the sights and sounds of man. Human shapes, interferences, troubles, and joys were all as if they were not, and there seemed to be on the shaded hemisphere of the globe no sentient being save himself; he could fancy them all gone round to the sunny side.”

Tags : Beauty Nature
Author : Thomas Hardy