Karen Swallow Prior Quotes

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1. “…the rising movement of romanticism, with its characteristic idealism, one that tended toward a black-and-white view of the world based on those ideas, preferred for different reasons that women remain untinged by “masculine” traits of learning. Famous romantic writers such as Lord Byron, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and William Hazlitt criticized the bluestockings. …and Hazlitt declared his 'utter aversion to Bluestockingism … I do not care a fig for any woman that knows even what an author means.' Because of the tremendous influence that romanticism gained over the cultural mind-set, the term bluestocking came to be a derogatory term applied to learned, pedantic women, particularly conservative ones. ... Furthermore, learned women did not fit in with the romantic notion of a damsel in distress waiting to be rescued by a knight in shining armor any more than they fit in with the antirevolutionary fear of progress.”

Tags : Anti Education Anti Female Education Author Bluestocking Critics Culture Education Fear Of Progress Female Education Female Empowerment French Revolution Hannah More Idealism Intelligence Knowledge Learning Lord Byron Romantic Era Romanticism Shocking Shocking Criticism William Hazlitt Women Writer
Source : Fierce Convictions: The Extraordinary Life of Hannah More—Poet, Reformer, Abolitionist

2. “Rather than majoring in frivolities, women should be educated in useful subjects and 'be furnished with a stock of ideas, and principles, and qualifications, and habits, ready to be applied and appropriated…' - Hannah More”

Tags : Dignity Education Female Female Education Frivolity Habits Ideas Intellect Principles Women
Source : Fierce Convictions: The Extraordinary Life of Hannah More—Poet, Reformer, Abolitionist

3. “God can carry on his own work, though all such poor tools as I were broken.”

Tags : Brokeness Gods Power Gods Work Hannah More Tools
Source : Fierce Convictions: The Extraordinary Life of Hannah More—Poet, Reformer, Abolitionist

4. “Even in their reading, More charged, too many women were prone to superficiality. In search of a passing knowledge of books and authors, many read anthologies of excerpted works, that selected the brightest passages but left out deeper contexts—eighteenth-century Reader’s Digest were quite popular. More cautioned against a habit she viewed as cultivating a taste only for “delicious morsels,” one that spits out “every thing which is plain.” Good books, in contrast, require good readers: “In all well-written books, there is much that is good which is not dazzling; and these shallow critics should be taught, that it is for the embellishment of the more tame and uninteresting parts of his work, that the judicious poet commonly reserves those flowers, whose beauty is defaced when they are plucked from the garland into which he had so skillfully woven them.”

Tags : Books Education Hannah More Intelligence Knowledge Reading Superficial Women
Source : Fierce Convictions: The Extraordinary Life of Hannah More—Poet, Reformer, Abolitionist

5. “…mischief, …arises not from our living in the world, but from the world living in us; occupying our hearts, and monopolizing our affections.”

Tags : Affection Heart Humanity Inherent Evil Need Sin Nature Worldliness
Source : Fierce Convictions: The Extraordinary Life of Hannah More—Poet, Reformer, Abolitionist

6. “…evangelicals were instrumental in advancing the ideal of companionate marriage, one built on shared faith and mutual affection, a revolutionary notion in an era in which forced marriages were a not-so-distant memory.”

Tags : Affection Companionship Equality Evangelicals Forced Marriage Hannah More Marriage Mutual Respect
Source : Fierce Convictions: The Extraordinary Life of Hannah More—Poet, Reformer, Abolitionist

7. “The topic was eloquence, something Christians had been conflicted about since the first-century church when Paul wrote that in bringing the gospel, he did not come with “eloquence.” A few centuries later, Saint Augustine wrestled with the value of eloquence, associating it with his pagan background and training in Greek rhetoric while simultaneously employing it winsomely in his Christian writings. Such suspicion of beauty and form, whether in art, literature, speech, or human flesh, has shadowed Christian thought throughout the history of the church; sadly so, considering God is the author of all beauty.”

Tags : Apostle Paul Art Beauty Christianity Creator Creator Of Beauty God Human Body Literature Speech St Augustine Suspicion
Source : Fierce Convictions: The Extraordinary Life of Hannah More—Poet, Reformer, Abolitionist

8. “I am so afraid that strangers with think me good! and there is a degree of hypocrisy in appearing much better than one is.” - Hannah More”

Tags : Appearance Goodness Hannah More Hypocrisy More Than Meets The Eye Persona Reputation
Source : Fierce Convictions: The Extraordinary Life of Hannah More—Poet, Reformer, Abolitionist

9. “It is so easy to practice a creditable degree of so seeming virtue, and so difficult to purify and direct the affections of the heart, that I feel myself in continual danger of appearing better than I am; and I verily believe it is possible to make one’s whole life a display of splendid virtue and agreeable qualities, without ever setting foot towards the narrow path, or even one’s face towards the strait gate.” – Hannah More”

Tags : Authenticity Genuine Faith Hannah More Life Perception Persona Reputation Virtue
Source : Fierce Convictions: The Extraordinary Life of Hannah More—Poet, Reformer, Abolitionist

10. “…the traditional family structure that More supported in her writings enabled women to 'be intelligent, rational, virtuous, and noble creatures, capable of great intellectual and moral achievements. They had the potential for immense influence on their husbands and sons, on their relations, their servants, and the poor.' More held, therefore, … 'the ideal of rational domesticity helped to liberate the individual within a supportive family framework.”

Tags : Family Family Stucture Hannah More Individual Influence Intelligence Men Women
Source : Fierce Convictions: The Extraordinary Life of Hannah More—Poet, Reformer, Abolitionist

11. “When a man of sense comes to marry, it is a companion whom he wants, and not an artist. It is not merely a creature who can paint, and play, and sing, and draw, and dress, and dance; it is a being who can comfort and counsel him; one who can reason and reflect, and feel, and judge, and discourse, and discriminate; one who can assist him in his affairs, lighten his cares, sooth his sorrows, strengthen his principles, and educate his children.” – Hannah More”

Tags : Complementarianism Equal But Different Hannah More Marriage Men Old Fashioned Ideas Women
Source : Fierce Convictions: The Extraordinary Life of Hannah More—Poet, Reformer, Abolitionist

12. “Her shift in thinking was clearly conflicted. It must have been difficult to disavow something for which she had a deep love and in which she had been immersed so much of her life.”

Tags : Change Consistency Conviction Giving Up Hannah More Ideas Thinking
Source : Fierce Convictions: The Extraordinary Life of Hannah More—Poet, Reformer, Abolitionist

13. “A useful education served women best, More thought. To ‘learn how to grow old gracefully is perhaps one of the rarest and most valuable arts which can be taught to a woman.’ Yet, when beauty is all that is expected or desired in a woman, she is left with nothing in its absence. It ‘is a most severe trail for those women to be called to lay down beauty, who have nothing else to take up. It is for this sober season of life that education should lay up its rich resources,’ she argued.”

Tags : Aging Beauty Education Expectations Female Femininity Gender Grace Gracefulness Intelligence Learning Maturity Roles Seasons Society Standards Women
Source : Fierce Convictions: The Extraordinary Life of Hannah More—Poet, Reformer, Abolitionist

14. “The more I see of the ‘hounoured, famed, and great,’ the more I see of the littleness, the unsatisfactoriness of all created good; and that no earthly pleasure can fill up the wants of the immortal principle within.”

Tags : Disappointment Dissatisfaction Fame Immortality Worldy Pleasure
Source : Fierce Convictions: The Extraordinary Life of Hannah More—Poet, Reformer, Abolitionist

15. “Honor, More charged, 'is the religion of tragedy.' Emotions such as love, hate, ambition, pride, and jealousy, 'form a dazzling system of worldly morality,' which contradicts 'the spirit of that religion whose characteristics are charity, meekness, peaceableness, longsuffering, gentleness, forgiveness.”

Tags : Ambition Charity Emotions Honor Longsuffering Meekness Peace Pride Religion Truth
Source : Fierce Convictions: The Extraordinary Life of Hannah More—Poet, Reformer, Abolitionist