Jane Austen Quotes

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1. “Nobody can tell what I suffer! But it is always so. Those who do not complain are never pitied.”

Tags : Complaints Histrionics Hysterics Irony Mrs Bennett Suffering
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride and Prejudice

2. “I hate to hear you talk about all women as if they were fine ladies instead of rational creatures. None of us want to be in calm waters all our lives.”

Tags : Clichés Double Standards Empowerment Equality Feminism Flattery Gender Hypocrisy Independence Men Misogyny Rationality Reason Self Determination Social Norms Stereotypes Strength Women Women S Rights
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Persuasion

3. “There is a stubbornness about me that never can bear to be frightened at the will of others. My courage always rises at every attempt to intimidate me.”

Tags : Courage Dignity Elizabeth Bennet Empowerment Fear Independence Intimidation Self Determination Strength Stubbornness Women
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride and Prejudice

4. “Mary wished to say something very sensible, but knew not how.”

Tags : Foolishness Intelligence Sense Stupidity
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride and Prejudice

5. “What are men to rocks and mountains?”

Tags : Men Mountains Rocks
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride and Prejudice

6. “Let other pens dwell on guilt and misery. I quit such odious subjects as soon as I can, impatient to restore everybody not greatly in fault themselves to tolerable comfort, and to have done with all the rest.”

Tags : Writing Philosophy
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Mansfield Park

7. “If this man had not twelve thousand a year, he would be a very stupid fellow.”

Tags : Stupidity Wealth
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Mansfield Park

8. “The advantages of natural folly in a beautiful girl have been already set forth by the capital pen of a sister author; and to her treatment of the subject I will only add, in justice to men, that though to the larger and more trifling part of the sex, imbecility in females is a great enhancement of their personal charms, there is a portion of them too reasonable and too well informed themselves to desire anything more in woman than ignorance.”

Tags : Charms Clichés Desirability Disdain Education Empowerment Equality Folly Foolishness Girls Ignorance Imbecility Inferiority Men Perception Prejudice Reason Stereotypes Stupidity Women
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Northanger Abbey

9. “The person, be it gentleman or lady, who has not pleasure in a good novel, must be intolerably stupid.”

Tags : Aliteracy Books Classic Humor
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Northanger Abbey

10. “There is nothing I would not do for those who are really my friends. I have no notion of loving people by halves, it is not my nature.”

Tags : Friendship Love
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Northanger Abbey

11. “A lady's imagination is very rapid; it jumps from admiration to love, from love to matrimony in a moment.”

Tags : Humor Love Romantic Women
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride and Prejudice

12. “My idea of good company, Mr. Eliot, is the company of clever, well-informed people who have a great deal of conversation; that is what I call good company.”

Tags : Cleverness Company Conversation Education Good Company Information
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Persuasion

13. “Sometimes one is guided by what they say of themselves, and very frequently by what other people say of them, without giving oneself time to deliberate and judge." -Elinor Dashwood”

Tags : Chapter 17 Elinor Dashwood Sense
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Sense and Sensibility

14. “Elinor agreed to it all, for she did not think he deserved the compliment of rational opposition.”

Tags : Agreement Compliments Discussion Disdain Intelligence Opposition Rationality Reason
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Sense and Sensibility

15. “It is such a happiness when good people get together -- and they always do.”

Tags : Emma Miss Bates Weddings
Author : Jane Austen

16. “Mr. Bennet, how can you abuse your own children in such a way? Youtake delight in vexing me. You have no compassion for my poor nerves.""You mistake me, my dear. I have a high respect for your nerves. Theyare my old friends. I have heard you mention them with considerationthese last twenty years at least.”

Tags : Histrionics Hysteria Irony Nerves Sarcasm
Author : Jane Austen

17. “She was heartily ashamed of her ignorance - a misplaced shame. Where people wish to attach, they should always be ignorant. To come with a well−informed mind is to come with an inability of administering to the vanity of others, which a sensible person would always wish to avoid. A woman especially, if she have the misfortune of knowing anything, should conceal it as well as she can.”

Tags : Attachment Clichés Concealment Empowerment Feminism Ignorance Intelligence Irony Knowledge Preconceptions Prejudice Sarcasm Stereotypes Vanity Women
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Northanger Abbey

18. “I do not want people to be very agreeable, as it saves me the trouble of liking them a great deal.”

Tags : Friends Humor People
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Jane Austen's Letters

19. “I do not think I ever opened a book in my life which had not something to say upon woman's inconstancy. Songs and proverbs, all talk of woman's fickleness. But perhaps you will say, these were all written by men.""Perhaps I shall. Yes, yes, if you please, no reference to examples in books. Men have had every advantage of us in telling their own story. Education has been theirs in so much higher a degree; the pen has been in their hands. I will not allow books to prove anything.”

Tags : Books Clichés Constancy Double Standards Education Feminism Gender Inequality Love Men Misogyny Opportunities Social Norms Stereotypes Women
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Persuasion

20. “I have been used to consider poetry as "the food of love" said Darcy."Of a fine, stout, healthy love it may. Everything nourishes what isstrong already. But if it be only a slight, thin sort of inclination, Iam convinced that one good sonnet will starve it entirely away.”

Tags : Affection Banter Courtship Poetry
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride and Prejudice

21. “Is not general incivility the very essence of love?”

Tags : Banter Love
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride and Prejudice

22. “I declare after all there is no enjoyment like reading! How much sooner one tires of any thing than of a book! -- When I have a house of my own, I shall be miserable if I have not an excellent library.”

Tags : Books Library Reading
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride and Prejudice

23. “Give a girl an education and introduce her properly into the world, and ten to one but she has the means of settling well, without further expense to anybody. ”

Tags : Education Women
Author : Jane Austen

24. “Angry people are not always wise.”

Tags : Anger Jane Austen Wisdom
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride and Prejudice

25. “And now I may dismiss my heroine to the sleepless couch, which is the true heroine's portion - to a pillow strewed with thorns and wet with tears. And lucky may she think herself, if she get another good night's rest in the course of the next three months.”

Tags : Crying Heroine Sleeplessness Tears
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Northanger Abbey

26. “We are all fools in love”

Tags : History Romance Novels
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride and Prejudice

27. “Elizabeth had never been more at a loss to make her feelings appear what they were not. It was necessary to laugh, when she would rather have cried.”

Tags : Concealment Cry Feelings Laugh Pride And Prejudice
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride and Prejudice

28. “You must learn some of my philosophy. Think only of the past as its remembrance gives you pleasure.”

Tags : Elizabeth Bennet Past Pleasure Remembrance
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride and Prejudice

29. “I could easily forgive his pride, if he had not mortified mine.”

Tags : Elizabeth Bennet Forgiveness Injury Mortification Pride
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride and Prejudice

30. “Oh, Lizzy! do anything rather than marry without affection.”

Tags : Affection Duty Feelings Integrity Joy Love Marriage Matrimony Romance Self Determination
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride and Prejudice

31. “There could have been no two hearts so open, no tastes so similar, no feelings so in unison”

Tags : Feelings Hearts Love Waiting
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Persuasion

32. “I cannot fix on the hour, or the spot, or the look or the words, which laid the foundation. It is too long ago. I was in the middle before I knew that I had begun.”

Tags : Love Romance
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride and Prejudice

33. “He was a blessing to all the juvenile part of the neighbourhood, for in summer he was for ever forming parties to eat cold ham and chicken out of doors, and in winter his private balls were numerous enough for any young lady who was not suffering under the insatiable appetite of fifteen.”

Tags : Balls Chicken Ham Private Balls
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Sense and Sensibility

34. “Where the waters do agree, it is quite wonderful the relief they give.”

Tags : Agreement Water
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Emma

35. “It is not time or opportunity that is to determine intimacy;—it is disposition alone. Seven years would be insufficient to make some people acquainted with each other, and seven days are more than enough for others.”

Tags : Disposition Intimacy Marianne Dashwood Openness Opportunity Self Disclosure Time
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Sense and Sensibility

36. “It is not what we think or feel that makes us who we are. It is what we do. Or fail to do...”

Tags : Fail To Do Makes Us Who We Are Think Or Feel What We Do
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Sense and Sensibility

37. “This was a lucky recollection -- it saved her from something like regret.”

Tags : Humor Literary Wit
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride and Prejudice

38. “An unhappy alternative is before you, Elizabeth. From this day you must be a stranger to one of your parents. Your mother will never see you again if you do not marry Mr. Collins, and I will never see you again if you do.”

Tags : Choice Husbands Marriage Parents Proposals
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride and Prejudice

39. “..that sanguine expectation of happiness which is happiness itself”

Tags : Anticipation
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Sense and Sensibility

40. “From all that I can collect by your manner of talking, you must be two of the silliest girls in the country. I have suspected it some time, but I am now convinced.”

Tags :
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride and Prejudice

41. “She wanted to be alone. Her mind was in a state of flutter and wonder, which made it impossible for her to be collected. She was in dancing, singing, exclaiming spirits; and till she had moved about, and talked to herself, and laughed and reflected, she could be fit for nothing rational.”

Tags :
Author : Jane Austen

42. “I am excessively fond of a cottage; there is always so much comfort, so much elegance about them. And I protest, if I had any money to spare, I should buy a little land and build one myself, within a short distance of London, where I might drive myself down at any time, and collect a few friends about me and be happy. I advise everybody who is going to build, to build a cottage.”

Tags :
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Sense and Sensibility

43. “and if a rainy morning deprived them of other enjoyments, they were still resolute in meeting in defiance of wet and dirt, and shut themselves up, to read novels together. Yes, novels; for I will not adopt that ungenerous and impolitic custom so common with novel–writers, of degrading by their contemptuous censure the very performances, to the number of which they are themselves adding — joining with their greatest enemies in bestowing the harshest epithets on such works, and scarcely ever permitting them to be read by their own heroine, who, if she accidentally take up a novel, is sure to turn over its insipid pages with disgust. Alas! If the heroine of one novel be not patronized by the heroine of another, from whom can she expect protection and regard? I cannot approve of it. Let us leave it to the reviewers to abuse such effusions of fancy at their leisure, and over every new novel to talk in threadbare strains of the trash with which the press now groans. Let us not desert one another; we are an injured body. Although our productions have afforded more extensive and unaffected pleasure than those of any other literary corporation in the world, no species of composition has been so much decried. From pride, ignorance, or fashion, our foes are almost as many as our readers. And while the abilities of the nine–hundredth abridger of the History of England, or of the man who collects and publishes in a volume some dozen lines of Milton, Pope, and Prior, with a paper from the Spectator, and a chapter from Sterne, are eulogized by a thousand pens — there seems almost a general wish of decrying the capacity and undervaluing the labour of the novelist, and of slighting the performances which have only genius, wit, and taste to recommend them. “I am no novel–reader — I seldom look into novels — Do not imagine that I often read novels — It is really very well for a novel.” Such is the common cant. “And what are you reading, Miss — ?” “Oh! It is only a novel!” replies the young lady, while she lays down her book with affected indifference, or momentary shame. “It is only Cecilia, or Camilla, or Belinda”; or, in short, only some work in which the greatest powers of the mind are displayed, in which the most thorough knowledge of human nature, the happiest delineation of its varieties, the liveliest effusions of wit and humour, are conveyed to the world in the best–chosen language. Now, had the same young lady been engaged with a volume of the Spectator, instead of such a work, how proudly would she have produced the book, and told its name; though the chances must be against her being occupied by any part of that voluminous publication, of which either the matter or manner would not disgust a young person of taste: the substance of its papers so often consisting in the statement of improbable circumstances, unnatural characters, and topics of conversation which no longer concern anyone living; and their language, too, frequently so coarse as to give no very favourable idea of the age that could endure it.”

Tags : Novels
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Northanger Abbey

44. “....how good Mrs. West could have written such books and collected so many hard works, with all her family cares, is still more a matter of astonishment! Composition seems to me impossible with a head full of joints of mutton and doses of rhubarb.”

Tags :
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Letters of Jane Austen; Selected from the Compilation of Her Great Nephew, Edward, Lord Brabourne

45. “The more I know of the world, the more I am convinced that I shall never see a man whom I can really love. I require so much!”

Tags : Love Requirements
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Sense and Sensibility

46. “In vain have I struggled. It will not do. My feelings will not be repressed. You must allow me to tell you how ardently I admire and love you.”

Tags : Love Mr Darcy
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride And Prejudice

47. “Vanity and pride are different things, though the words are often used synonymously. A person may be proud without being vain. Pride relates more to our opinion of ourselves, vanity to what we would have others think of us.”

Tags : Prejudice Pride Vanity
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride and Prejudice

48. “Full many a flower is born to blush unseen,And waste it's fragrance on the desert air.”

Tags : Anonymity Obscurity Unsung Heros
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Emma

49. “...the pleasantness of an employment does not always evince its propriety.”

Tags : Attitude Behavior Employment Enjoyment Manners Propriety
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Sense and Sensibility

50. “When I look out on such a night as this, I feel as if there could be neither wickedness nor sorrow in the world; and there certainly would be less of both if the sublimity of Nature were more attended to, and people were carried more out of themselves by contemplating such a scene.”

Tags : Contemplation Nature Night Sorrow Sublime Wickedness
Author : Jane Austen

51. “Wickedness is always wickedness, but folly is not always folly.”

Tags : Folly Wickedness
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Emma

52. “You are mistaken, Mr. Darcy, if you suppose that the mode of your declaration affected me in any other way, than as it spared the concern which I might have felt in refusing you, had you behaved in a more gentlemanlike manner." (Elizabeth Bennett)”

Tags : Anger Behaviour Declaration Empowerment Gentlemanlike Gentlemen Humiliation Love Marriage Proposal Men Mr Darcy Pride Proposal Propriety Refusal Rejection Scorn Self Determination Women
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride and Prejudice

53. “No one who had ever seen Catherine Morland in her infancy, would have supposed her born to be a heroine... But from fifteen to seventeen she was in training for a heroine...”

Tags : Heroine
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Northanger Abbey

54. “And such is your definition of matrimony and dancing. Taken in that light, certainly their resemblance is not striking; but I think I could place them in such a view. You will allow that in both man has the advantage of choice, woman only the power of refusal; that in both it is an engagement between man and woman, formed for the advantage of each; and that when once entered into, they belong exclusively to each other till the moment of its dissolution; that it is their duty each to endeavor to give the other no cause for wishing that he or she had bestowed themselves elsewhere, and their best interest to keep their own imaginations from wandering towards the perfections of their neighbors, or fancying that they should have been better off with any one else.”

Tags : Dancing Faithfulness Marriage Matrimony
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Northanger Abbey

55. “There are few people whom I really love, and still fewer of whom I think well.The more I see of the world, the more am I dissatisfied with it; and everyday confirms my belief of the inconsistency of all human characters, and of the little dependence that can be placed on the appearance of either merit or sense.”

Tags : Autonomy Disappointment Perfectionism Realism
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride and Prejudice

56. “It's been many years since I had such an exemplary vegetable.”

Tags : Flattery
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride and Prejudice

57. “A strong sense of duty is no bad part of a woman's portion”

Tags : Women S Strength
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Persuasion

58. “Yes, vanity is a weakness indeed. But pride - where there is a real superiority of mind, pride will be always under good regulation.”

Tags : Humor Mr Darcy Pride
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride and Prejudice

59. “I think I may boast myself to be, with all possible vanity, the most unlearned and uninformed female who ever dared to be an authoress.”

Tags : Austen Women Writers
Author : Jane Austen

60. “A woman of seven and twenty, said Marianne, after pausing a moment, can never hope to feel or inspire affection again.”

Tags : Growing Old Marianne Dashwood
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Sense and Sensibility

61. “But I must object to your dooming Colonel Brandon and his wife to the constant confinement of a sick chamber, merely because he chanced to complain yesterday (a very cold damp day) of a slight rheumatic feel in one of his shoulders." "But he talked of flannel waistcoats," said Marianne; "and with me a flannel waistcoat is invariably connected with the aches, cramps, rheumatisms, and every species of ailment that can afflict the old and the feeble.”

Tags : Elinor Dashwood Growing Old Marianne Dashwood
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Sense and Sensibility

62. “My ideas flow so rapidly that I have not time to express them──by which means my letters sometimes convey no ideas at all to my correspondents.”

Tags : Idea Letter Thinking
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride and Prejudice

63. “...and yet, though desirous to be gone, she could not quit the mansion-house, or look an adieu to the cottage, with its black, dripping and comfortless veranda, or even notice through the misty glasses the last humble tenements of the village, without a saddened heart. Scenes had passed in Uppercross which made it precious. It stood the record of many sensations of pain, once severe, but now softened; and of some instances of relenting feeling, some breathings of friendship and reconciliation, which could never be looked for again, and which could never cease to be dear. She left it all behind her, all but the recollection that such things had been.”

Tags : Farewell Feelings Going Away Memories Parting Recollections Regret
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Persuasion

64. “I am the happiest creature in the world. Perhaps other people have said so before, but not one with such justice. I am happier even than Jane; she only smiles, I laugh.”

Tags : Happiness Laughter Smiles
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride and Prejudice

65. “For what do we live, but to make sport for our neighbors, and laugh at them in our turn?”

Tags : Classics
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride and Prejudice

66. “You may only call me "Mrs. Darcy"... when you are completely, and perfectly, and incandescently happy.”

Tags : Classics Love
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride and Prejudice

67. “What do you know of my heart? What do you know of anything but your own suffering. For weeks, Marianne, I've had this pressing on me without being at liberty to speak of it to a single creature. It was forced on me by the very person whose prior claims ruined all my hope. I have endured her exultations again and again whilst knowing myself to be divided from Edward forever. Believe me, Marianne, had I not been bound to silence I could have provided proof enough of a broken heart, even for you.”

Tags : Classics Heartbreak Stoicism
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Sense and Sensibility

68. “They had no conversation together, no intercourse but what the commonest civility required. Once so much to each other! Now nothing! There had been a time, when of all the large party now filling the drawing-room at Uppercross, they would have found it most difficult to cease to speak to one another. With the exception, perhaps, of Admiral and Mrs. Croft, who seemed particularly attached and happy, (Anne could allow no other exception even among the married couples) there could have been no two hearts so open, no tastes so simliar, no feelings so in unison, no countenances so beloved. Now they were as strangers; nay, worse than strangers, for they could never become aquainted. It was a perpetual estrangement.”

Tags : Classics Literature Romance
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Persuasion

69. “Think only of the past as its remembrance gives you pleasure.”

Tags : Classics
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride and Prejudice

70. “It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife. However little known the feelings or views of such a man may be on his first entering a neighbourhood, this truth is so well fixed in the minds of the surrounding families, that he is considered as the rightful property of someone or other of their daughters.”

Tags : Bachelorhood Classics Marriage Men Possessiveness Single Men Wives Women
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride and Prejudice

71. “Her pleasure in the walk must arise from the exercise and the day, from the view of the last smiles of the year upon the tawny leaves and withered hedges, and from repeating to herself some few of the thousand poetical descriptions extant of autumn--that season of peculiar and inexhaustible influence on the mind of taste and tenderness--that season which has drawn from every poet worthy of being read some attempt at description, or some lines of feeling.”

Tags : Autumn Fall Nature Pleasure Poets Seasons Walking
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Persuasion

72. “To avoid a comparative poverty, which her affection and her society would have deprived of all its horrors, I have, by raising myself to affluence, lost everything that could make it a blessing.”

Tags : Consequence Guilty Regret Relationships Vanity
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Sense and Sensibility

73. “It is only a novel... or, in short, only some work in which the greatest powers of the mind are displayed, in which the most thorough knowledge of human nature, the happiest delineation of its varieties, the liveliest effusions of wit and humour, are conveyed to the world in the best-chosen language”

Tags : Books Novels Reading
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Northanger Abbey

74. “You pierce my soul. I am half agony, half hope...I have loved none but you.”

Tags : Romantic
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Persuasion

75. “And from the whole she deduced this useful lesson, that to go previously engaged to a ball, does not necessarily increase either the dignity or enjoyment of a young lady.”

Tags : Austen Dances Jane Prom Timeless
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Northanger Abbey

76. “Every savage can dance.”

Tags : Dancing
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride and Prejudice

77. “Woe betide him, and her too, when it comes to things of consequence, when they are placed in circumstances requiring fortitude and strength of mind, if she have not resolution enough to resist idle interference ... It is the worst evil of too yielding and indecisive a character, that no influence over it can be depended on. You are never sure of a good impression being durable; everybody may sway it. Let those who would be happy be firm.”

Tags : Empowerment Independence Interference Judgment Persuasion Self Determination Strength Weakness
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Persuasion

78. “To yield readily--easily--to the persuasion of a friend is no merit.... To yield without conviction is no compliment to the understanding of either.”

Tags : Conviction Persuasion Yield
Author : Jane Austen

79. “I will be calm. I will be mistress of myself.”

Tags : Self Control Serenity
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Sense and Sensibility

80. “We have all a better guide in ourselves, if we would attend to it, than any other person can be.”

Tags : Guidance Self Knowledge Self Trust
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Mansfield Park

81. “He is a gentleman, and I am a gentleman's daughter. So far we are equal.”

Tags : Feminism
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride and Prejudice

82. “Business, you know, may bring money, but friendship hardly ever does.”

Tags : Business Friendship Jane Austen Money
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Emma

83. “To look almost pretty is an acquisition of higher delight to a girl who has been looking plain the first fifteen years of her life than a beauty from her cradle can ever receive.”

Tags : Adolescence Beauty Girls Prettiness
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Northanger Abbey

84. “Had I been in love, I could not have been more wretchedly blind. But vanity, not love, has been my folly.”

Tags : Affection Blindness Denial Folly Love Refusal Romance Vanity
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride and Prejudice

85. “I cannot speak well enough to be unintelligible.”

Tags : Convoluted Speech Expression Humor Intelligibility Sarcasm
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Northanger Abbey

86. “It would be mortifying to the feelings of many ladies, could they be made to understand how little the heart of a man is affected by what is costly or new in their attire... Woman is fine for her own satisfaction alone. No man will admire her the more, no woman will like her the better for it. Neatness and fashion are enough for the former, and a something of shabbiness or impropriety will be most endearing to the latter.”

Tags : Fashion Friendship Romance
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Northanger Abbey

87. “Every young lady may feel for my heroine in this critical moment, for every young lady has at some time or other known the same agitation. All have been, or at least all have believed themselves to be, in danger from the pursuit of some one they wished to avoid; and all have been anxious for the attentions of someone they wished to please.”

Tags : Austen Classics Love Page 50 Suitors Young Ladies
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Northanger Abbey

88. “Till this moment I never knew myself.”

Tags : Profound
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride and Prejudice

89. “She hoped to be wise and reasonable in time; but alas! Alas! She must confess to herself that she was not wise yet.”

Tags : Aspiration Self Awareness Self Improvement
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Persuasion

90. “Miss Bingley's congratulations to her brother, on his approaching marriage, were all that was affectionate and insincere.”

Tags : Congratulations Insincerity Marriage
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride and Prejudice

91. “You deserve a longer letter than this; but it is my unhappy fate seldom to treat people so well as they deserve.”

Tags : Austen Fate Letters
Author : Jane Austen

92. “Seldom, very seldom, does complete truth belong to any human disclosure; seldom can it happen that something is not a little disguised or a little mistaken.”

Tags : Deception Honesty Relationships Truth
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Emma

93. “It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.”

Tags : Husband Marriage Opening Lines Wife
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride and Prejudice

94. “We all know him to be a proud, unpleasant sort of man; but this would be nothing if you really liked him.”

Tags : Affection Romance
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride and Prejudice

95. “General benevolence, but not general friendship, make a man what he ought to be.”

Tags : Human Behavior
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Emma

96. “I have faults enough, but they are not, I hope, of understanding. My temper I dare not vouch for. It is, I believe, too little yielding— certainly too little for the convenience of the world. I cannot forget the follies and vices of other so soon as I ought, nor their offenses against myself. My feelings are not puffed about with every attempt to move them. My temper would perhaps be called resentful. My good opinion once lost, is lost forever.”

Tags : Character Flaws Mr Darcy Pride And Prejudice Temper
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride and Prejudice

97. “There is, I believe, in every disposition a tendency to some particular evil, a natural defect, which not even the best education can overcome.""And your defect is a propensity to hate everybody.""And yours," he replied with a smile, "is wilfully to misunderstand them.”

Tags : Character Defects Dislike Education Hatred Misunderstanding Propensity Repartee Retort Wit
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride and Prejudice

98. “Then, with the gladness which must be felt, nay, which he did not scruple to feel, having never believed Frank Churchill to be at all deserving Emma, was there so much fond solicitude, so much keen anxiety for her, that he could stay no longer. He had ridden home through the rain; and had walked up directly after dinner, to see how this sweetest and best of all creatures, faultless in spite of all her faults, bore the discovery.”

Tags : Churchill Emma Grateful Knightley
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Emma

99. “It was told to me, it was in a manner forced on me by the very person herself whose prior engagement ruined all my prospects, and told me, as I thought, with triumph. This person's suspicions, therefore, I have had to oppose by endeavouring to appear indifferent where I have been most deeply interested; and it has not been only once; I have had her hopes and exultations to listen to again and again. I have known myself to be divided from Edward forever, without hearing one circumstance that could make me less desire the connection. Nothing has proved him unworthy; nor has anything declared him indifferent to me. I have had to content against the unkindness of his sister and the insolence of his mother, and have suffered the punishment of an attachment without enjoying its advantages. And all this has been going on at the time when, as you too well know, it has not been my only unhappiness. If you can think me capable of ever feeling, surely you may suppose that I have suffered now.”

Tags : Attachment Engagement Love Relationships Suffering
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Sense and Sensibility

100. “Where people are really attached, poverty itself is wealth.”

Tags : Attachment Poverty Wealth
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Northanger Abbey

101. “To wish was to hope, and to hope was to expect”

Tags : Expect Expectations Hope Love Wish
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Sense and Sensibility

102. “There is a stubbornness about me that never can bear to be frightened at the will of others.”

Tags : Jane Austen Mgg Pride And Prejudice Stubbornness
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride and Prejudice

103. “There are few people whom I really love, and still fewer of whom I think well. The more I see of the world, the more am I dissatisfied with it; and every day confirms my belief of the inconsistency of all human characters, and of the little dependence that can be placed on the appearance of merit or sense.”

Tags : Elizabeth Bennet Jane Austen
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride and Prejudice

104. “I am excessively diverted. ”

Tags : Elizabeth Bennet
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride and Prejudice

105. “Follies and nonsense, whims and inconsistencies do divert me, I own, and I laugh at them whenever I can.”

Tags : Elizabeth Bennet
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride and Prejudice

106. “She was convinced that she could have been happy with him, when it was no longer likely they should meet.”

Tags : Elizabeth Bennet Mr Darcy Pride And Prejudice
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride and Prejudice

107. “She began now to comprehend that he was exactly the man who, in disposition and talents, would most suit her. His understanding and temper, though unlike her own, would have answered all her wishes. It was an union that must have been to the advantage of both: by her ease and liveliness, his mind might have been softened, his manners improved; and from his judgement, information, and knowledge of the world, she must have received benefit of greater importance.”

Tags : Advantage Of Both Darcy Elizabeth Bennet Love Union
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride and Prejudice

108. “They parted at last with mutual civility, and possibly a mutual desire of never meeting again.”

Tags : Elizabeth Bennet Mr Darcy Parting Pride And Prejudice
Author : Jane Austen

109. “Vanity, not love, has been my folly.”

Tags : Austen Bennet Elizabeth Bennet Jane
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride and Prejudice

110. “My object then," replied Darcy, "was to show you, by every civility in my power, that I was not so mean as to resent the past; and I hoped to obtain your forgiveness, to lessen your ill opinion, by letting you see that your reproofs had been attended to. How soon any other wishes introduced themselves I can hardly tell, but I believe in about half an hour after I had seen you.”

Tags : Darcy Elizabeth Bennet Jane Austen Mr Darcy Pride And Prejudice
Author : Jane Austen

111. “It's a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.”

Tags : Elizabeth Bennet Mr Darcy Orgoglio E Pregiudizio Zia Jane
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride and Prejudice

112. “You may ask questions which I shall not choose to answer.”

Tags : Elizabeth Bennet Jane Austen Pride And Prejudice
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride and Prejudice

113. “It was gratitude; gratitude, not merely for having once loved her, but for loving her still well enough to forgive all the petulance and acrimony of her manner in rejecting him, and all the unjust accusations accompanying her rejection.”

Tags : Elizabeth Bennet Gratitude Love Mr Darcy
Author : Jane Austen

114. “Elizabeth was excessively disappointed...but it was her business to be satisfied — and certainly her temper to be happy; and all was soon right again.”

Tags : Elizabeth Bennet
Author : Jane Austen

115. “It was gratitude; gratitude, not merelyfor having once loved her, but for loving her still well enough to forgive all the petulance and acrimony of her manner in rejecting him.”

Tags : Elizabeth Bennet Gratitude Jane Austen Love Mr Darcy
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride and Prejudice

116. “São muito poucas pessoas que eu realmente amo, e ainda menos as que tenho em alta conta. Quanto mais conheço o mundo, mais insatisfeita fico com ele; todo dia confirma minha crença da inconsistência de todo caráter humano, e na pouca confiança que se pode ter na aparência tanto do mérito quanto da razão.”

Tags : Elizabeth Bennet
Author : Jane Austen

117. “Aunque me dieras cuarenta hombres como él, nunca sería tan feliz como tú. Mientras no posea tu buen carácter, tu bondad, no podrá embargarme esa dicha. No, no, déjame a mi aire; y, tal vez, si me acompaña la suerte, con el tiempo pueda encontrar a otro señor Collins.”

Tags : Elizabeth Bennet Español Jane Austen Mr Collins Orgullo Y Prejuicio Señor Collins
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride and Prejudice

118. “One has got all the goodness, and the other all the appearance of it”

Tags : Elizabeth Bennet Fitzwilliam Darcy Jane Austen Mr Darcy
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride and Prejudice

119. “My dear, dear aunt,' she rapturously cried, what delight! what felicity! You give me fresh life and vigour. Adieu to disappointment and spleen. What are men to rocks and mountains? Oh! what hours of transport we shall spend! And when we do return, it shall not be like other travellers, without being able to give one accurate idea of any thing. We will know where we have gone -- we will recollect what we have seen. Lakes, mountains, and rivers shall not be jumbled together in our imaginations; nor, when we attempt to describe any particular scene, will we begin quarrelling about its relative situation. Let our first effusions be less insupportable than those of the generality of travellers.”

Tags : Elizabeth Bennet Jane Austen Nature Pride And Prejudice
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride and Prejudice

120. “Every body has their taste in noises as well as other matters; and sounds are quite innoxious, or most distressing, by their sort rather than their quantity.”

Tags : Human Noise
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Persuasion

121. “Adieu to disappointment and spleen. What are men to rocks and mountains?”

Tags : Men Mountains Prejudice Pride Rocks
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride and Prejudice

122. “Her family had of late been exceedingly fluctuating. For many years of her life she had had two sons; but the crime and annihilation of Edward a few weeks ago, had robbed her of one; the similar annihilation of Robert had left her for a fortnight without any; and now, by the resurrection of Edward, she had one again.”

Tags : Family Humor Jane Austen Sense And Sensibility Sons
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Sense and Sensibility

123. “I assure you. I have no notion of treating men with such respect. That is the way to spoil them.”

Tags : Men
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Northanger Abbey

124. “And pictures of perfection, as you know, make me sick and wicked.”

Tags : Amusement Commentary Humor Snark
Author : Jane Austen

125. “[I]f a book is well written, I always find it too short.”

Tags : Books Craft Enjoyment Entertainment Writing
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Catharine and Other Writings

126. “It was a delightful visit;-perfect, in being much too short.”

Tags : Visits
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Emma

127. “Know your own happiness. You want nothing but patience- or give it a more fascinating name, call it hope.”

Tags : Follow Your Bliss Self Actualization
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Sense and Sensibility

128. “Occupied in observing Mr. Bingley’s attentions to her sister, Elizabeth was far from suspecting that she was herself becoming an object of some interest in the eyes of his friend. Mr. Darcy had at first scarcely allowed her to be pretty: he had looked at her without admiration at the ball; and when they next met, he looked at her only to criticise. But no sooner had he made it clear to himself and his friends that she had hardly a good feature in her face, than he began to find it was rendered uncommonly intelligent by the beautiful expression of her dark eyes. To this discovery succeeded some others equally mortifying. Though he had detected with a critical eye more than one failure of perfect symmetry in her form, he was forced to acknowledge her figure to be light and pleasing; and in spite of his asserting that her manners were not those of the fashionable world, he was caught by their easy playfulness. Of this she was perfectly unaware: to her he was only the man who made himself agreeable nowhere, and who had not thought her handsome enough to dance with.”

Tags : Attraction
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride and Prejudice

129. “But I will not repine. It cannot last long. He will be forgot, and we shall all be as we were before.”

Tags : Heartache Heartbreak Resilience
Author : Jane Austen

130. “Life could do nothing for her, beyond giving time for a better preparation for death.”

Tags : Hopelessness
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Sense and Sensibility

131. “When shall I cease to regret you! – When learn to feel a home elsewhere! – Oh! Happy house, could you know what I suffer in now viewing you from this spot, from whence perhaps I may view you no more! – And you, ye well-known trees! – but you will continue the same. – No leaf will decay because we are removed, nor any branch become motionless although we can observe you no longer! – No; you will continue the same; unconscious of the pleasure or the regret you occasion, and insensible of any change in those who walk under your shade! – But who will remain to enjoy you?”

Tags : Grief And Loss Nostalgia
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Sense and Sensibility

132. “Do not give way to useless alarm; though it is right to be prepared for the worst, there is no occasion to look on it as certain.”

Tags : Comfort Inspirational Jane Austen Pride And Prejudice
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride and Prejudice

133. “Why not seize the pleasure at once? -- How often is happiness destroyed by preparation, foolish preparation!”

Tags : Happiness Pleasures Preparation Spontaneity
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Emma

134. “At first sight, his address is certainly not striking; and his person can hardly be called handsome, till the expression of his eyes, which are uncommonly good, and the general sweetness of his countenance, is perceived.”

Tags : Attractiveness Charm First Impressions
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Sense and Sensibility

135. “Nobody, who has not been in the interior of a family, can say what the difficulties of any individual of that family may be.”

Tags : Family Individual Outsider
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Emma

136. “I suspect that in this comprehensive and (may I say) commonplace censure, you are not judging from yourself, but from prejudiced persons, whose opinions you have been in the habit of hearing. It is impossible that your own observation can have given you much knowledge of the clergy. You can have been personally acquainted with very few of a set of men you condemn so conclusively.”

Tags : Judgment Judgmental Opinion Prejudice Stereotypes
Author : Jane Austen

137. “I come here with no expectations, only to profess, now that I am at liberty to do so, that my heart is and always will be...yours.”

Tags : Devotion Love Pronouncements Of Love
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Sense and Sensibility

138. “She mediated, by turns, on broken promises and broken arches, phaetons and false hangings, Tilneys and trap-doors.”

Tags : Gothic
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Northanger Abbey

139. “I frequently observe that one pretty face would be followed by five and thirty frights.”

Tags : Funny Girls Humor Mean Ugly
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Persuasion

140. “And this," cried Darcy, as he walked with quick steps across the room, "is your opinion of me! This is the estimation in which you hold me! I thank you for explaining it so fully.”

Tags : Misconceptions Reality Check Unrequited Love
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride and Prejudice

141. “But Catherine did not know her own advantages - did not know that a good-looking girl, with an affectionate heart and a very ignorant mind, cannot fail of attracting a clever young man, unless circumstances are particularly untoward.”

Tags : Attraction Heart Ignorance
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Northanger Abbey

142. “Always resignation and acceptance. Always prudence and honour and duty. Elinor, where is your heart?”

Tags : Stoicism
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Sense and Sensibility

143. “...when pain is over, the remembrance of it often becomes a pleasure.”

Tags : Life Memory Pain Pleasure
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Persuasion

144. “We do not suffer by accident.”

Tags : Accident Suffering
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride and Prejudice

145. “Common sense, common care, common prudence, were all sunk in Mrs. Dashwood's romantic delicacy.”

Tags : Common Sense Romantics
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Sense and Sensibility

146. “Her tears fell abundantly--but her grief was so truly artless, that no dignity could have made it more respectable in Emma's eyes--and she listened to her and tried to console her with all her heart and understanding--really for the time convinced that Harriet was the superior creature of the two--and that to resemble her would be more for her own welfare and happiness than all that genius or intelligence could do.It was rather too late in the day to set about being simple-minded and ignorant; but she left her with every previous resolution confirmed of being humble and discreet, and repressing imagination all the rest of her life.”

Tags : Acceptance Drama Queen Emotion Smart Stupidity
Author : Jane Austen

147. “If I had ever learnt, I should have been a great proficient.”

Tags : Boasting Conceit Ironic
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride and Prejudice

148. “I am no novel-reader -- I seldom look into novels -- Do not imagine that I often read novels -- It is really very well for a novel." Such is the common cant. "And what are you reading, Miss -- ?" "Oh! It is only a novel!" replies the young lady, while she lays down her book with affected indifference, or momentary shame. "It is only Cecilia, or Camilla, or Belinda"; or, in short, only some work in which the greatest powers of the mind are displayed, in which the most thorough knowledge of human nature, the happiest delineation of its varieties, the liveliest effusions of wit and humour, are conveyed to the world in the best-chosen language.”

Tags : Books Reading Snobbery Words
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Northanger Abbey

149. “Catherine had never wanted comfort more, and [Henry] looked as if he was aware of it.”

Tags : Comfort Concern
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Northanger Abbey

150. “Nothing is more deceitful," said Darcy, "than the appearance of humility. It is often only carelessness of opinion, and sometimes an indirect boast.”

Tags : Appearance Deceit Humility
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride and Prejudice

151. “It was a remainder of former sentiment; it was an impulse of pure, though unacknowledged friendship; it was a proof of his own warm and amiable heart, which she could not contemplate without emotions so compounded of pleasure and pain, that she knew not which prevailed.”

Tags : Sentiment
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Persuasion

152. “It does not come to me in quite so direct a line as that; it takes a bend or two, but nothing of consequence. The stream is as good as at first; the little rubbish it collects in the turnings is easily moved away.”

Tags : Gossip Hearsay Rubbish Truth
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Persuasion

153. “…for what after all is Youth and Beauty?”

Tags : Beauty Youth
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Catharine and Other Writings

154. “My idea of good company...is the company of clever, well-informed people, who have a great deal of conversation; that is what I call good company.' 'You are mistaken,' said he gently, 'that is not good company, that is the best.”

Tags : Anne Eliot Good Company Jane Austen Persuasion
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Persuasion

155. “You pierce my soul. I am half agony, half hope. Tell me not that I am too late, that such precious feelings are gone for ever. I offer myself to you again with a heart even more your own than when you almost broke it, eight and a half years ago. Dare not say that a man forgets sooner than woman, that his love has an earlier death. I have loved none but you. Unjust I may have been, weak and resentful I have been, but never inconstant.”

Tags : Jane Austen Persuasion
Author : Jane Austen

156. “One does not love a place the less for having suffered in it, unless it has been all suffering, nothing but suffering. ”

Tags : Anne Elliot Jane Austen Persuasion
Author : Jane Austen

157. “What! Would I be turned back from doing a thing that I had determined to do, and that I knew to be right, by the airs and interference of such a person, or any person I may say? No, I have no idea of being so easily persuaded. When I have made up my mind, I have made it.”

Tags : Determination Empowerment Independence Interference Judgment Persuasion Self Determination Strength Weakness
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Persuasion

158. “Captain Harvile: Poor Phoebe, she would not have forgotten him so soon. It was not in her nature. Anne Elliot: It would not be in the nature of any woman who truly loved. Captain Harvile: Do you claim that for your sex? Anne Elliot: We do not forget you as soon as you forget us. We cannot help ourselves. We live at home, quiet, confined, and our feelings prey upon us. You always have business of some sort or other to take you back into the world. Captain Harvile: I won't allow it to be any more man's nature than women's to be inconstant or to forget those they love or have loved. I believe the reverse. I believe... Let me just observe that all histories are against you, all stories, prose, and verse. I do not think I ever opened a book in my life which did not have something to say on women's fickleness. Anne Elliot: But they were all written by men. ”

Tags : Jane Austen Persuasion Screenplay
Author : Jane Austen

159. “It would be most right, and most wise, and, therefore must involve least suffering.”

Tags : Austen Jane Persuasion Right Suffering Wise
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Persuasion

160. “Such a letter was not to be soon recovered from. . . . Every moment rather brought fresh agitation. It was an overpowering happiness.”

Tags : Anne Elliot Persuasion
Author : Jane Austen

161. “There is something so amiable in the prejudices of a young mind, that one is sorry to see them give way to the reception of more general opinions.”

Tags : Youthful Optimism
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Sense and Sensibility

162. “I leave it to be settled, by whomsoever it may concern, whether the tendency of this work be altogether to recommend parental tyranny, or reward filial disobedience.”

Tags : Humorous Inside Jokes
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Northanger Abbey

163. “His departure gave Catherine the first experimental conviction that a loss may be sometimes a gain.”

Tags : Gain Loss
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Northanger Abbey

164. “There is, I believe, in every disposition a tendency to some particular evil - a natural defect, which not even the best education can overcome.”

Tags : Accurate Insightful
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride and Prejudice

165. “I certainly have not the talent which some people possess," said Darcy, "of conversing easily with those I have never seen before. I cannot catch their tone of conversation, or appear interested in their concerns, as I often see done.”

Tags : Conversations Sociability Social Anxiety
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride and Prejudice

166. “They were within twenty yards of each other, and so abrupt was his appearance, that it was impossible to avoid his sight. Their eyes instantly met, and the cheeks of each were overspread with the deepest blush. He absolutely started, and for a moment seemed immoveable from surprise; but shortly recovering himself, advanced towards the party, and spoke to Elizabeth, if not in terms of perfect composure, at least of perfect civility.”

Tags : Blush Love Romance
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride and Prejudice

167. “We never shall. We never can expect to prove anything upon such point. It is a difference of opinion which does not admit of proof. We each begin , probably, with a little bias toward our own sex; and upon that bias build every circumstance in favor of it which has occurred within our own circle; so many of which circumstances (perhaps those very cases which strike us the most) may be precisely such as cannot be brought forward without betraying a confidence, or in some respect, saying what should bot be said.”

Tags : Opinions
Author : Jane Austen

168. “I have no right to give my opinion," said Wickham, "as to his being agreeable or otherwise. I am not qualified to form one. I have known him too long and too well to be a fair judge. It is impossible for me to be impartial.”

Tags : Opinions
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride and Prejudice

169. “If my opinions are wrong, I must correct them—if they are above my station, I must endeavour to conceal them.”

Tags : Opinions
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Lady Susan, The Watsons, Sanditon

170. “Facts or opinions which are to pass through the hands of so many, to be misconceived by folly in one, and ignorance in another, can hardly have much truth left.”

Tags : Ignorance Knowledge
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Persuasion

171. “But to live in ignorance on such a point was impossible.”

Tags : Ignorance Truth
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride and Prejudice

172. “people always live for ever when there is an annuity to be paid them”

Tags : Social Security
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Sense and Sensibility

173. “Sitting with her on Sunday evening — a wet Sunday evening — the very time of all others when if a friend is at hand the heart must be opened, and every thing told…”

Tags : Sunday
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Mansfield Park

174. “She was sensible and clever, but eager in everything; her sorrows, her joys, could have no moderation.”

Tags : Sensibility Women
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Sense and Sensibility: The Screenplay

175. “She was nothing more than a mere good-tempered, civil and obliging Young Woman; as such we could scarcely dislike her -- she was only an Object of Contempt”

Tags : Classics Humour Sensibility
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Love and Freindship and Other Early Works

176. “the rent here may be low but i believe we have it on very hard terms --sense & sensibility”

Tags : Humility Rent Sense Sensibility
Author : Jane Austen

177. “...and to aim at the restraint of sentiments which were not in themselves illaudable, appeared to her not merely an unnecessary effort, but a disgraceful subjection of reason to common-place and mistaken notions.”

Tags : Sense Sensibility
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Sense and Sensibility

178. “I never wish to offend, but I am so foolishly shy, that I often seem negligent, when I am only kept back by my natural awkwardness."-Edward Ferrars”

Tags : Chapter 17 Edward Ferrars Shyness
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Sense and Sensibility

179. “Esteem him! Like him! Cold-hearted Elinor! Oh! worse than cold-hearted! Ashamed of being otherwise. Use those words again, and I will leave the room this moment.”

Tags : Elinor Dashwood Literature Love Marianne Dashwood Quote Sense Sensibility
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Sense and Sensibility

180. “No podría ser feliz con un hombre cuyo gusto no coincidiera en todo momento con el mío. Tendría que participar en todos mis sentimientos. Los mismos libros, la misma música habría de hechizarnos a los dos.”

Tags : Elinor Dashwood Love Novel
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Sense and Sensibility

181. “I should think he must be rather a dressy man for his time of life. Such a number of looking-glasses! Oh Lord! There is not getting away from one's self”

Tags : Humor Mirrors
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Persuasion

182. “Where people wish to attach, they should always be ignorant. To come with a well−informed mind is to come with an inability of administering to the vanity of others, which a sensible person would always wish to avoid.”

Tags : Mind Old Fashioned Superficial Vanity
Author : Jane Austen

183. “There is no disputing about taste.”

Tags : Tastes
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Emma

184. “[...] for it was many days since she had any appetite, and many nights since she had really slept; and now, when her mind was no longer supported by the fever of suspense, the consequence of all this was felt in an aching head, a weakened stomach, and general nervous faintness. A glass of wine, which Elinor procured for her directly, made her more comfortable [...].”

Tags : Problemsolving Sense Sensibility Wine
Author : Jane Austen

185. “Upon my word, Emma, to hear you abusing the reason you have, is almost enough to make me think so too. Better be without sense than misapply it as you do.”

Tags : Reason Sense
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Emma

186. “Every impulse of feeling should be guided by reason; and, in my opinion, exertion should always be in proportion to what is required.”

Tags : Exertion Feeling Impulse Reason Truth
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Pride and Prejudice

187. “But you must give my compliments to him. Yes — I think it must be compliments. Is not there a something wanted, Miss Price, in our language — a something between compliments and — and love — to suit the sort of friendly acquaintance we have had together? — So many months acquaintance! — But compliments may be sufficient here.”

Tags : Compliments Love
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Mansfield Park

188. “Every thing was to take its natural course, however, neither impelled nor assisted.”

Tags : Inertia
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Emma

189. “Ah! There is nothing like staying at home, for real comfort.”

Tags : Relaxation
Author : Jane Austen

190. “My dearest Emma," said he, "for dearest you will always be, whatever the event of this hour's conversation, my dearest, most beloved Emma -- tell me at once. Say 'No,' if it is to be said." She could really say nothing. "You are silent," he cried, with great animation; "absolutely silent! at present I ask no more."Emma was almost ready to sink under the agitation of this moment. The dread of being awakened from the happiest dream, was perhaps the most prominent feeling."I cannot make speeches, Emma," he soon resumed; and in a tone of such sincere, decided, intelligible tenderness as was tolerably convincing. "If I loved you less, I might be able to talk about it more. But you know what I am. You hear nothing but truth from me. I have blamed you, and lectured you, and you have borne it as no other woman in England would have borne it. Bear with the truths I would tell you now, dearest Emma, as well as you have borne with them. The manner, perhaps, may have as little to recommend them. God knows, I have been a very indifferent lover. But you understand me. Yes, you see, you understand my feelings and will return them if you can. At present, I ask only to hear, once to hear your voice.”

Tags : Love
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Emma

191. “I am now convinced that I have never been much in love; for had I really experienced that pure and elevating passion, I should at present detest his very name, and wish him all manner of evil. But my feelings are not only cordial towards him; they are even impartial towards her. I cannot find out that I hate her at all, or that I am in the least unwilling to think her a very good sort of girl. There can be no love in all this.”

Tags : Loss Love
Author : Jane Austen

192. “Run mad as often as you choose, but do not faint!”

Tags : Advice For Daily Living
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Love and Friendship

193. “Dear Diary, Today I tried not to think about Mr. Knightly. I tried not to think about him when I discussed the menu with Cook... I tried not to think about him in the garden where I thrice plucked the petals off a daisy to acertain his feelings for Harriet. I don't think we should keep daisies in the garden, they really are a drab little flower. And I tried not to think about him when I went to bed, but something had to be done.”

Tags : Emma Not From The Book
Author : Jane Austen

194. “I lay it down as a general rule, Harriet, that if a woman doubts as to whether she should accept a man or not, she certainly ought to refuse him.”

Tags : Emma Jane Austen
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Emma

195. “There is one thing, Emma, which a man can always do if he chooses, and that is his duty; not by manoeuvring and finessing, but by vigour and resolution. - Mr. Knightley”

Tags : Classic Literature Duty Emma Jane Austen Mr Knightley Philosophy Wisdom In Fiction
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Emma

196. “Whom are you going to dance with?' asked Mr. Knightley.She hesitated a moment and then replied, 'With you, if you will ask me.'Will you?' said he, offering his hand.Indeed I will. You have shown that you can dance, and you know we are not really so much brother and sister as to make it at all improper.'Brother and sister! no, indeed.”

Tags : Emma Jane Austen Mr Knightley
Author : Jane Austen

197. “Human nature is so well disposed towards those who are in interesting situations, that a young person, who either marries or dies, is sure of being kindly spoken of.”

Tags : Ah Emma
Author : Jane Austen

198. “It has sunk him, I cannot say how much it has sunk him in my opinion. So unlike what a man should be!-None of that upright integrity, that strict adherence to truth and principle, that distain of trick and littleness, which a man should display in every transaction of his life.”

Tags : Character Emma Integrity Jane Austen Man Trick Truth
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Emma

199. “I don't approve of surprises. The pleasure is never enhanced and the inconvenience is considerable.”

Tags : Emma Jane Austen Mr Knightley
Author : Jane Austen
Source : Emma

200. “It is always incomprehensible to a man that a woman should ever refuse an offer of marriage. A man always imagines a woman to be ready for any body who asks her.”

Tags : Emma
Author : Jane Austen