Fyodor Dostoyevsky Quotes

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1. “What is hell? I maintain that it is the suffering of being unable to love.”

Tags : Hell Love Suffering
Source : The Brothers Karamazov

2. “Pain and suffering are always inevitable for a large intelligence and a deep heart.”

Tags : 265 Raskolnikov Suffering
Source : Crime and Punishment

3. “The more stupid one is, the closer one is to reality. The more stupid one is, the clearer one is. Stupidity is brief and artless, while intelligence squirms and hides itself. Intelligence is unprincipled, but stupidity is honest and straightforward.”

Tags : Intelligence Stupidity
Source : The Brothers Karamazov

4. “You see I kept asking myself then: why am I so stupid that if others are stupid—and I know they are—yet I won't be wiser?”

Tags : Life Stupidity
Source : Crime and Punishment

5. “Gentlemen, let us suppose that man is not stupid. (Indeed one cannot refuse to suppose that, if only from the one consideration, that, if man is stupid, then who is wise?) But if he is not stupid, he is monstrously ungrateful! Phenomenally ungrateful. In fact, I believe that the best definition of man is the ungrateful biped.”

Tags : Human Nature Man Stupidity
Source : Notes from Underground, White Nights, The Dream of a Ridiculous Man, and Selections from The House of the Dead

6. “Above all, don't lie to yourself. The man who lies to himself and listens to his own lie comes to a point that he cannot distinguish the truth within him, or around him, and so loses all respect for himself and for others. And having no respect he ceases to love.”

Tags : Lies Love Respect Self Deception Truth
Source : The Brothers Karamazov

7. “Pain and suffering are always inevitable for a large intelligence and a deep heart. The really great men must, I think, have great sadness on earth.”

Tags :
Source : Crime and Punishment

8. “To go wrong in one's own way is better than to go right in someone else's.”

Tags : Independent Thought Self Determination Self Expression
Source : Crime and Punishment

9. “For, having begun to build their Tower of Babel without us, they will end in anthropophagy. And it is then that the beast will come crawling to us and lick our feet and spatter them with tears of blood from its eyes. And we shall sit upon the beast and raise the cup, and on it will be written: "Mystery!”

Tags : Grand Inquisitor Morality Without Religion Mystery Science
Source : The Brothers Karamazov

10. “People speak sometimes about the "bestial" cruelty of man, but that is terribly unjust and offensive to beasts, no animal could ever be so cruel as a man, so artfully, so artistically cruel.”

Tags : Animals Cruelty Mankind

11. “I am a fool with a heart but no brains, and you are a fool with brains but no heart; and we’re both unhappy, and we both suffer.”

Tags : Fool Fyodor Dostoevsky Heart
Source : The Idiot

12. “It takes something more than intelligence to act intelligently.”

Tags : Intelligence Intelligent Action
Source : Crime and Punishment

13. “A fool with a heart and no sense is just as unhappy as a fool with sense and no heart.”

Tags : Fools Heart Sense
Source : The Idiot

14. “I say let the world go to hell, but I should always have my tea.”

Tags : Hell Individualism Irony Selfishness Tea
Source : Notes from Underground

15. “The world says: "You have needs -- satisfy them. You have as much right as the rich and the mighty. Don't hesitate to satisfy your needs; indeed, expand your needs and demand more." This is the worldly doctrine of today. And they believe that this is freedom. The result for the rich is isolation and suicide, for the poor, envy and murder.”

Tags : Destructiveness Greed Materialism Needs Selfishness Vice
Source : The Brothers Karamazov

16. “Nothing is easier than to denounce the evildoer; nothing is more difficult than to understand him.”

Tags : Evil Understanding

17. “The darker the night, the brighter the stars, The deeper the grief, the closer is God!”

Tags : God Grief Night
Source : Crime and Punishment

18. “You sensed that you should be following a different path, a more ambitious one, you felt that you were destined for other things but you had no idea how to achieve them and in your misery you began to hate everything around you.”

Tags : Artists Misery
Source : Netochka Nezvanova

19. “But man is a fickle and disreputable creature and perhaps, like a chess-player, is interested in the process of attaining his goal rather than the goal itself.”

Tags : 19Th Century Fiction Russian Russian Literature
Source : Notes from Underground, White Nights, The Dream of a Ridiculous Man, and Selections from The House of the Dead

20. “Because everyone is guilty for everyone else. For all the 'wee ones,' because there are little children and big children. All people are 'wee ones.' And I'll go for all of them, because there must be someone who will go for all of them.”

Tags : Common Place Inspirational Russian Sacrifice
Source : The Brothers Karamazov

21. “A volte l'uomo è straordinariamente, appassionatamente innamorato della sofferenza.”

Tags : Russian

22. “La verità reale è sempre inverosimile […]. Per rendere la verità più verosimile, bisogna assolutamente mescolarvi della menzogna.”

Tags : Russian

23. “There is something at the bottom of every new human thought, every thought of genius, or even every earnest thought that springs up in any brain, which can never be communicated to others, even if one were to write volumes about it and were explaining one's idea for thirty-five years; there's something left which cannot be induced to emerge from your brain, and remains with you forever; and with it you will die, without communicating to anyone perhaps the most important of your ideas.”

Tags : Ideas
Source : The Idiot

24. “I love mankind, he said, "but I find to my amazement that the more I love mankind as a whole, the less I love man in particular.”

Tags : Humanity Individuals Love Mankind
Source : The Brothers Karamazov

25. “Too many riddles weigh men down on earth. We must solve as we can, and try to keep a dry skin in the water.”

Tags : Life Man Mankind Riddles
Source : The Brothers Karamazov

26. “Oh, gentlemen, perhaps I really regard myself as an intelligent man only because throughout my entire life I've never been able to start or finish anything. Granted, granted I'm a babbler, a harmless, irksome babbler, as we all are. But what's to be done if the sole and express purpose of every intelligent man is babble--that is, a deliberate pouring from empty into void.”

Tags : Intelligence Meaning Of Life Philosophical Musings Searching Thinking
Source : Notes from Underground, White Nights, The Dream of a Ridiculous Man, and Selections from The House of the Dead

27. “Bah! You want to hear the vilest thing a man’s done and you want him to be a hero at the same time!”

Tags : Literary Fiction Literature
Source : The Idiot

28. “Why didst Thou reject that last gift? Had Thou accepted that last offer of the mighty spirit, Thou wouldst have accomplished all that man seeks on earth-- that is, someone to worship, someone to keep his conscience, and some means of uniting all in one unanimous and harmonious ant heap, because the craving for universal unity is the third and last anguish of men. Mankind as a whole has always striven to organize a universal state.”

Tags : Philosophy Philosophy Of Religion
Source : The Brothers Karamazov

29. “For, after all, you do grow up, you do outgrow your ideals, which turn to dust and ashes, which are shattered into fragments; and if you have no other life, you just have to build one up out of these fragments. And all the time your soul is craving and longing for something else. And in vain does the dreamer rummage about in his old dreams, raking them over as though they were a heap of cinders, looking in these cinders for some spark, however tiny, to fan it into a flame so as to warm his chilled blood by it and revive in it all that he held so dear before, all that touched his heart, that made his blood course through his veins, that drew tears from his eyes, and that so splendidly deceived him!”

Tags : Growing Up Idealism Maturity
Source : White Nights and Other Stories

30. “I'll go this minute!' Of course, I remained.”

Tags : Desperation Frustration Indignation
Source : Notes from Underground

31. “It's life that matters, nothing but life—the process of discovering, the everlasting and perpetual process, not the discovery itself, at all.”

Tags : 1869 Clinging Detachment Discovery Hippolyte
Source : The Idiot

32. “But how could you live and have no story to tell?”

Tags : Life Story
Source : White Nights

33. “We all come out from Gogol's 'Overcoat'.”

Tags : Inspirational Literature Nikolai Gogol Russian Literature

34. “All is in a man's hands and he lets it all slip from cowardice, that's an axiom. It would be interesting to know what it is men are most afraid of. Taking a new step, uttering a new word is what they fear most… .”

Tags : Classics Crime And Punishment Dostoevsky Dostoyevski Dostoyevsky Life Life Philosophy Life Quotes Russian Literature
Source : Crime and Punishment

35. “Quien para otro cava una zanja en ella cae”

Tags : Pessimistic Russian Literature True To Life Truth Telling

36. “The fear of appearances is the first symptom of impotence.”

Tags : Life Perspective Social Norms Society
Source : Crime and Punishment

37. “I swear, gentlemen, that to be too conscious is an illness - a real thorough-going illness.”

Tags : Conscious Disease Fyodor Dostoyevsky Illness Intellect Notes From The Underground Reason
Source : Notes from Underground, White Nights, The Dream of a Ridiculous Man, and Selections from The House of the Dead

38. “In place of the clear and rigid ancient law, You [oh Lord] made man decide about good and evil for himself, with no other guidance than Your example. But did it never occur to You that man would disregard Your example, even question it, as well as Your truth, when he was subjected to so fearful a burden as freedom of choice?”

Tags : Divine Example Divine Truth Freedom Of Choice
Source : The Grand Inquisitor

39. “It was a wonderful night, such a night as is only possible when we are young, dear reader. The sky was so starry, so bright that, looking at it, one could not help asking oneself whether ill-humoured and capricious people could live under such a sky. That is a youthful question too, dear reader, very youthful, but may the Lord put it more frequently into your heart!”

Tags : Innocence Night Sky Young

40. “Advantage! What is advantage? And will you take it upon yourself to define with perfect accuracy in what the advantage of man consists? And what if it so happens that a man's advantage, sometimes, not only may, but even must, consist in his desiring in certain cases what is harmful to himself and not advantageous. And if so, if there can be such a case, the whole principle falls into dust. What do you think–are there such cases? You laugh; laugh away, gentlemen, but only answer me: have man's advantages been reckoned up with perfect certainty?”

Tags : Advantage
Source : Notes from Underground, White Nights, The Dream of a Ridiculous Man, and Selections from The House of the Dead

41. “And all that for the most foolish reason, which, one would think, was hardly worth mentioning: that is, that man everywhere and at all times, whoever he may be, has preferred to act as he chose and not in the least as his reason and advantage dictated. And one may choose what is contrary to one's own interests, and sometimes one positively ought (that is my idea).”

Tags : Advantage Interests
Source : Notes from Underground, White Nights, The Dream of a Ridiculous Man, and Selections from The House of the Dead

42. “If you wish to glimpse inside a human soul and get to know a man, don't bother analyzing his ways of being silent, of talking, of weeping, of seeing how much he is moved by noble ideas; you will get better results if you just watch him laugh. If he laughs well, he's a good man.”

Tags : Character Goodness Laughter

43. “Do you suppose, gentlemen, that our children as they grow up and begin to reason can avoid such questions? No, they cannot, and we will not impose on them an impossible restriction. The sight of an unworthy father involuntarily suggests tormenting questions to a young creature, especially when he compares him with the excellent fathers of his companions. The conventional answer to this question is: 'He begot you, and you are his flesh and blood, and therefore you are bound to love him.' The youth involuntarily reflects: 'But did he love me when he begot me?' he asks, wondering more and more. 'Was it for my sake he begot me? He did not know me, not even my sex, at that moment, at the moment of passion, perhaps, inflamed by wine, and he has only transmitted to me a propensity to drunkenness- that's all he's done for me.... Why am I bound to love him simply for begetting me when he has cared nothing for me all my life after?Oh, perhaps those questions strike you as coarse and cruel, but do not expect an impossible restraint from a young mind. 'Drive nature out of the door and it will fly in at the window'.”

Tags : Fatherhood Nature
Source : The Brothers Karamazov

44. “Since man cannot live without miracles, he will provide himself with miracles of his own making. He will believe in witchcraft and sorcery, even though he may otherwise be a heretic, an atheist, and a rebel.”

Tags : Heresy Miracles Superstition Witchcraft
Source : The Brothers Karamazov

45. “Equality lies only in human moral dignity. ... Let there be brothers first, then there will be brotherhood, and only then will there be a fair sharing of goods among brothers.”

Tags : Brotherhood Dignity Equality Sharing
Source : The Brothers Karamazov

46. “Be near your brothers. Not just one, but both of them.”

Tags : Brotherhood Compassion Humanity
Source : The Brothers Karamazov

47. “The mystery of human existence lies not in just staying alive, but in finding something to live for.”

Tags : Goals In Life Purpose Of Life
Source : The Brothers Karamazov

48. “The repugnance to what must ensue almost immediately, and the uncertainty, were dreadful, he said; but worst of all was the idea, 'What should I do if I were not to die now? What if I were to return to life again? What an eternity of days, and all mine! How I should grudge and count up every minute of it, so as to waste not a single instant!' He said that this thought weighed so upon him and became such a terrible burden upon his brain that he could not bear it, and wished they would shoot him quickly and have done with it."The prince paused and all waited, expecting him to go on again and finish the story."Is that all?" asked Aglaya."All? Yes," said the prince, emerging from a momentary reverie."And why did you tell us this?""Oh, I happened to recall it, that's all! It fitted into the conversation—""You probably wish to deduce, prince," said Alexandra, "that moments of time cannot be reckoned by money value, and that sometimes five minutes are worth priceless treasures. All this is very praiseworthy; but may I ask about this friend of yours, who told you the terrible experience of his life? He was reprieved, you say; in other words, they did restore to him that 'eternity of days.' What did he do with these riches of time? Did he keep careful account of his minutes?""Oh no, he didn't! I asked him myself. He said that he had not lived a bit as he had intended, and had wasted many, and many a minute.""Very well, then there's an experiment, and the thing is proved; one cannot live and count each moment; say what you like, but one cannot." "That is true," said the prince, "I have thought so myself. And yet, why shouldn't one do it?""You think, then, that you could live more wisely than other people?" said Aglaya."I have had that idea.""And you have it still?""Yes — I have it still," the prince replied.”

Tags : Alertness Awareness Experience Living Wakefully Value Wakefulness Wasting Time
Source : The Idiot

49. “The soul is healed by being with children.”

Tags : Children Healing Humility Inspiration Love Openness Society

50. “The instinct of self-preservation and the urge to self-destruction are equally strong in man! The Devil has equal a sway over humanity as God until a time still unknown to us.”

Tags : Devil God Self Destruction Self Preservation

51. “Man only likes to count his troubles; he doesn't calculate his happiness.”

Tags : Happiness Man Trouble
Source : Notes from Underground, White Nights, The Dream of a Ridiculous Man, and Selections from The House of the Dead

52. “...to return to their 'native soil,' as they say, to the bosom, so to speak, of their mother earth, like frightened children, yearning to fall asleep on the withered bosom of their decrepit mother, and to sleep there for ever, only to escape the horrors that terrify them.”

Tags : Death Depression Earth Escape Fear Horror Misery Mother Sleep Sorrow Suicide Terror
Source : The Brothers Karamazov

53. “If you want to be respected by others, the great thing is to respect yourself. Only by that, only by self-respect will you compel others to respect you.”

Tags : Respect Self Respect
Source : The Insulted and Humiliated

54. “Man, do not pride yourself on your superiority to the animals, for they are without sin, while you, with all your greatness, you defile the earth wherever you appear and leave an ignoble trail behind you -- and that is true, alas, for almost every one of us!”

Tags : Animals Creation Destruction Of Nature Mankind
Source : The Brothers Karamazov

55. “Life had stepped into the place of theory and something quite different would work itself out in his mind.”

Tags : Fate God Life Mind Soul Theory Thought Universal
Source : Crime and Punishment

56. “Power is given only to him who dares to stoop and take it ... one must have the courage to dare.”

Tags : Dare Power
Source : Crime and Punishment

57. “I am a dreamer. I know so little of real life that I just can’t help re-living such moments as these in my dreams, for such moments are something I have very rarely experienced. I am going to dream about you the whole night, the whole week, the whole year.”

Tags : Dream Dreamer Fyodor Dostoyevsky Memories White Nights
Source : White Nights

58. “Every man has some reminiscences which he would not tell to everyone, but only to his friends. He has others which he would not reveal even to his friends, but only to himself, and that in secret. But finally there are still others which a man is even afraid to tell himself, and every decent man has a considerable number of such things stored away. That is, one can even say that the more decent he is, the greater the number of such things in his mind.”

Tags : Secret

59. “Without God all things are permitted.”

Tags : God Religion

60. “The man who lies to himself and listens to his own lie comes to such a pass that he cannot distinguish the truth within him, or around him, and so loses all respect for himself and for others. And having no respect he ceases to love, and in order to occupy and distract himself without love he gives way to passions and coarse pleasures, and sinks to bestiality in his vices, all from continual lying to other men and to himself.”

Tags : Lies Sin Truth
Source : The Brothers Karamazov

61. “The Russian soul is a dark place.”

Tags : Darkness Russians Souls
Source : The Idiot

62. “Much unhappiness has come into the world because of bewilderment and things left unsaid.”

Tags : Communication Confusion

63. “Though I do not believe in the order of things, still the sticky little leaves that come out in the spring are dear to me, the blue sky is dear to me, some people are dear to me, whom one loves sometimes, would you believe it, without even knowing why; some human deeds are dear to me, which one has perhaps long ceased believing in, but still honors with one's heart, out of old habit..."--Ivan Karamazov”

Tags : Alyosha Karamazov Faith Ivan Karamazov Life Logic Meaning Of Life Reason Spirituality Tavern

64. “We're always thinking of eternity as an idea that cannot be understood, something immense. But why must it be? What if, instead of all this, you suddenly find just a little room there, something like a village bath-house, grimy, and spiders in every corner, and that's all eternity is. Sometimes, you know, I can't help feeling that that's what it is.”

Tags : Eternity
Source : Crime and Punishment

65. “Whoever has experienced the power and the unrestrained ability to humiliate another human being automatically loses his own sensations. Tyranny is a habit, it has its own organic life, it develops finally into a disease. The habit can kill and coarsen the very best man or woman to the level of a beast. Blood and power intoxicate ... the return of the human dignity, repentance and regeneration becomes almost impossible.”

Tags : Intimidation Power
Source : The House of the Dead

66. “Ils verseront de sottes larmes et comprendront, que le créateur, en les faisant rebelles a voulu se moquer d'eux, assurément. Ils le crieront avec désespoir et ce blasphème les rendra encore plus malheureux.”

Tags : Atheism Rebels
Source : Les Frères Karamazov

67. “Nothing in this world is harder than speaking the truth, nothing easier than flattery.”

Tags : Honesty Integerity

68. “There are some people about whom it is difficult to say anything which would describe them immediately and fully in their most typical and characteristic aspects; these are the people who are usually called "ordinary" and accounted as "the majority," and who actually do make up the great majority of society. In their novels and stories writers most often try to choose and present vividly and artistically social types which are extremely seldom encountered in real life, and which are nevertheless more real than real life itself. Podkolyosin, viewed as a type, in perhaps exaggerated, but he is hardly unknown. How many clever people having learned from Gogol about Podkolyosin at once discover that great numbers of their friends bear a terrific resemblance to Podkolyosin. They knew before Gogol that their friends were like Podkolyosin, except they did not know yet that that was their name...Nevertheless the question remains before us: what is the novelist to do with the absolutely "ordinary" people, and how can he present them to readers so that they are at all interesting? To leave them out of a story completely is not possible, because ordinary people are at every moment, by and large, the necessary links in the chain of human affairs; leaving them out, therefore, means to destroy credibility. To fill a novel entirely with types or, simply for the sake of interest, strange and unheard-of people, would be improbable and most likely not even interesting. In our opinion the writer must try to find interesting and informative touches even among commonplace people. When, for example, the very nature of certain ordinary persons consists precisely of their perpetual and unvarying ordinariness, or, better still, when in spite of their most strenuous efforts to life themselves out of the rut of ordinariness and routine, then such persons acquire a certain character of their own-the typical character of mediocrity which refuses to remain what it is and desires at all costs to become original and independent, without having the slightest capacity for independence.”

Tags : Art Dostoevsky Dostoyevsky Literature Literature About Literature Ordinariness Ordinary People The Idiot

69. “There is, indeed, nothing more vexing than to be, for example, rich, of good family, of decent appearance, fairly well educated, not stupid, rather good-hearted even, and at the same time to possess no talent, no special quality, no eccentricity even, not a single idea of one's own, to be precisely "like everyone else."One is rich, but not so rich as Rothschild; of a good family, but one which has never distinguished itself in any way; of decent appearance, but an appearance expressive of very little; well educated, but without knowing what to do with that education; one is intelligent, but without one's own ideas; one is good-hearted, but without greatness of soul, and so on and so forth. There are a great number of such people in the world, far more than it appears.”

Tags : Dostoyevsky Ordinariness Ordinary People The Idiot

70. “One of the characters in our story, Gavril Ardalionovitch Ivolgin, belonged to the other category; he belonged to the category of "much cleverer" people; though head to toe he was infected with the desire to be original. But this class of person, as we have observed above, is far less happy than the first. The difficulty is that the intelligent "ordinary" man, even if he does imagine himself at times (and perhaps all his life) a person of genius and originality, nevertheless retains within his heart a little worm of doubt, which sometimes leads the intelligent man in the end to absolute despair. If he does yield in this belief, he is still completely poisoned with inward-driven vanity.”

Tags : Dostoyevsky Intelligence Intelligent People Ordinary People The Idiot Vanity

71. “Right or wrong, it's very pleasant to break something from time to time.”

Tags : Destruction

72. “... when God will chastise a man, He first of all deprives him of his reason....”

Tags : 1869 Chastisement Chastisement Quotes Epigram Lebedyev
Source : The Idiot

73. “It's God that's worrying me. That's the only thing that's worrying me. What if He doesn't exist? What if Rakitin's right -that it's an idea made up by men? Then, if He doesn't exist, man is the king of the earth, of the universe. Magnificent! Only how is he going to be good without God? That's the question. I always come back to that. Who is man going to love then? To whom will he be thankful? To whom will he sing the hymn? Rakitin laughs. Rakitin says that one can love humanity instead of God. Well, only an idiot can maintain that. I can't understand it. Life's easy for Rakitin. 'You'd better think about the extension of civic rights, or of keeping down the price of meat. You will show your love for humanity more simply and directly by that, than by philosophy.' I answered him: 'Well, but you, without a God, are more likely to raise the price of meat if it suits you, and make a rouble on every penny.' He lost his temper. But after all, what is goodness? Answer that, Alyosha. Goodness is one thing with me and another with a Chinaman, so it's relative. Or isn't it? Is it not relative? A treacherous question! You won't laugh if I tell you it's kept me awake for two nights. I only wonder now how people can live and think nothing about it. Vanity!”

Tags : God Good Moral Law Relativism
Source : The Brothers Karamazov

74. “(Ivan) Hold your tongue, or I'll kill you!(The devil) You'll kill me? No, excuse me, I will speak. I came to treat myself to that pleasure. Oh, I love the dreams of my ardent young friends, quivering with eagerness for life! 'There are new men,' you decided last spring, when you were meaning to come here, 'they propose to destroy everything and begin with cannibalism. Stupid fellows! they didn't ask my advice! I maintain that nothing need be destroyed, that we only need to destroy the idea of God in man, that's how we have to set to work. It's that, that we must begin with. Oh, blind race of men who have no understanding! As soon as men have all of them denied God -- and I believe that period, analogous with geological periods, will come to pass -- the old conception of the universe will fall of itself without cannibalism, and, what's more, the old morality, and everything will begin anew. Men will unite to take from life all it can give, but only for joy and happiness in the present world. Man will be lifted up with a spirit of divine Titanic pride and the man-god will appear. From hour to hour extending his conquest of nature infinitely by his will and his science, man will feel such lofty joy from hour to hour in doing it that it will make up for all his old dreams of the joys of heaven. Everyone will know that he is mortal and will accept death proudly and serenely like a god. His pride will teach him that it's useless for him to repine at life's being a moment, and he will love his brother without need of reward. Love will be sufficient only for a moment of life, but the very consciousness of its momentariness will intensify its fire, which now is dissipated in dreams of eternal love beyond the grave'... and so on and so on in the same style. Charming!Ivan sat with his eyes on the floor, and his hands pressed to his ears, but he began trembling all over. The voice continued.(The devil) The question now is, my young thinker reflected, is it possible that such a period will ever come? If it does, everything is determined and humanity is settled for ever. But as, owing to man's inveterate stupidity, this cannot come about for at least a thousand years, everyone who recognises the truth even now may legitimately order his life as he pleases, on the new principles. In that sense, 'all things are lawful' for him. What's more, even if this period never comes to pass, since there is anyway no God and no immortality, the new man may well become the man-god, even if he is the only one in the whole world, and promoted to his new position, he may lightheartedly overstep all the barriers of the old morality of the old slaveman, if necessary. There is no law for God. Where God stands, the place is holy. Where I stand will be at once the foremost place... 'all things are lawful' and that's the end of it! That's all very charming; but if you want to swindle why do you want a moral sanction for doing it? But that's our modern Russian all over. He can't bring himself to swindle without a moral sanction. He is so in love with truth-.”

Tags : God Moral Law Science Truth
Source : The Brothers Karamazov

75. “Lack of originality, everywhere, all over the world, from time immemorial, has always been considered the foremost quality and the recommendation of the active, efficient and practical man.”

Tags : Liberal Nihilism Russia
Source : The Idiot

76. “I must add... my gratitude to you for the attention with which you have listened to me, for, from my numerous observations, our Liberals are never capable of letting anyone else have a conviction of his own without at once meeting their opponent with abuse or even something worse.”

Tags : Liberal Nihilism Russia
Source : The Idiot

77. “Why did you come in to-night with your heads in the air? 'Make way, we are coming! Give us every right and don't you dare breathe a word before us. Pay us every sort of respect, such as no one's ever heard of, and we shall treat you worse than the lowest lackey!' They strive for justice, they stand on their rights, and yet they've slandered him like infidels in their article. We demand, we don't ask, and you will get no gratitude from us, because you are acting for the satisfaction of your own conscience! Queer sort of reasoning!... He has not borrowed money from you, he doesn't owe you anything, so what are you reckoning on, if not his gratitude? So how can you repudiate it? Lunatics! They regard society as savage and inhuman, because it cries shame on the seduced girl; but if you think society inhuman, you must think that the girl suffers from the censure of society, and if she does, how is it you expose her to society in the newspapers and expect her not to suffer? Lunatics! Vain creatures! They don't believe in God, they don't believe in Christ! Why, you are so eaten up with pride and vanity that you'll end by eating up one another, that's what I prophesy. Isn't that topsy-turvydom, isn't it infamy?”

Tags : Christ Christianity Conceit God Liberal Nihilism Pride Russia Vanity
Source : The Idiot

78. “It is easier for a Russian to become an Atheist, than for any other nationality in the world. And not only does a Russian 'become an Atheist,' but he actually BELIEVES IN Atheism, just as though he had found a new faith, not perceiving that he has pinned his faith to a negation. Such is our anguish of thirst!”

Tags : Atheism Belief Christianity Faith Russia
Source : The Idiot

79. “It is precisely that requirement of shared worship that has been the principal source of suffering for individual man and the human race since the beginning of history. In their efforts to impose universal worship, men have unsheathed their swords and killed one another. They have invented gods and challenged each other: "Discard your gods and worship mine or I will destroy both your gods and you!”

Tags : Crusades Fanaticism Freedom Of Religion War Worship
Source : The Brothers Karamazov

80. “What is honour, my dear, when you have nothing to eat?”

Tags : Poor People

81. “Kushdo qofte, edhe njeriu i vogel, nga ata qe nuk e turbullojne ujin, qe askujt s'i bien me qafe, qe rrojne me friken e perendise, por edhe me friken per veten, shkojne me mendjen te mos ngacmojne njeri se keshtu as ate vete nuk do ta ngacmojne, do ta lene te qete ne hallet e tij, nuk deshiron qe te tjeret te futin hundet ne jeten e perditshme qe ben, nuk ia ka enda te flasin ne e ka te ri apo te vjeter jelekun, ne i ka te reja apo me mballoma çizmet, nuk ia ka enda te marrin vesh te tjeret ç'eshte duke ngrene, çfare po shkruan?... E ç'te keqe paska, moj zemer, qe une, kur shoh xhadene te prishur, eci ne maje te gishtave, shkel me kujdes per te ruajtur çizmet? Pse duhet shkruar per tjetrin qe ndonjehere nuk ka para as per te pire nje gote çaj? Sikur qenka e thene dhe e vulosur qe njerezit, te gjithe sa jane, patjeter duhet te pine çaj. Po pse e udhes qenka te shohesh ne gojen e tjetrit per te ditur ç'cope eshte duke pertypur? A fyhet njeriu keshtu? Jo, shpirti im! Perse u dashka fyer tjetri kur ai s'te ngacmon?”

Tags : Albanian Folk Njerez Poor People Shqip Te Thenie Varfer

82. “Taking a new step, uttering a new word, is what people fear most.”

Tags : Change Fear Of Change
Source : Crime and Punishment

83. “how anxiously I yearned for those I had forsaken.”

Tags : Anxious Love Missing Someone Pain People Relationships Sadness Unbearable
Source : The Dream of a Ridiculous Man

84. “It seems, in fact, as though the second half of a man's life is made up of nothing, but the habits he has accumulated during the first half.”

Tags : Life

85. “Nature does not ask your permission, she has nothing to do with your wishes, and whether you like her laws or dislike them, you are bound to accept her as she is, and consequently all her conclusions.”

Tags : Laws Of Nature Nature
Source : Notes from Underground, White Nights, The Dream of a Ridiculous Man, and Selections from The House of the Dead

86. “..so that everything he does is not done by his willing it, but is done of itself, by the laws of nature. Consequently we have only to discover these laws of nature, and man will no longer have to answer for his actions and life will become exceedingly easy for him. All human actions will then, of course, be tabulated according to these laws, mathematically, like tables of logarithms up to 108,000, and entered in an index; or, better still, there would be published certain edifying works of the nature of encyclopaedic lexicons, in which everything will be so clearly calculated and explained that there will be no more incidents or adventures in the world.”

Tags : Laws Of Nature
Source : Notes from Underground, White Nights, The Dream of a Ridiculous Man, and Selections from The House of the Dead

87. “Gentlemen, I am tormented by questions; answer them for me. You, for instance, want to cure men of their old habits and reform their will in accordance with science and good sense. But how do you know, not only that it is possible, but also that it is desirable to reform man in that way? And what leads you to the conclusion that man's inclinations need reforming? In short, how do you know that such a reformation will be a benefit to man?”

Tags : Benefit Reform Science
Source : Notes from Underground, White Nights, The Dream of a Ridiculous Man, and Selections from The House of the Dead

88. “It ended by my almost believing (perhaps actually believing) that this was perhaps my normal condition. But at first, in the beginning, what agonies I endured in that struggle! I did not believe it was the same with other people, and all my life I hid this fact about myself as a secret. I was ashamed (even now, perhaps, I am ashamed): I got to the point of feeling a sort of secret abnormal, despicable enjoyment in returning home to my corner on some disgusting Petersburg night, acutely conscious that that day I had committed a loathsome action again, that what was done could never be undone, and secretly, inwardly gnawing, gnawing at myself for it, tearing and consuming myself till at last the bitterness turned into a sort of shameful accursed sweetness, and at last—into positive real enjoyment! Yes, into enjoyment, into enjoyment! I insist upon that. I have spoken of this because I keep wanting to know for a fact whether other people feel such enjoyment? I will explain; the enjoyment was just from the too intense consciousness of one’s own degradation; it was from feeling oneself that one had reached the last barrier, that it was horrible, but that it could not be otherwise; that there was no escape for you; that you never could become a different man; that even if time and faith were still left you to change into something different you would most likely not wish to change; or if you did wish to, even then you would do nothing; because perhaps in reality there was nothing for you to change into.And the worst of it was, and the root of it all, that it was all in accord with the normal fundamental laws of over-acute consciousness, and with the inertia that was the direct result of those laws, and that consequently one was not only unable to change but could do absolutely nothing. Thus it would follow, as the result of acute consciousness, that one is not to blame in being a scoundrel; as though that were any consolation to the scoundrel once he has come to realise that he actually is a scoundrel.”

Tags : Actions Agony Depression Despair Fatalism Hopelessness Inevitabilities Shame Struggle
Source : Notes from Underground, White Nights, The Dream of a Ridiculous Man, and Selections from The House of the Dead

89. “How anxiously I yearned for those I had forsake”

Tags : Anxious Departure Love Missing Someone Unbearable Yearning
Source : The Dream of a Ridiculous Man

90. “What's most revolting is that one is really sad! No, it's better at home. Here at least one blames others for everything and excuses oneself.”

Tags : Foreign Travel Home Svidrigailov
Source : Crime and Punishment

91. “Twice two is four is not life, gentlemen, but the beginning of death.”

Tags : Intellect Rationalism
Source : Notes from Underground & The Double

92. “Why, the whole world of knowledge is not worth that child's prayer to 'dear, kind God'! I say nothing of the sufferings of grown-up people, they have eaten the apple, damn them, and the devil take them all! But these little ones!The Brothers KaramazovIvan to Alyosha, on the suffering and torture of children, "Book V - Pro and Contra, Chapter 4 - Rebellion.”

Tags : Children Community Faith God Nihilism Suffering The Brothers Karamazov Theodicy

93. “There is something spiteful and yet open-hearted about you”

Tags : Brothers Karamazov Dedication Dostoevsky Fyodor Dostoevsky Ivan Karamazov Karamazov Love
Source : The Brothers Karamazov

94. “What is most vile and despicable about money is that it even confers talent. And it will do so until the end of the world.”

Tags : Money Ridiculous Talent The Idiot

95. “Life [had] replaced logic.”

Tags : Crime And Punishment Life Of Meaning Raskolnikov Resurrection
Source : Crime and Punishment

96. “Why is it that when you awake to the world of realities you nearly always feel, sometimes very vividly, that the vanished dream has carried with it some enigma which you have failed to solve?”

Tags : Dreams Meaning Reality
Source : The Idiot

97. “For a woman, all resurrection, all salvation, from whatever perdition, lies in love; in fact, it is her only way to it.”

Tags : Love Salvation Women
Source : Notes from Underground, White Nights, The Dream of a Ridiculous Man, and Selections from The House of the Dead

98. “To think too much is a disease.”

Tags : Mental Health Mental Illness Overthinking
Source : Notes from Underground & The Double

99. “It was more difficult not tounderstand than to understand.”

Tags : Affair Difficult Disgraceful Dostoyevsky Fyodor Nasty Quote Story Understand
Source : A Nasty Anecdote

100. “Do you know I don't know how one can walk by a tree and not be happy at the sight of it? How can one talk to a man and not be happy in loving him! Oh, it's only that I'm not able to express it...And what beautiful things there are at every step, that even the most hopeless man must feel to be beautiful! Look at a child! Look at God's sunrise! Look at the grass, how it grows! Look at the eyes that gaze at you and love you!...”

Tags : Creation Delight Wonder
Source : The Idiot

101. “If someone proved to me that Christ is outside the truth and that in reality the truth were outside of Christ, then I should prefer to remain with Christ rather than with the truth.”

Tags : Christ Truth
Source : Complete Letters, 1868-1871

102. “Now answer me, sincerely, honestly, who lives past forty? I'll tell you who does: fools and scoundrels.”

Tags : Forty
Source : Notes from the Underground

103. “There are seconds, they come only five or six at a time, and you suddenly feel the presence of eternal harmony, fully achieved. It is nothing earthly; not that it's heavenly, but man cannot endure it in his earthly state. One must change physically or die. The feeling is clear and indisputable. As if you suddenly sense the whole of nature and suddenly say: yes, this is true. God, when he was creating the world, said at the end of each day of creation: 'Yes, this is true, this is good.' This . . . this is not tenderheartedness, but simply joy. You don't forgive anything, because there is no longer anything to forgive. You don't really love — oh, what is here is higher than love! What's most frightening is that it's so terribly clear, and there's such joy. If it were longer than five seconds — the soul couldn't endure it and would vanish. In those five seconds I live my life through, and for them I would give my whole life, because it's worth it. To endure ten seconds one would have to change physically . . . .”

Tags : Clarity Harmony
Source : Demons

104. “Do you think, you who sold it, that this bottom of yours has been sweet to me? Affliction, I sought affliction at the bottom of it, tears and affliction, and I found them, I tasted them.”

Tags : Alchohol
Source : Crime and Punishment

105. “Killing myself was a matter of such indifference to me that I felt like waiting for a moment when it would make some difference.”

Tags : Indifference Suicide
Source : The Dream of a Ridiculous Man

106. “As a child he was fond of hanging cats and then burying them with ceremony.”

Tags :
Source : The Brothers Karamazov

107. “... I retraced my steps, walked up to her, and in another moment would have certainly said, "Madam!" if I had not known that that exclamation had been made a thousand times before in all Russian novels of high life. It was that alone that stopped me.”

Tags : Cliche Ref First Night
Source : White Nights

108. “Schoolboys are a merciless race, individually they are angels, but together, especially in schools, they are often merciless.”

Tags : Boys Bullies School Schoolboys
Source : The Brothers Karamazov

109. “The Idiot. I have read it once, and find that I don't remember the events of the book very well--or even all the principal characters. But mostly the 'portrait of a truly beautiful person' that dostoevsky supposedly set out to write in that book. And I remember how Myshkin seemed so simple when I began the book, but by the end, I realized how I didn't understand him at all. the things he did. Maybe when I read it again it will be different. But the plot of these dostoevsky books can hold such twists and turns for the first-time reader-- I guess that's b/c he was writing most of these books as serials that had to have cliffhangers and such. But I make marks in my books, mostly at parts where I see the author's philosophical points standing in the most stark relief. My copy of Moby Dick is positively full of these marks. The Idiot, I find has a few... Part 3, Section 5. The sickly Ippolit is reading from his 'Explanation' or whatever its called. He says his convictions are not tied to him being condemned to death. It's important for him to describe, of happiness: "you may be sure that Columbus was happy not when he had discovered America, but when he was discovering it." That it's the process of life--not the end or accomplished goals in it--that matter. Well. Easier said than lived! Part 3, Section 6. more of Ippolit talking--about a christian mindset. He references Jesus's parable of The Word as seeds that grow in men, couched in a description of how people are interrelated over time; its a picture of a multiplicity. Later in this section, he relates looking at a painting of Christ being taken down from the cross, at Rogozhin's house. The painting produced in him an intricate metaphor of despair over death "in the form of a huge machine of the most modern construction which, dull and insensible, has aimlessly clutched, crushed, and swallowed up a great priceless Being, a Being worth all nature and its laws, worth the whole earth, which was created perhaps solely for the sake of the advent of this Being." The way Ippolit's ideas are configured, here, reminds me of the writings of Gilles Deleuze. And the phrasing just sort of remidns me of the way everyone feels--many people feel crushed by the incomprehensible machine, in life. Many people feel martyred in their very minor ways. And it makes me think of the concept that a narrative religion like Christianity uniquely allows for a kind of socialized or externalized, shared experience of subjectivity. Like, we all know the story of this man--and it feels like our own stories at the same time. Part 4, Section 7. Myshkin's excitement (leading to a seizure) among the Epanchin's dignitary guests when he talks about what the nobility needs to become ("servants in order to be leaders"). I'm drawn to things like this because it's affirming, I guess, for me: "it really is true that we're absurd, that we're shallow, have bad habits, that we're bored, that we don't know how to look at things, that we can't understand; we're all like that." And of course he finds a way to make that into a good thing. which, it's pointed out by scholars, is very important to Dostoevsky philosophy--don't deny the earthly passions and problems in yourself, but accept them and incorporate them into your whole person. Me, I'm still working on that one.”

Tags : Dostoevsky Existentialism Idiot

110. “Lying to ourselves is more deeply ingrained than lying to others.”

Tags : Lying Self Deception

111. “She'll come, if not today, then tomorrow, but she'll find me. That's the cursed romanticism of all these pure hearts! Oh the vileness, oh the stupidity, oh the narrowness, of these rotten, sentimental souls”

Tags : Dostoyevsky Notes Romanticism Stupidity

112. “An elder was one who took your soul, your will, into his soul and his will. When you choose an elder, you renounce your own will and yield it to him in complete submission, complete self-abnegation" just like some Muslims who conseiders their sheikh as holy, some christians worship their (elder)”

Tags : Religious Fundamentalism

113. “And, beginning to grind his teeth again, Pyotr Petrovich admitted that he'd been a fool--but only to himself, of course.”

Tags : Fool Foolish Humor Mistake Mistakes Teeth
Source : Crime and Punishment

114. “It's like this,' began the elder. 'All these sentences of hard labour in Siberian prisons, and formerly with flogging, too, do not reform anyone and, what's more, scarcely deter even one criminal, and, far from diminishing, the number of crimes are steadily increasing. You have to admit that. It therefore follows that society is not in the least protected, for though a harmful member is cut off automatically and exiled to some remote spot just to get rid of him, another criminal takes his place at once, and often, two, perhaps. If anything does protect society even today and indeed reforms the criminal himself and brings about his regeneration, it is, again, only the law of Christ, which reveals itself in the awareness of one's own consciousness. Only by recognizing his own guilt as a son of a Christian society, that is, of the Church, does the criminal recognize his guilt towards society itself, that is, towards the Church. The criminal today, therefore, is capable of recognizing his guilt only towards the Church, and not towards the State.”

Tags : Church Elder Miusov State The Brothers Karamazov
Source : The Brothers Karamazov

115. “Anna Karenina is sheer perfection as a work of art. No European work of fiction of our present day comes anywhere near it. Furthermore, the idea underlying it shows that it is ours, ours, something that belongs to us alone and that is our own property, our own national 'new word'or, at any rate, the beginning of it.”

Tags : Anna Karenina Dostoyevsky Tolstoy

116. “An artist must know the reality he is depicting in its minutest detail. In my opinion we have only one shining example of that - Count Leo Tolstoy.”

Tags : Anna Karenina Dostoyevsky Tolstoy

117. “My God, a moment of bliss. Why, isn't that enough for a whole lifetime?”

Tags : Happiness Lasting Pleasure Temporary
Source : White Nights

118. “It was a wonderful night, such a night as is only possible when we are young, dear reader.”

Tags : Night Youth
Source : White Nights

119. “If I did not believe in life, if I were to lose faith in the woman I love, if I were to lose faith in the order of things, even if I were to become convinced, on the contrary, that everything is a disorderly, damned, and perhaps devilish chaos, if I were struck even by all the horrors of human disillusionment-still I would want to live, and as long as I have bent to this cup, I will not tear myself from it until I've drunk it all!”

Tags : Chaos Death Horror Life Persistence Youth

120. “No, it is not a commonplace, sir! If up to now, for example, I have been told to 'love my neighbor,' and I did love him, what came of it?. . . What came of it was that I tore my caftan in two, shared it with my neighbor, and we were both left half naked, in accordance with the Russian proverb which says: If you chase several hares at once, you won't overtake any one of them. But science says: Love yourself before all, because everything in the world is based on self-interest. If you love only yourself, you will set your affairs up properly, and your caftan will also remain in one piece. And economic truth adds that the more properly arranged personal affairs and, so to speak, whole caftans there are in society, the firmer its foundations are and the better arranged its common cause. It follows that by acquiring for everyone, as it were, and working so that my neighbor will have something more than a torn caftan, not from private, isolated generosities now, but as a result of universal prosperity.”

Tags : Generosity Prosperity Science
Source : Crime and Punishment

121. “There is only one salvation for you: take yourself up, and make yourself responsible for all the sins of men. For indeed it is so, my friend, and the moment you make yourself sincerely responsible for everything and everyone, you will see at once that it is really so, that it is you who are guilty on behalf of all and for all. Whereas by shifting your own laziness and powerlessness onto others, you will end by sharing in Satan's pride and murmuring against God.The Brothers KaramazovBook VI - The Russian Monk, Chapter 3 - Conversations and Exhortations of Father Zosima.”

Tags : Community Eastern Orthodox God Holiness Orthodox Piety Religion Russia The Brothers Karamazov

122. “Hang your merit. I don't seek anyone's approbation.”

Tags : Approbation Approval Black Humor Disapproval Dishonesty Funny Fyodor Dostoyevsky Honestly Praise And Worship

123. “Woe to the man who offends a small child!”

Tags : Abuse Children Injury Mistreatment Small Children
Source : The Brothers Karamazov

124. “He was a sceptic, he was young, abstract, and therefore cruel.”

Tags : Cruelty Youth
Source : Crime and Punishment

125. “People talk sometimes of 'bestial' cruelty, but that's a great injustice and insult to the beast; a beast can never be so cruel as a man, so artistically, so artfully cruel.”

Tags : Cruelty

126. “She enjoyed her own pain by this egoism of suffering, if I may so express it. This aggravation of suffering and this rebelling in it I could understand; it is the enjoyment of man, of the insulted and injured, oppressed by destiny, and smarting under the sense of its injustice.”

Tags : Egoism Suffering
Source : The Insulted and Humiliated

127. “Why, the isolation that prevails everywhere, above all in our age—it has not fully developed, it has not reached its limit yet. For every one strives to keep his individuality as apart as possible, wishes to secure the greatest possible fullness of life for himself; but meantime all his efforts result not in attaining fullness of life but self-destruction, for instead of self-realization he ends by arriving at complete solitude. All mankind in our age have split up into units, they all keep apart, each in his own groove; each one holds aloof, hides himself and hides what he has, from the rest, and he ends by being repelled by others and repelling them. He heaps up riches by himself and thinks, ‘How strong I am now and how secure,’ and in his madness he does not understand that the more he heaps up, the more he sinks into self-destructive impotence. For he is accustomed to rely upon himself alone and to cut himself off from the whole; he has trained himself not to believe in the help of others, in men and in humanity, and only trembles for fear he should lose his money and the privileges that he has won for himself. Everywhere in these days men have, in their mockery, ceased to understand that the true security is to be found in social solidarity rather than in isolated individual effort. But this terrible individualism must inevitably have an end, and all will suddenly understand how unnaturally they are separated from one another. It will be the spirit of the time, and people will marvel that they have sat so long in darkness without seeing the light.”

Tags : Prediction Visionary
Source : The Brothers Karamazov

128. “I worked it through with pride,I almost spoke without words, and i'm masterly at speaking without words.All my life I have spoken without words, and I have passed through whole tragedies on my own account without words”

Tags : Dealing Life Master Silence Silent Speaking Talking Tragedies Words
Source : The Gentle Spirit

129. “He was one of the numerous and varied legion of dullards, of half-animated abortions, conceited, half-educated coxcombs, who attach themselves to the idea most in fashion only to vulgarize it and who caricature every cause they serve, however sincerely.”

Tags : Followers Fyodor Dostoevsky Hipsters Ignorance Politics Wisdom
Source : Crime and Punishment

130. “Listen, Parfyon, a few moments ago you asked me a question, and this is my answer: the essence of religious feeling has nothing to do with any reasoning, or any crimes and misdemeanors or atheism; is is something entirely different and it will always be so; it is something our atheists will always overlook, and they will never talk about THAT. But the important thing is that you will notice it most clearly in a Russian heart, and that's the conclusion I've come to! This is one of the chief convictions I have acquired in our Russia. There's work to be done, Parfyon. Believe me, there's work to be done in our Russian world!”

Tags : Fyodor Dostoevsky The Idiot
Source : The Idiot

131. “To kill for murder is an immeasurably greater evil than the crime itself. Murder by legal process is immeasurably more dreadful than murder by a brigand. A man who is murdered by brigands is killed at night in a forest or somewhere else, and up to the last moment he still hopes that he will be saved. There have been instances when a man whose throat had already been cut, was still hoping, or running away or begging for his life to be spared. But here all this last hope, which makes it ten times easier to die, is taken away FOR CERTAIN; here you have been sentenced to death, and the whole terrible agony lies in the fact that you will most certainly not escape, and there is no agony greater than that. Take a soldier and put him in front of a cannon in battle and fire at him and he will still hope, but read the same soldier his death sentence FOR CERTAIN, and he will go mad or burst out crying. Who says that human nature is capable of bearing this without madness? Why this cruel, hideous, unnecessary, and useless mockery? Possibly there are men who have sentences of death read out to them and have been given time to go through this torture, and have then been told, You can go now, you've been reprieved. Such men could perhaps tell us. It was of agony like this and of such horror that Christ spoke. No, you can't treat a mean like that.”

Tags : Fyodor Dostoevsky The Idiot

132. “You will say that it is vulgar and contemptible to drag all this into public after all the tears and transports which I have myself confessed. But why is it contemptible? Can you imagine that I am ashamed of it all, and that it was stupider than anything in your life, gentlemen? And I can assure you that some of these fancies were by no means badly composed . . . . It did not all happen on the shores of Lake Como. And yet you are right — it really is vulgar and contemptible. And most contemptible of all it is that now I am attempting to justify myself to you. And even more contemptible than that is my making this remark now. But that's enough, or there will be no end to it; each step will be more contemptible than the last . . .”

Tags : Fantasies Self Loathing
Source : Notes from Underground

133. “Know, then, that now, precisely now, these people are more certain than ever before that they are completely free, and at the same time they themselves have brought us their freedom and obediently laid it at our feet. It is our doing, but is it what you wanted? This sort of freedom?'Again I don't understand', Alyosha interrupted, 'Is he being ironic? Is he laughing?'Not in the least. He precisely lays it to his and his colleagues' credit that they have finally overcome freedom, and have done so in order to make people happy.”

Tags : Christianity Determinism Freedom Positive
Source : The Brothers Karamazov

134. “originality and a feeling of one's own dignity are achieved only through work and struggle.”

Tags : Ignorance Knowledge Originality Self Esteem Wisdom

135. “Every decent man of our age must be a coward and a slave. That is his normal condition. Of that I am firmly persuaded. He is made and constructed to that very end. And not only at the present time owing to some casual circumstance, but always, at all times, a decent man is bound to be a coward and a slave.”

Tags : Coward Fyodor Dostoyevsky Notes From The Underground Slave
Source : Notes from Underground, White Nights, The Dream of a Ridiculous Man, and Selections from The House of the Dead

136. “In my opinion, if, as the result of certain combinations, Kepler's or Newton's discoveries could become known to people in no other way than by sacrificing the lives of one, or ten, or a hundred or more people who were hindering the discovery, or standing as an obstacle in its path, then Newton would have the right, and it would even be his duty... to remove those ten or a hundred people, in order to make his discoveries known to mankind. It by no means follows from this, incidentally, that Newton should have the right to kill anyone he pleases, whomever happens along, or to steal from the market every day. Further, I recall developing in my article the idea that all... well, let's say, the lawgivers and founders of mankind, starting from the most ancient and going on to the Lycurguses, the Solons, the Muhammads, the Napoleons, and so forth, that all of them to a man were criminals, from the fact alone that in giving a new law, they thereby violated the old one, held sacred by society and passed down from their fathers, and they certainly did not stop at shedding blood either, if it happened that blood (sometimes quite innocent and shed valiantly for the ancient law) could help them.”

Tags : Crime Genius Greatness The Ends Justify The Means Utilitarianism
Source : Crime and Punishment

137. “Intelligence alone is not nearly enough when it comes to acting wisely.”

Tags : Intelligence Wisdom
Source : Crime and Punishment

138. “Man is a creature who gets used to everything, and that, I think, is the best definition of him.”

Tags : Crime And Punishment Imprisonment

139. “...if there really is some day discovered a formula for all our desires and caprices - that is, an explanation of what they depend upon, by what laws they arise, how they develop, what they are aiming at in one case and in another and so on, that is a real mathematical formula - then, most likely, man will at once cease to feel desire, indeed, he will be certain to. For who would want to choose by rule? Besides, he will at once be transformed from a human being into an organ-stop or something of that sort; for what is a man without desires, without freewill and without choice, if not a stop in an organ?”

Tags : Choice Free Will
Source : Notes from Underground, White Nights, The Dream of a Ridiculous Man, and Selections from The House of the Dead

140. “Merciful Heavens! but what do I care for the laws of nature and arithmetic, when, for some reason I dislike those laws and the fact that twice two makes four? Of course I cannot break through the wall by battering my head against it if I really have not the strength to knock it down, but I am not going to be reconciled to it simply because it is a stone wall and I have not the strength.”

Tags : Fate Free Will
Source : Notes from Underground, White Nights, The Dream of a Ridiculous Man, and Selections from The House of the Dead

141. “Oh, you knew that your deed would be preserved in books, would reach tghe depths of the ages and the utmost limits of the earth, and you hoped that, following you, man, too, would remain with God, having no need of miracles. But you did not know that as soon as man rejects miracles, he will at once reject God as well, for man seeks not so much God as miracles. And since man cannot bear to be left without miracles, he will go and create new miracles for himself... Oh, there will be centuries of free reason, of their science and anthropophagy... Freedom, free reason, and science willl lead them into such a maze, and confront them with such miracles and insoluble mysteries, that some of them, unruly and ferocious, will exterminate themselves.”

Tags : Atheism Free Will Freedom Philosophy Sublime

142. “The only gain of civilisation for mankind is the greater capacity for variety of sensations - and absolutely nothing more.”

Tags : Civilization Fyodor Dostoyevsky Notes From The Underground Sensations
Source : Notes from Underground, White Nights, The Dream of a Ridiculous Man, and Selections from The House of the Dead

143. “If the spirit has passed through a great many sensations, possibly it can no longer be sated with them, but grows more excited, and demands more sensations, and stronger and stronger ones, until at length it falls exhausted.”

Tags : Excited Exhausted Sensations
Source : The Gambler

144. “You see, gentlemen, reason is an excellent thing, there’s no disputing that, but reason is nothing but reason and satisfies only the rational side of man’s nature, while will is a manifestation of the whole life, that is, of the whole human life including reason and all the impulses. And although our life, in this manifestation of it, is often worthless, yet it is life and not simply extracting square roots.”

Tags : Human Nature Reason

145. “What does reason know? Reason only knows what it has succeeded in learning...”

Tags : Knowing Learning Reason
Source : Notes from Underground, White Nights, The Dream of a Ridiculous Man, and Selections from The House of the Dead

146. “...there is no explaining anything by reasoning and so it is useless to reason.”

Tags : Fyodor Dostoyevsky Notes From Underground Reason
Source : Notes from Underground, White Nights, The Dream of a Ridiculous Man, and Selections from The House of the Dead

147. “You see, gentlemen, reason is an excellent thing, there's no disputing that, but reason is nothing but reason and satisfies only the rational side of man's nature, while will is a manifestation of the whole life, that is, of the whole human life including reason and all the impulses. And although our life, in this manifestation of it, is often worthless, yet it is life and not simply extracting square roots. Here I, for instance, quite naturally want to live, in order to satisfy all my capacities for life, and not simply my capacity for reasoning, that is, not simply one twentieth of my capacity for life. What does reason know? Reason only knows what it has succeeded in learning (some things, perhaps, it will never learn; this is a poor comfort, but why not say so frankly?) and human nature acts as a whole, with everything that is in it, consciously or unconsciously, and, even if it goes wrong, it lives.”

Tags : Desire Life Living Reason
Source : Notes from Underground, White Nights, The Dream of a Ridiculous Man, and Selections from The House of the Dead

148. “Brother, I’m not depressed and haven’t lost spirit. Life everywhere is life, life is in ourselves and not in the external. There will be people near me, and to be a human being among human beings, and remain one forever, no matter what misfortunes befall, not to become depressed, and not to falter – this is what life is, herein lies its task.”

Tags : Human Life
Source : The Brothers Karamazov

149. “...everything defiled and degraded. What cannot man live through! Man is a creature that can get accustomed to anything, and I think that is the best definition of him.”

Tags : Defining Man Humainty Human Nature
Source : The House of the Dead

150. “Of course boredom may lead you to anything. It is boredom sets one sticking golden pins into people, but all that would not matter. What is bad (this is my comment again) is that I dare say people will be thankful for the gold pins then.”

Tags : Boredom Human Nature Man
Source : Notes from Underground, White Nights, The Dream of a Ridiculous Man, and Selections from The House of the Dead

151. “I tell you that man has no more tormenting care than to find someone to whom he can hand over as quickly as possible that gift of freedom with which the miserable creature is born. But he alone can take over the freedom of men who appeases their conscience. With bread you were given an indisputable banner: give man bread and he will bow down to you, for there is nothing more indisputable than bread. But if at the same time someone else takes over his conscience - oh, then he will even throw down your bread and follow him who has seduced his conscience. In this you were right. For the mystery of man's being is not only in living, but in what one lives for. Without a firm idea of what he lives for, man will not consent to live and will sooner destroy himself than remain on earth, even if there is bread all around him. That is so, but what came of it? Instead of taking over men's freedom, you increased it still more for them! Did you forget that peace and even death are dearer to man than free choice in the knowledge of good and evil? There is nothing more seductive for man than the freedom of his conscience, but there is nothing more tormenting either. And so, instead of a firm foundation for appeasing human conscience once and for all, you chose everything that was unusual, enigmatic, and indefinite, you chose everything that was beyond men's strength, and thereby acted as if you did not love them at all - and who did this? He who came to give his life for them! Instead of taking over men's freedom, you increased it and forever burdened the kingdom of the human soul with its torments. You desired the free love of man, that he should follow you freely. seduced and captivated by you. Instead of the firm ancient law, men had henceforth to decide for himself, with a free heart, what is good and what is evil, having only your image before him as a guide - but did it not occur to you that he would eventually reject and dispute even your image and your truth if he was oppressed by so terrible a burden as freedom of choice? They will finally cry out that the truth is not in you, for it was impossible to leave them in greater confusion and torment than you did, abandoning them to so many cares and insoluble problems. Thus you yourself laid the foundation for the destruction of your own kingdom, and do not blame anyone else for it.”

Tags : Christ Free Will Human Nature Morality

152. “I, for example, quiet plainly and simply insist upon annihilation for myself. “No,” they say, “you must go on living, for without you there would be nothing. If everything on earth were reasonable, nothing would ever happen. Without you there would be no events, and it is necessary that there should be events.” Well, and so on I drudge with unwilling heart so that there be events, and bring about unreason by command. People think toute cette comedie is something serious, all there unquestionable intelligence notwithstanding. There lies there tragedy. Well, and they suffer, of course, but … al the same they live, they live in reality, not in fantasy; for suffering is also life. Without suffering what pleasure would there be in it? Everything would turn into one single, endless church service: much holy soaring, but rather boring. Well, and I? I suffer, but even so I do not live. I am the “x” in an indeterminate equation. I am one of life’s ghosts, who has lost all the ends and the beginnings, and even at last forgotten what to call myself. You are laughing . . . No, you are not laughing, you are angry again. You are eternally angry, you would like there to be nothing but intelligence, but I will tell you again that I would renounce all this empyrean existence, all these honours and ranks just in order to be able to take fleshy form in the person of a seven-pood merchant’s wife and set up candles to God in church. ‘So, you don’t believe in God either?’ Ivan said, smiling with hatred. ‘Well, how can I explain it to you, if you are serious, that is . . . ‘ ‘Does God exist or not?’ Ivan barked, again with ferocious insistence. ‘Ah, so you are serious? My dear little dove, I swear to God I do not know, pour vous dire le grand mot.”

Tags : Delirium Demon Hallucination Ivan Karamazov Satan
Source : The Brothers Karamazov

153. “Note for a moment do I take you for a truth that is real,' Ivan exclaimed in what even amounted to fury. 'You are a falsehood, you are my illness, you are a ghost. Only I do not know how to destroy you, and perceive that for a certain time I must suffer you. You are a hallucination I am having. You are the embodiment of myself, but only of one side of me ... of my thoughts and emotions, though only those that are most loathsome and stupid. In that regard you might even be of interest to me, if only I had time to throw away on you ...”

Tags : A Karamazov Delirium Dream Hallucination
Source : The Brothers Karamazov

154. “Love children especially, for they too are sinless like the angels; they live to soften and purify our hearts and, as it were, to guide us.”

Tags : Children Love
Source : The Brothers Karamazov

155. “The poor girl ws keeping that student's letter as a precious treasure, and had run to fetch it, her only treasure, because she did not want me to go away without knowing that she, too, was honestly and genuinely loved; that she, too, was addressed respectfully. No doubt that letter was destined to lie in her box and lead to nothing. But none the less, I am certain that she would keep it all her life as a precious treasure, as her pride and justification, and now at such a minute she had thought of that letter and brought it with naive pride to raise herself in my eyes that I might see, that I, too, might think well of her.”

Tags : Asshole Belittle Ego Fyodor Dostoyevsky Judgemental Notes From Underground
Source : Notes from Underground, White Nights, The Dream of a Ridiculous Man, and Selections from The House of the Dead

156. “I exaggerate everything, that is where I go wrong”

Tags : Exaggerate
Source : Notes from Underground, White Nights, The Dream of a Ridiculous Man, and Selections from The House of the Dead

157. “I was always conscious of that weak point of mine, and sometimes very much afraid of it. "I exaggerate everything, that is where I go wrong.”

Tags : Exaggerate
Source : Notes from Underground, White Nights, The Dream of a Ridiculous Man, and Selections from The House of the Dead

158. “There in its nasty, stinking, underground home our insulted, crushed and ridiculed mouse promptly becomes absorbed in cold, malignant and, above all, everlasting spite. For forty years together it will remember its injury down to the smallest, most ignominious details, and every time will add, of itself, details still more ignominious, spitefully teasing and tormenting itself with its own imagination. It will itself be ashamed of its imaginings, but yet it will recall it all, it will go over and over every detail, it will invent unheard of things against itself, pretending that those things might happen, and will forgive nothing. Maybe it will begin to revenge itself, too, but, as it were, piecemeal, in trivial ways, from behind the stove, incognito, without believing either in its own right to vengeance, or in the success of its revenge, knowing that from all its efforts at revenge it will suffer a hundred times more than he on whom it revenges itself, while he, I daresay, will not even scratch himself. On its deathbed it will recall it all over again, with interest accumulated over all the years…”

Tags : Forgiveness Quotes Revenge Unforgiveness
Source : Notes from Underground, White Nights, The Dream of a Ridiculous Man, and Selections from The House of the Dead

159. “If God does not exist, everything is permitted.”

Tags : Belief Existence Faith God

160. “Beside himself with shame and despair, the utterly ruined though perfectly just Mr. Golyadkin dashed headlong away, wherever fate might lead him; but with every step he took, with every thud of his foot on the granite of the pavement, there leapt up as though out of the earth a Mr. Golyadkin precisely the same, perfectly alike, and of a revolting depravity of heart. And all these precisely similar Golyadkins set to running after one another as soon as they appeared, and stretched in a long chain like a file of geese, hobbling after the real Mr. Golyadkin, so there was nowhere to escape from these duplicates — so that Mr. Golyadkin, who was in every way deserving of compassion, was breathless with terror; so that at last a terrible multitude of duplicates had sprung into being; so that the whole town was obstructed at last by duplicate Golyadkins, and the police officer, seeing such a breach of decorum, was obliged to seize all these duplicates by the collar and to put them into the watch-house, which happened to be beside him . . . Numb and chill with horror, our hero woke up, and numb and chill with horror felt that his waking state was hardly more cheerful . . . It was oppressive and harrowing . . . He was overcome by such anguish that it seemed as though some one were gnawing at his heart.”

Tags : Doppelgaenger Double Dream Schizophrenia
Source : The Double

161. “Braćo, ne bojte se grehova ljudskih, volite čoveka i u grehu njegovom, jer kad ko voli čoveka grešnog, to je već slika Božanske ljubavi i vrhunac je ljubavi na zemlji. Volite sve stvorenje Božje i celokupno i svaku mrvicu. Svaki listić, svaku zraku Božju volite. Volite životinje, volite bilje, volite svaku stvar. Budeš li voleo svaku stvar – i tajnu ćeš Božju razumeti u stvarima. A shvatiš li je jedared, ti ćeš je posle neumorno početi poznavati sve dalje i više, svakodnevno. I zavolećeš, najzad, sav svet vascelom i vasionom ljubavlju. Životinje volite: njima je Bog dao klicu misli i tihu radost. Nemojte im je narušavati i remetiti, ne mučite ih, ne oduzimajte im radost, ne protivite se misli Božjoj. Čoveče, ne uznosi se, ne misli da si bolji od životinje: one su bezgrešne, a ti, sa svojim veličanstvom, ti samo gnojiš zemlju svojom pojavom, na njoj trag svoj gnojni ostavljaš posle sebe, - i to, avaj, skoro svaki, svaki između nas!Decu volite naročito, jer ona su bezgrešna kao anđeli i žive da bi nas razdragala i usrećila; ona žive zarad čišćenja srdaca naših, kao neki putokaz za nas. Teško onome ko uvredi dete...”

Tags : Agape Love People
Source : The Brothers Karamazov

162. “My wretched passions were acute, smarting, from my continual, sickly irritability I had hysterical impulses, with tears and convulsions. I had no resource except reading, that is, there was nothing in my surroundings which I could respect and which attracted me. I was overwhelmed with depression, too; I had an hysterical craving for incongruity and for contrast, and so I took to vice.”

Tags : Contrast Craving Depression Hysteria Vice

163. “Ah, Misha, he has a stormy spirit. His mind is in bondage. He is haunted by a great, unsolved doubt. He is one of those who don't want millions, but an answer to their questions.”

Tags : Answers Bondage Questions
Source : The Brothers Karamazov: A Novel in Four Parts With Epilogue

164. “Not long ago I was much amused by imagining—what if the fancy suddenly took me to kill some one, a dozen people at once, or to do some thing awful, something considered the most awful crime in the world—what a predicament my judges would be in, with my having only a fortnight to live, now that corporal punishment and torture is abolished. I should die comfortably in hospital, warm aad snug, with an attentive doctor, and very likely much more snug and comfortable than at home. I wonder that the idea doesn't strike people in my position, if only as a joke.”

Tags : 1863 Capital Punishment Consumption Cruel And Unusual Punishment Death Sentence Hippolyte Tuberculosis
Source : The Idiot

165. “There is only one way to salvation, and that is to make yourself responsible for all men's sins. As soon as you make yourself responsible in all sincerity for everything and for everyone, you will see at once that this is really so, and that you are in fact to blame for everyone and for all things.”

Tags : Orthodoxy Salvation Sin
Source : The Brothers Karamazov

166. “Milhões de pessoas morreriam de aborrecimento, por falta de imaginação, como sucede às moscas no Outono, se as privassem do oxigénio viciado da mentira.”

Tags : Society Humanity

167. “We degrade God too much, ascribing to him our ideas, in vexation at being unable to understand Him.”

Tags : God Humanity Interpretation Theology
Source : The Idiot

168. “I always feel when I meet people that I am lower than all, and that they all take me for a buffoon; so I say let me play the buffoon, for you are, every one of you, stupider and lower than I." He longed to revenge himself on every one for his own unseemliness. He suddenly recalled how he had once in the past been asked, "Why do you hate so and so, so much?" And he had answered them, with his shameless impudence, "I'll tell you. He has done me no harm. But I played him a dirty trick, and ever since I have hated him.”

Tags : Buffoon Ego Hatred Intelligence
Source : The Brothers Karamazov

169. “You said just now, "Don't be so ashamed of yourself, because that's the root of your trouble"––with those words, you seem to have reached right into my innermost soul. What I mean is, when I visit people, I always feel that I'm really the lowest of the low, that everybody takes me for a buffoon, so I say to myself, why shouldn't I act the fool, I'm not afraid of what any of you might think, because every single one of you is even worse than me. That's why I'm a buffoon, I'm a buffoon born of shame, great starets, of shame. It's anxiety pure and simple that makes me so unruly.”

Tags : Anxiety Buffoonery Confession Ego Melodrama Shame
Source : The Brothers Karamazov

170. “Noble starets, tell me, are my high spirits offensive to you or not?" Fyodor Pavlovich suddenly exclaimed, gripping the arms of his chair with both hands and appearing ready to leap out of it, depending on the reply.”

Tags : Buffoonery Comedy Humor Hyperactivity
Source : The Brothers Karamazov

171. “Do you think it is a vain hope that one day man will find joy in noble deeds of light and mercy, rather than in the coarse pleasures he indulges in today -- gluttony, fornication, ostentation, boasting, and envious vying with his neighbor? I am certain this is not a vain hope and that the day will come soon.”

Tags : Envy Gluttony Good Deeds Hope Mercy Nobility Of Spirit Sin Values
Source : The Brothers Karamazov

172. “Nuk shquhej për zgjuarsi, por në mësime ishte i pari.”

Tags : Irony Pedantic School Wits

173. “All we Karamazovs are such insects. And angel as you are, that insect lives in you, too, and will stir up a tempest in your blood. Tempests, because sensual lust is a tempest - worse than a tempest! Beauty is a terrible and awful thing! It is terrible because it has not been fathomed and never can be fathomed, for God sets before us nothing but riddles. Here the boundaries meet and all contradictions exist side by side. I am not an educated nor cultured man, Alyosha, but I've thought a lot about this. It's terrible what mysteries there are! Too many riddles weigh men down on earth. We must solve as we can, and try to keep a dry skin in the water. Beauty! I can't bear the thought that a man of lofty mind and heart begins with the ideal of the Madonna and ends with the ideal of Sodom. What's still more awful is that a man with the ideal of Sodom in his soul does not renounce the ideal of the Madonna, and his heart may be on fire with that ideal, genuinely on fire, just as in his days of youth and innocence. Yes, man is broad, too broad. I'd have him narrower. The devil only knows what to make of it! What to the mind is shameful is beauty and nothing else to the heart. Is there beauty in Sodom? Believe me, that for the immense mass of mankind beauty is found in Sodom. Did you know that secret? The awful thing is that beauty is mysterious as well as terrible. God and the devil are fighting there and the battlefield is the heart of man.”

Tags : Beauty Evil God
Source : The Brothers Karamazov

174. “he worked with great intensity without sparing himself, & he was respected for this, but no one liked him" --crime & punishment”

Tags : Friendlessness Pest Vigil

175. “Sincere and unspiteful laughter is mirth, but where is there any mirth in our time, and do people know how to be mirthful?... A man's mirth is a feature that gives away the whole man, from head to foot. Someone's character won't be cracked for a long time then the man bursts out laughing somehow quite sincerely, and his whole character suddenly opens up as if on the flat of your hand. Only a man of the loftiest and happiest development knows how to be mirthful infectiously, that is, irresistibly and goodheartedly. I'm not speaking of his mental development, but of his character, of the whole man. And so, if you want to discern a man and know his soul, you must look, not at how he keeps silent, or how he speaks, or how we weeps, or even how he is stirred by the noblest ideas, but you had better look at him when he laughs. If a man has a good laugh, it means he's a good man.”

Tags : Character Dostoevsky Laughter Mirth
Source : The Adolescent

176. “Christ knew that by bread alone you cannot reanimate man. If there were no spiritual life, no ideal of Beauty, man would pine away, die, go mad, kill himself or give himself to pagan fantasies. And as Christ, the ideal of Beauty in Himself and his Word, he decided it was better to implant the ideal of Beauty in the soul. If it exists in the soul, each would be the brother of everyone else and then, of course, working for each other, all would also be rich. Whereas if you give them bread, they might become enemies to each other out of boredom.”

Tags : Bread Christ Ideal Soul

177. “Because it begins to seem to me at such times that I am incapable of beginning a life in real life, because it has seemed to me that I have lost all touch, all instinct for the actual, the real; because at last I have cursed myself; because after my fantastic nights I have moments of returning sobriety, which are awful! Meanwhile, you hear the whirl and roar of the crowd in the vortex of life around you; you hear, you see, men living in reality; you see that life for them is not forbidden, that their life does not float away like a dream, like a vision; that their life is being eternally renewed, eternally youthful, and not one hour of it is the same as another; while fancy is so spiritless, monotonous to vulgarity and easily scared, the slave of shadows, of the idea, the slave of the first cloud that shrouds the sun... One feels that this inexhaustible fancy is weary at last and worn out with continual exercise, because one is growing into manhood, outgrowing one's old ideals: they are being shattered into fragments, into dust; if there is no other life one must build one up from the fragments. And meanwhile the soul longs and craves for something else! And in vain the dreamer rakes over his old dreams, as though seeking a spark among the embers, to fan them into flame, to warm his chilled heart by the rekindled fire, and to rouse up in it again all that was so sweet, that touched his heart, that set his blood boiling, drew tears from his eyes, and so luxuriously deceived him!”

Tags : Dreams Fantasy Life Reality
Source : White Nights

178. “But what can a decent man speak of with most pleasure?Answer: Of himself.Well, so I will talk about myself.”

Tags : Solipsism
Source : Notes from Underground, White Nights, The Dream of a Ridiculous Man, and Selections from The House of the Dead

179. “...The men of those days...were absolutely not the same people that we are now; it was not the same race as now, in our age, really, it seems we are a different species...In those days they were men of one idea, but now we are more nervous, more developed, more sensitive; men capable of two or three ideas at once...Modern men are broader-minded - and I swear that this prevents their being so all-of-a-piece as they were in those days.”

Tags : Ages Broad Mindedness
Source : The Idiot

180. “Man is a mystery. It needs to be unravelled, and if you spend your whole life unravelling it, don't say that you've wasted time. I am studying that mystery because I want to be a human being.”

Tags : Life Philosophy Wisdom

181. “I am a sick man... I am a spiteful man. I am an unpleasant man. I think my liver is diseased. However, I don't know beans about my disease, and I am not sure what is bothering me. I don't treat it and never have, though I respect medicine and doctors. Besides, I am extremely superstitious, let's say sufficiently so to respect medicine. (I am educated enough not to be superstitious, but I am.) No, I refuse to treat it out of spite. You probably will not understand that. Well, but I understand it. Of course I can't explain to you just whom I am annoying in this case by my spite. I am perfectly well aware that I cannot "get even" with the doctors by not consulting them. I know better than anyone that I thereby injure only myself and no one else. But still, if I don't treat it, its is out of spite. My liver is bad, well then-- let it get even worse!”

Tags : Philosophy
Source : Notes from Underground, White Nights, The Dream of a Ridiculous Man, and Selections from The House of the Dead

182. “I was overpowered by the mere sensation of that dream and it alone survived in my sorely wounded heart.”

Tags : Aspiration Dreams Emptiness Heart Hope Illusion Lifeless Pain Sadness Sensation Soulless Wounds
Source : The Dream of a Ridiculous Man

183. “We've got facts," they say. But facts aren't everything; at least half the battle consists in how one makes use of them!”

Tags : Battle Facts Ingenuity
Source : Crime and Punishment

184. “Does it matter whether it was a dream or a reality, if the dream made known to me the truth?”

Tags : Dreams Life Reality Truth Unconsciousness

185. “But the trouble was that the hysterics could not go on for ever, and (I am writing the loathsome truth) lying face downwards on the sofa with my face thrust into my nasty leather pillow, I began by degrees to be aware of a far-away, involuntary but irresistible feeling that it would be awkward now for me to raise my head and look Liza straight in the face. Why was I ashamed? I don't know, but I was ashamed.”

Tags : Awkwardness
Source : Notes from Underground

186. “Oh, he understood very well that for the meek soul of a simple Russian, exhausted by grief and hardship and, above all, by constant injustice and sin, his own or the world's, there was no stronger need than to find a holy shrine or a saint to prostrate himself before and to worship.”

Tags : Injustice Russian Saint Soul Worship
Source : The Brothers Karamazov

187. “Your slave and enemy,D.Karamazov”

Tags : Amazing Classic Russian
Source : The Brothers Karamazov

188. “somehow touching yet repulsive”

Tags : Russian

189. “But here I should imagine the most terrible part of the whole punishment is, not the bodily pain at all—but the certain knowledge that in an hour, then in ten minutes, then in half a minute, then now—this very instant—your soul must quit your body and that you will no longer be a man—and that this is certain, certain!”

Tags : Capital Punishment Death And Dying Dostoyevsky Guillotine Terror
Source : The Idiot

190. “What makes a hero? Courage, strength, morality, withstanding adversity? Are these the traits that truly show and create a hero? Is the light truly the source of darkness or vice versa? Is the soul a source of hope or despair? Who are these so called heroes and where do they come from? Are their origins in obscurity or in plain sight?”

Tags : Courage Darkness Despair Fall Heroes Hope Rise Strength
Source : Notes from Underground, White Nights, The Dream of a Ridiculous Man, and Selections from The House of the Dead

191. “I, for instance, was triumphant over everyone; everyone, of course, was in dust and ashes, and was forced spontaneously to recognise my superiority, and I forgave them all. I was a poet and a grand gentleman, I fell in love; I came in for countless millions and immediately devoted them to humanity, and at the same time I confessed before all the people my shameful deeds, which, of course, were not merely shameful, but had in them much that was "sublime and beautiful" something in the Manfred style. Everyone would kiss me and weep (what idiots they would be if they did not), while I should go barefoot and hungry preaching new ideas and fighting a victorious Austerlitz against the obscurantists. Then the band would play a march, an amnesty would be declared, the Pope would agree to retire from Rome to Brazil; then there would be a ball for the whole of Italy at the Villa Borghese on the shores of Lake Como, Lake Como being for that purpose transferred to the neighbourhood of Rome; then would come a scene in the bushes, and so on, and so on — as though you did not know all about it?”

Tags : Desire For Recognition Fantasies Loneliness
Source : Notes from Underground

192. “Young man,” he went on, raising his head again, “in your face I seem to read some trouble of mind. When you came in I read it, and that was why I addressed you at once. For in unfolding to you the story of my life, I do not wish to make myself a laughing-stock before these idle listeners, who indeed know all about it already, but I am looking for a man of feeling and education. Know then that my wife was educated in a high-class school for the daughters of noblemen, and on leaving, she danced the shawl dance before the governor and other personages for which she was presented with a gold medal and a certificate of merit. The medal … well, the medal of course was sold—long ago, hm … but the certificate of merit is in her trunk still and not long ago she showed it to our landlady. And although she is most continually on bad terms with the landlady, yet she wanted to tell some one or other of her past honours and of the happy days that are gone. I don’t condemn her for it. I don’t blame her, for the one thing left her is recollection of the past, and all the rest is dust and ashes. Yes, yes, she is a lady of spirit, proud and determined. She scrubs the floors herself and has nothing but black bread to eat, but won’t allow herself to be treated with disrespect. That’s why she would not overlook Mr. Lebeziatnikov’s rudeness to her, and so when he gave her a beating for it, she took to her bed more from the hurt to her feelings than from the blows. She was a widow when I married her, with three children, one smaller than the other. She married her first husband, an infantry officer, for love, and ran away with him from her father’s house. She was exceedingly fond of her husband; but he gave way to cards, got into trouble and with that he died. He used to beat her at the end: and although she paid him back, of which I have authentic documentary evidence, to this day she speaks of him with tears and she throws him up at me; and I am glad, I am glad that, though only in imagination, she should think of herself as having once been happy.… And she was left at his death with three children in a wild and remote district where I happened to be at the time; and she was left in such hopeless poverty that, although I have seen many ups and downs of all sorts, I don’t feel equal to describing it even. Her relations had all thrown her off. And she was proud, too, excessively proud.… And then, honoured sir, and then, I, being at the time a widower, with a daughter of fourteen left me by my first wife, offered her my hand, for I could not bear the sight of such suffering. You can judge the extremity of her calamities, that she, a woman of education and culture and distinguished family, should have consented to be my wife. But she did! Weeping and sobbing and wringing her hands, she married me! For she had nowhere to turn! Do you understand, sir, do you understand what it means when you have absolutely nowhere to turn? No, that you don’t understand yet…”

Tags : Crime Ivanovna Katerina Marmeladov Punishment
Source : Crime and Punishment

193. “Oh, I know, I know that heart, that wild but grateful heart, gentlemen of the jury! It will bow before your mercy; it thirsts for a great and loving action, it will melt and mount upwards. There are souls which, in their limitation, blame the whole world. But subdue such a soul with mercy, show it love, and it will curse its past, for there are many good impulses in it. Such a heart will expand and see that God is merciful and that men are good and just. He will be horror-stricken; he will be crushed by remorse and the vast obligation laid upon him henceforth. And he will not say then, 'I am quits,' but will say, 'I am guilty in the sight of all men and am more unworthy than all.' With tears of penitence and poignant, tender anguish, he will exclaim: 'Others are better than I, they wanted to save me, not to ruin me!”

Tags : Blame Forgiveness Mercy
Source : The Brothers Karamazov

194. “Feeling my own humiliation in my heart like the sharp prick of a needle.”

Tags : Brokenhearted Dostoyevsky Feelings Heart Helpless Humiliation Subdued
Source : The Dream of a Ridiculous Man

195. “And even though we may be involved with the most important affairs, achieve distinction or fall into some great misfortune- all the same, let us never forget how good we all once felt here, all together, united by such good and kind feelings as made us, too,...perhaps better than we actually are.”

Tags : Alyosha Karamazov Brothers Karamazov Dostoevsky Graduation Russian Literature
Source : The Brothers Karamazov

196. “If God thought it necessary to offer rewards for love, your God must be immoral.”

Tags : Demons Dostoyevski God Love
Source : Demons

197. “Science and reason have, from the beginning of time, played a secondary and subordinate part in the life of nations; so it will be till the end of time. Nations are built up and moved by another force which sways and dominates them, the origin of which is unknown and inexplicable: that force is the force of an insatiable desire to go on to the end, though at the same time it denies that end. It is the force of the persistent assertion of one's own existence, and a denial of death. It's the spirit of life, as the Scriptures call it, 'the river of living water,' the drying up of which is threatened in the Apocalypse. It's the æsthetic principle, as the philosophers call it, the ethical principle with which they identify it, 'the seeking for God,' as I call it more simply. The object of every national movement, in every people and at every period of its existence is only the seeking for its god, who must be its own god, and the faith in Him as the only true one. God is the synthetic personality of the whole people, taken from its beginning to its end. It has never happened that all, or even many, peoples have had one common god, but each has always had its own. It's a sign of the decay of nations when they begin to have gods in common. When gods begin to be common to several nations the gods are dying and the faith in them, together with the nations themselves. The stronger a people the more individual their God. There never has been a nation without a religion, that is, without an idea of good and evil. Every people has its own conception of good and evil, and its own good and evil. When the same conceptions of good and evil become prevalent in several nations, then these nations are dying, and then the very distinction between good and evil is beginning to disappear. Reason has never had the power to define good and evil, or even to distinguish between good and evil, even approximately; on the contrary, it has always mixed them up in a disgraceful and pitiful way; science has even given the solution by the fist. This is particularly characteristic of the half-truths of science, the most terrible scourge of humanity, unknown till this century, and worse than plague, famine, or war. A half-truth is a despot... such as has never been in the world before. A despot that has its priests and its slaves, a despot to whom all do homage with love and superstition hitherto inconceivable, before which science itself trembles and cringes in a shameful way.”

Tags : Demons Fyodor Dostoyevsky The Possessed
Source : Demons

198. “...and in fact I've noticed that faith always seems to be less in the daytime”

Tags : Demons Fydor Dostoevsky The Possessed
Source : Demons

199. “Yarının hiçlik olması tehdidiyle mutlu olamam ve olmayacağım. Derin bir hakaret bu... Bu yüzden, beni acı çekmem ve yok olmam için, fikrimi sormadan ve küstahça var eden bu doğayı; su götürmez davacı, savcı ve davalı rolümle, kendimle birlikte mahkum ediyorum... Doğayı yok edemediğim için de, sadece kendimi yok ediyorum, hiçbir suçlunun bulunmadığı bir tiranlığa katlanmaktan bezmiş olarak...”

Tags : Demons Dostoyevsky
Source : Demons

200. “Yet, I didn't understand that she was intentionally disguising her feelings with sarcasm; that was usually the last resort of people who are timid and chaste of heart, whose souls have been coarsely and impudently invaded; and who, until the last moment, refuse to yield out of pride and are afraid to express their own feelings to you.”

Tags : Sarcasm
Source : Notes from Underground, White Nights, The Dream of a Ridiculous Man, and Selections from The House of the Dead